Superficie Óptima de Presiones para el Diseño de Sistemas

En este trabajo se propone presentar un sistema de distribución de agua con base hidráulica (WDS) metodología de diseño llamada Superficie de Uso Óptimo de Potencia (OPUS). Su objetivo es llegar a los diseños de menor costo, la ejecución de un número reducido de iteraciones, y se centra en la creación de formas eficientes en el que la energía se disipa y el flujo se distribuye. Para su validación, el algoritmo propuesto fue probado en tres redes de referencia conocidas, publicadas con frecuencia en la literatura: de Two-Loop, Hanói y Balerma. Cuando se compara con los resultados obtenidos a través de otras metodologías, OPUS se destaca por permitir diseños con costos constructivos muy similares a los obtenidos en trabajos anteriores, pero requirió un número de iteraciones menor, especialmente para redes de tamaño real. La metodología mostró que siguiendo los principios de la hidráulica es una excelente opción para diseñar Sistema de Distribución de Agua (WDS) y también proporciona una vía alternativa al proceso de búsqueda tediosa realizada por metaheurísticos.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

OPTIMAL POWER USE SURFACE FOR DESIGN OF WATER DISTRIBUTION 

SYSTEMS 

 

J. Saldarriaga, D. Páez, P. Cuero and N. León

1

 

1

Universidad de los Andes – Water Distribution and Sewer Systems Research Centre (CIACUA), 

 Bogotá, Colombia 

 

 

 

 

ABSTRACT 
This  paper  intends  to  bring  forward  a  hydraulic  based  Water  Distribution  System  (WDS)  design 
methodology  named  Optimal  Power  Use  Surface  (OPUS).  Its  objective  is  to  reach  least-cost 
designs, executing a reduced number of iterations, and focusing on the setting-up of efficient ways 
in which energy is dissipated and flow is distributed. For its validation, the proposed algorithm was 
tested  on three  well  known  benchmark  networks,  frequently  reported  in  the literature:  Two-Loop, 
Hanoi and Balerma. When compared to results obtained through other methodologies, OPUS stands 
out  for  allowing  designs  with  constructive  costs  very  similar  to  those  obtained  in  previous  works 
but  requiring  a  number  of  iterations  several  orders  of  magnitude  bellow,  especially  for  real-size 
networks.  The  methodology  proved  that  following  hydraulic  principles  is  an  excellent  choice  to 
design  WDS  and  also  provides  an  alternative  path  to  the  tiresome  search  process  undertaken  by 
metaheuristics.  
 
INTRODUCTION 
The optimized design of WDSs is a relevant problem at a global scale, this being due to the scarcity 
of  resources  and  the  importance  of  drinking  water  for  human  life.  This  issue  aggravates  in  the 
context  of  developing  countries,  where  millions  of  people  still  suffer  the  lack  of  an  adequate 
service. In this context minimum-cost design methodologies are essential. 
 
Even though the design of WDSs is supposed to consider different criteria besides the construction 
costs  (e.g.  reliability,  environmental  impact  and  water  quality),  the  minimum  cost  as  the  only 
objective is still used to validate and compare new design algorithms. This type of design consists 
in  determining  the  diameter  size  of each pipe  of the  system  in  such a  way  that  flow  demands  are 
satisfied with an adequate pressure and with a minimum capital cost. In spite of the fact that pipes 
are usually manufactured in discrete-sized diameters, the amount of possible pipe configurations is 
immense, which means that the problem is highly indeterminate. In fact, Yates et al. (1984) showed 
that it is a NP-HARD problem and thus only approximate methods could be successful in finding 
adequate solutions. 
 
Initial approximations involved traditional optimization techniques such as enumeration, linear and 
non-linear  programming.  But  more  recently  these  have  been  replaced  by  different  metaheuristic 
algorithms due to their ease of implementation and other advantages like their broader search of the 
solution space, a relatively small reliance on the system’s initial configuration, and their capability 
of  incorporating  the  discrete-sized  diameters  restriction.  Successful  attempts  include  Genetic 
Algorithms  (Savic  and  Walters,  1997),  Harmony  Search  (Geem,  2006),  Scatter  Search  (Lin  et  al., 
2007), Cross Entropy (Perelman and Ostfeld, 2007),  Simulated Annealing (Reca et al., 2007), and 
Particle Swarm (Geem, 2009) among others. 
 
These  metaheuristics  consist  in  bio-inspired  algorithms  that  randomly  generate  a  large  number  of 
possible  solutions  and  test  their  fitness  in  terms  of  quality  and  capital  costs.  Generic  learning 
functions are used to progressively improve the previous results. In the WDS design context, each 
solution  corresponds  to  an  alternative  design,  which  means  a  different  set  of  pipe  diameter  sizes. 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

The evaluation of each of the alternative designs requires running static hydraulic simulations, thus 
a  large  number  of  iterations  is  needed  before  convergence  is  reached.  This  makes  metaheuristics 
very demanding in terms of computational effort regardless their flexibility and their capability of 
accomplishing  near-optimal  results.  For  this  reason,  apart  from  the  cost  of  the  final  solution,  the 
number of hydraulic simulations (or iterations) is the main indicator used to measure and compare 
the  efficiency  of  the  different  methodologies.  Even  though  the  learning  functions  used  in 
metaheuristic  algorithms  involve  testing  the  hydraulic  performance  of  each  of  the  candidate 
solutions, neither of them make use of additional hydraulic criteria. 
 
As  a  response  to  these  tedious  algorithms,  some  researchers  have  come  through  with  new 
approaches that seek to develop a hydraulic treatment of the problem. While metaheuristics intend 
to optimize an objective function behaving towards the optimization variables simply as a series of 
numbers  that  must  follow  certain  logic,  without  any  understanding  of  the  machinery  behind  that 
logic;  these  new  approaches  try  to  characterize  the  behaviour  of  the  different  hydraulic  variables 
and understand the underlying dynamics.  
 
In  1975  I-Pai  Wu  carried  out  an  analysis  for  the  drip  irrigation  main  line  design  problem, 
considering the hydraulic principles that it follows. After setting up a minimum pressure (

 

   

) at 

the  end  of  the line,  still  a  big  number  of configurations  could  be  constructed.  Wu discovered  that 
each  of  these  configurations  lead  to  a  different  way  in  which  energy  is  spent.  After  analysing 
numerous  alternatives  he  concluded  that  the  least-cost  alternative  was  that  with  a  parabolic 
hydraulic gradient line (HGL) with a sag of 15% of the total head-loss (

 ). Thus, optimal designs 

could  be  obtained  by  computing  objective  head-loss  values  for  each  pipe  derived  from  the  HGL 
fabricated using Wu´s criterion. 
 
Later  in  1983,  Professor  Ronald  Featherstone  from  Newcastle  University  in  the  United  Kingdom 
first  proposed  to  extend  Wu´s  criterion  to  the  optimization  of  looped  networks.  This  idea  seemed 
like a sound possibility and was further developed by Saldarriaga (1998), who analysed hydraulic 
gradient surfaces on several WDS designs obtained using metaheuristic algorithms. Based on Wu’s 
criterion  and  Featherstone’s  idea,  the  works  of  Villalba  (2004)  and  Ochoa  (2009)  proved  that 
hydraulic  criteria  could  be  used  as  the  basis  of  WDS  design  in  order  to  replace  the  iteration-
intensive  stochastic  approach  required  by  metaheuristics;  obtaining  promising  results,  not  only  in 
performance, but also in the insight of the inner mechanics that govern WDS design. 
 
Based  on  the  works  made  by  Ochoa  (2009)  and  Villalba  (2004),  a  first  design  methodology  was 
developed  by  the  CIACUA  (Water  Distribution  and  Sewer  Systems  Research  Centre),  named 
SOGH.  It was tested on three well known benchmark networks (Two-Loop,  Hanoi and Balerma). 
This  paper  intends  to  bring  forward  an  improvement  to  this  WDS  design  methodology  named 
Optimal Power Use Surfaces (OPUS), which proposes a net hydraulic approach following the ideas 
of  the  aforementioned  authors  (Takahashi  et  al.,  2010).  The  objective  of  this  methodology  is  to 
reach least-cost designs with a reduced number of iterations especially for real-size networks. This 
can be accomplished through the use of deterministic hydraulic principles drawn from the analysis 
of  flow  distribution  and  the  way  energy  is  used  in  the  systems.  These  principles  provide  an 
alternative path to the tiresome search process undertaken by metaheuristics. Each of the steps that 
make  up  the  OPUS  algorithm  are  explained  in  the  following  section.  Three  different  benchmark 
problems (Two-Loop, Hanoi and Balerma) are employed to test the methodology and the results are 
presented  and  discussed  in  this  paper.  Finally,  conclusions  are  drawn  from  the  outcome  obtained 
and future work guidelines are stated.  
 
METHODOLOGY 
The  developed  OPUS  design  methodology  consists  in  6  basic  sub-processes  which  are  shown  in 
Figure 1 and explained below in this section. 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

 
Sump Search or Tree Structure. This step is based on two fundamental principles:  The first one 
states that a WDS of minimum cost should convey the water to each of the demand nodes from the 
water sources, through a single route. This is drawn from the fact that redundancy is hydraulically 
inefficient,  even  though  it  favors  reliability.  Therefore,  open  WDSs  could  be  a  lot  cheaper  than 
looped networks, reason why this sub-process intends to decompose the looped system into an open 
tree-like  structure  (a  spanning  tree),  in  order  to  identify  the  nodes  in  the  original  model  that 
correspond  to the  sumps  of  the  open  network  (i.e.,  nodes  with a  lower  head  than that  of  all  of  its 
neighbors). 

Start

Sump Search

Optimal Power Use Surface

Optimal Flow Distribution

Diameter Calculation

Diameter Round-Off

Optimization

End

 

Figure 1: OPUS methodology BPMN diagram. 

 

The  second  principle  follows  from  the  flow  expression  derived  from  the  Darcy-Weisbach  and 
Colebrook-White  equations.  Leaving  all  the  other  parameters  constant,  the  flow  (

 )  presents  a 

relation approximately proportional with the diameter to a power of 2.6. Assuming  a standard pipe 
cost equation and replacing the diameter according to this proportion, the cost per length of a pipe 
as a function of its design flow behaves as shown in Figure 2; which means that as the design flow 
for a pipe increases, the marginal cost decreases. 
 

 

Figure 2: Schematic relation between pipe cost and flow. 

 

From  the  abovementioned  principles,  an  algorithm  was  designed  in  order  to  obtain  the  tree 
structure, aggregating flow values in the least number of main routes possible. The open network is 
set up starting from the water sources and then adding adjacent pipe-node pairs, one at a time. The 
group  of  available  pairs  in  each  iteration  conform  the  ‘search  front’  and  each  of  these  pairs  are 
assigned a cost-benefit value (

   ), making up a recursive process. 

  

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

 

Figure 3: Layout of the Hanoi WDS. The labels show pipe and nodal identification numbers. 

 

For example, take the Hanoi benchmark WDS shown in Figure 3: Starting from the source, the first 
pair to be added is the one consisting in pipe 1 and node 2 (<1, 2>). Then, the pair <2, 3> is added. 
At this point the pairs <3, 4>, <19, 19> and <20, 20> can be selected. These constitute the search 
front.  Figure  3  shows  the  result  for  the  entire  execution  of  the  sub-process,  where  the  pipes 
highlighted (solid black) constitute the corresponding tree structure. 
 
The  pair  in  the  front  with  the  higher  cost-benefit  value  is  selected  to  be  part  of the  tree  structure. 
The cost-benefit function of a pair is calculated by computing the quotient between the demand of 
the new node and the marginal cost of connecting it to  the source: This entails the addition of the 
total cost of the pair’s pipe to the cost difference of transporting the additional flow through all of 
the upstream pipes. It is worth noting that these are not actual costs but proportional values drawn 
from the relation shown in Figure 2. The construction of the tree using this cost-benefit function has 
an O(NN

2

) time complexity, where NN is the number of nodes. 

 
The cost-benefit function is used because it favours the creation of few main routes that transport 
the largest portion of the total water volume. The process concludes when all of the system nodes 
have been added to the tree structure and at the end the leaf nodes in the tree structure are assigned 
the status of ‘sumps’.  
 
Optimal  Power  Use  Surface.  This  sub-process  gives  the  name  to  the  entire  methodology,  being 
essential to it due to the close relation that it has with the work developed by I-Pai Wu. In this step a 
set  of  objective  hydraulic  heads  (also  understood  as  objective  head losses)  is  established  for  each 
pipe within the system. By analysing the behaviour of optimal designs, Ochoa (2009) corroborated 
Wu’s  suggestion,  finding  that  the  optimal  hydraulic  gradient  line  for  pipe  series  was  in  effect  a 
parabola.  Besides,  Ochoa  discovered  that  the  sag  of  this  parabola  depended  on  the  demand 
distribution, the ratio between flow demands and pipe length, and the cost function; putting forward 
a methodology for its calculation. 
 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

Contrarily  to  the  approaches  made  by  Villalba  (2004)  and  Ochoa  (2009),  in  the  proposed 
methodology,  the  optimal  power  use  surface  is  computed  in  the  tree  structure  instead  of  using  a 
graph algorithm on the original network. In this sense, Ochoa’s parabolic hydraulic gradient line is 
applied  to  each  of  the  branches  in  the  open  network.  First,  the  minimum  allowable  pressure  is 
assigned to each of the sump nodes. Then, the topological distance for every node in the system to 
its source is calculated. Knowing the head in the reservoir, the heads of the intermediate nodes in 
each  branch  are  calculated  with  a  Parabolic  Head  Gradient  Line  (HGL)  as  a  function  of  their 
distance to the source, as shown in Figure 4. 
 

 

Figure 4: I-Pai Wu's criterion for predefining the head on each node. 

 

As the branches converge while going over the tree upstream, it is necessary to recalculate the sag 
at each intersection by weighting the flow on each downstream route. It must be taken into account 
that  the  objective  parabola  has  to  be  modified  in  the  upstream  direction,  in  case  of  encountering 
particularly  elevated  nodes,  to  make  sure  that  the  assigned  head  values  meet  the  pressure 
requirements  in  every  instance.  Once  this  sub-process  is  concluded,  all  nodes  must  have  an 
objective head value assigned, thus a flow is required in order to calculate the diameter of each pipe 
in the network. 
 
Figure 5 shows an example of the optimal power use surface for the Hanoi network. Note that for 
the water source the HGL corresponds to the total head available in the reservoir and for the sump 
nodes it was assigned the minimum pressure.  

 

Figure 5: Assigned surface for the Hanoi network. 

 

H

GL 

(m

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

Optimal  Flow  Distribution.  This  step  assigns  a  design  flow  to  every  pipe  in  the  system. 
Considering that in a looped network a specific hydraulic gradient surface could be obtained by an 
infinite number of continuous diameter configurations (Saldarriaga et al., 2011), it is necessary to 
predefine an  objective  flow  for  each  pipe  in  order  to  obtain a  configuration  that minimizes  costs. 
Therefore,  this  sub-process  pretends  to  find  a  unique  flow  distribution  scheme  that  respects  mass 
conservation and conforms to the optimal power use surface previously obtained. In this case, the 
process is executed using the original graph instead of the spanning tree.  
 
Starting  with  the  sumps,  the  flow  demand  is  divided  into  the  upstream  pipes  according  to  the 
following criterion: Only one pipe will be assigned the largest flow value, while the others will be 
assigned the flow that corresponds to the minimum diameter available (

 

   

 . In order to determine 

the principal pipe (i.e. the pipe that will have the largest portion of the total flow demanded), several 
criterions can be used to evaluate their fitness. Same as in the tree structure step, the function 

   

 

 

is  used,  which  means  that  the  pipe  with  the  biggest  value  of  this  function  will  be  defined  as  the 
principal pipe. For non-sump nodes, the total demand is calculated adding its own flow demand and 
the flow demanded downstream. An iterative-recursive algorithm (IRA) can be used to perform all 
of the calculations with an O(NN) time complexity. At the end of the process, all of the pipes in the 
system must have been assigned an objective flow value. Note that this step has a higher impact in 
the case of looped systems.  
 
As an example, Figure 6 shows the optimal flow distribution that corresponds to the Hanoi network. 
 

 

Figure 6: Optimal flow distribution for the Hanoi network (Flow rates in m

3

/h). 

 
Diameter  Calculation.  This  sub-process  assigns  continuous  diameter  sizes  to  all  pipes.  Having 
predefined  the  objective  head  losses  and  the  design  flow  rate  for  each  pipe  in  the  system,  the 
continuous  diameter  needed  is  given  by  a  straightforward  calculation.  This  calculation  is  explicit 
when  the  Hazen-Williams  equation  is  used  and  iteratively  for  the  Darcy-Weisbach  and  the 
Colebrook-White  equations.  The  resulting  continuous  design  is  in  theory  a  full-operational  WDS, 
with a cost very close to the minimum. Due to the limited availability of diameter sizes, a next step 
is required to transform this “optimal” design to a feasible one. 
 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

Diameter Round-Off. This step consists in approximating each continuous diameter to a discrete 
value  from  the  list  of  commercially  available  diameter  sizes,  which  is  represented  by  the  set 
    { 

 

       

  

}. It was found that rounding to the nearest equivalent flow value offers the best 

results,  even  though  it  can  be  done  following  several  criterions.  This  is  done  by  elevating  the 
diameter values to a power of 2.6, as explained in the Tree Structure step. Unfortunately, this step 
affects drastically the system’s hydraulic behaviour, especially if all the diameter sizes are rounded 
up or down.  
 
Optimization 
This  final  sub-process  has  two  main  goals:  The  first  one  is  to  ensure  every  node  has  a  pressure 
higher than or equal to

  

   

; secondly, it seeks for possible cost reductions. Several criteria could be 

used to establish the order in which pipes diameter values must be increased. It was found that the 
pipes  with  larger  unit  head-loss  difference  between  real  and  objective  values  should  be  changed 
first. The process must continue until the whole system has acceptable pressures. The second part 
executes a two-way sweep starting from the reservoirs going towards the sumps in the direction of 
the flow, and then backwards: The reduction of each pipe’s diameter is considered twice. If any of 
these  changes  entails  a  pressure  deficit  it  must  be  reversed  immediately,  otherwise  it  holds.  To 
make sure minimum pressure is not being violated numerous hydraulic simulations are required.  
 
In  first  place,  the  diameter  size  of  one  pipe  is  increased  iteratively  while  there  are  nodes  with 
pressure  deficit.  Thus,  this  sub-process  requires  the  most  number  of  iteration  of  the  whole 
methodology,  being  necessary  to  run  a  hydraulic  simulation  per  pipe,  for  each  single  diameter 
modification.  This  sole  heuristic  can  be  used  alone  to  obtain  sound  designs,  in  spite  of  this,  it  is 
strongly dependant on the initial pipe configuration. 
 
RESULTS 
The  OPUS  methodology  was  used  on  three  benchmark  systems:  Two-Loop,  Hanoi  and  Balerma. 
Different  configurations  of  the  parameters  defined  on  each  step  of  the  methodology  were  tested, 
looking  for  optimal  designs  with  discrete  diameters  (

    { 

 

       

  

}  contains  only  diameter 

available  at  the  local  market)  and,  in  some  cases,  continuous  ones  (

     

 

)  as  potentially  near 

optimal starting designs for the Round-off and Optimization sub-processes. 
 
Two-Loop 
Detailed  information about this  WDS  can  be  found  in  Alperovits  and  Shamir  (1977).  The  Hazen-
Williams  head-loss  equation  was  used  with  a  roughness  coefficient 

       ,  as  specified  in  the 

mentioned publication, and also the unit prices table for each diameter size was adopted. With these 
values  and  with  a  minimum  allowable  pressure  for  every  node  of  30  m,  the  WDS  was  designed 
using the SOGH algorithm which is the OPUS predecessor methodology. 
 
The optimal discrete design was reached after 51 hydraulic simulations which leaded to a $419,000 
network. The number of hydraulic simulations reported by other authors who also reached this cost 
is shown in Table 1. 
 
Table 1: Reported number of iterations before reaching a cost of $419.000 for the Two-Loop WDS. 

 

Algorithm 

Number of iterations 

Genetic algorithms (Savic & Waters, 1997) 

65,000 

Simulated annealing (Cunha & Sousa, 1999) 

25,000 

Genetic algorithms (Wu & Simpson, 2001) 

7,467 

Shuffled frog leaping (Eusuff & Lansey, 2003) 

11,155 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

Shuffled complex evolution (Liong & Atiquzzaman, 2004) 

1,019 

Genetic algorithms (Reca & Martínez, 2006) 

10,000 

Particle swarm optimization (Suribabu, 2006) 

5,138 

Harmony search (Geem, 2006) 

1,121 

Cross entropy (Perelman & Ostfeld, 2007) 

35,000 

Scatter search (Lin et al., 2007) 

3,215 

Particle swarm harmony search (Geem, 2009) 

204 

Differential evolution (Suribabu C. , 2010) 

4,750 

Honey-bee mating optimization (Mohan, 2010) 

1,293 

SOGH (Ochoa, 2009) 

51 

 
Hanoi 
The Hanoi network was first presented by  Fujiwara and Khang (1990) and similarly to Two-Loop 
network, it has become a well-known benchmark WDS. The head-loss equation commonly used is 
Hazen-Williams  with  a 

       ,  the minimum  pressure  for  the  design  scenario is  30  m and  the 

pipes’ costs can be calculated using a potential function of the diameter with a unit coefficient of 
$1.1/m and an exponent of 1.5. 
 
The least cost continuous design reached for Hanoi presents a cost of  $5,456,806, and is shown in 
Figure  7.  It  is  worth  noting  that  the  continuous  design  involves  diameter  values  higher  than  40 
inches,  which  corresponds  to  the  maximum  allowable  diameter  according  to  Fujiwara  and  Khang 
(1990). Therefore, two different discrete designs were performed: The first one being based on the 
original diameter list, and the second one considering the availability of a 50 inches diameter. 
 

 

Figure 7: Hanoi network least cost continuous design (diameters in inches). 

 
The  OPUS  methodology  for  the  first  case  reached  a  cost  of  $6’147,882.45  after  83  iterations. 
Although this is not the least cost reported, the number of hydraulic simulations needed to reach this 
result is three orders of magnitude smaller than that of other approaches, as can be seen in  Table 2. 
The pipe diameter sizes in inches for this configuration are: 40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 30, 
24, 24, 16, 16, 12, 12, 20, 20, 24, 40, 20, 12, 40, 30, 30, 20, 16, 12, 16, 12, 12, 12, 16 and 30 (these 
diameters are shown in order of pipe identification number). 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

 

Table 2: Reported costs and number of iterations for the Hanoi WDS. 

 

Algorithm 

Cost (millions) 

Number of iterations 

Genetic Algorithm (Savic and Walters, 1997) 

$6.073 

1,000,000 

Simulated annealing (Cunha and Sousa, 1999) 

$6.056 

53,000 

Harmony search (Geem, 2002) 

$6.056 

200,000 

Shuffled frog leaping (Eusuff and Lansey, 2003) 

$6.073 

26,987 

Shuffled complex evolution (Liong & Atiquzzaman, 2004) 

$6.220 

25,402 

Genetic Algorithm (Vairavamoorthy, 2005) 

$6.056 

18,300 

Ant colony optimization (Zecchin et al., 2006) 

$6.134 

35,433 

Genetic Algorithms (Reca & Martínez, 2006) 

$6.081 

50,000 

Genetic Algorithms (Reca et al., 2007) 

$6.173 

26,457 

Simulated annealing (Reca et al., 2007) 

$6.333 

26,457 

Simulated annealing with tabu search (Reca et al., 2007) 

$6.353 

26,457 

Local search with simulated annealing (Reca et al., 2007) 

$6.308 

26,457 

Harmony search (Geem, 2006) 

$6.081 

27,721 

Cross entropy (Perelman & Ostfeld, 2007) 

$6.081 

97,000 

Scatter search (Lin et al., 2007) 

$6.081 

43,149 

Modified GA 1 (Kadu, 2008) 

$6.056 

18,000 

Modified GA 2 (Kadu, 2008) 

$6.190 

18,000 

Particle swarm harmony search (Geem, 2009) 

$6.081 

17,980 

Heuristic based approach (Mohan S. a., 2009) 

$6.701 

70 

Differential evolution (Suribabu C. , 2010) 

$6.081 

48,724 

Honey-bee mating optimization (Mohan, 2010) 

$6.117 

15,955 

Heuristic based approach (Suribabu C. , 2012)  

$6.232 

259 

SOGH (Ochoa, 2009) 

$6.337 

94 

Optimal power use surface (this study) 

$6.173 

83 

 
Extrapolating the cost function for a  50” diameter it would have a unit  cost of $388.91/m. Taking 
this into account, the total cost of the design obtained following the OPUS algorithm was of only 
$5’342,840.13, as the real hydraulic gradient surface resembled the optimal in a higher degree. The 
diameter sizes in inches are: 50, 50, 40, 40, 40, 40, 40, 24, 24, 40, 20, 20, 12, 12, 12, 16, 20, 20, 20, 
40, 16, 12, 40, 30, 24, 20, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12 and 20. 
 
Balerma 
Balerma corresponds to a WDS of an irrigation district in Almería, Spain. The pipe diameter sizes 
commercially  available  for  its  design  are  manufactured  exclusively  in  PVC,  with  an  absolute 
roughness  coefficient  of  0.0025  mm.  The  minimum  pressure  allowable  is  of  20  m  and  the  pipes’ 
costs  are  calculated  using  a  potential  function,  with  a  power  of  2.06.  Its  topology  is  presented  in 
Figure 8. 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

 

 

Figure 8: Topology of the Balerma network. 

 
As a result of implementing the OPUS methodology on this network, a €1.755 millions continuous 
design  was  founded.  Also,  after  executing  the  round-off  and  optimization  processes,  the  optimal 
discrete design was reached requiring 957 hydraulic simulations which leaded to a €2.106 millions 
network. Table 3 presents other reported costs and their respective number of iterations. 
 
 

Table 3: Reported costs and number of iterations for the Balerma WDS. 

Algorithm 

Cost (

€ 

millions)  Number of iterations 

Genetic algorithm (Reca & Martínez, 2006) 

2.302 

10.000.000 

Harmony search (Geem, 2006) 

2.601 

45.400 

Harmony search (Geem, 2006) 

2.018 

10.000.000 

Genetic algorithm (Reca et al., 2007) 

3.738 

45.400 

Simulated annealing (Reca et al., 2007) 

3.476 

45.400 

Simulated annealing with taboo search (Reca et al., 2007) 

3.298 

45.400 

Local search with simulated annealing (Reca et al., 2007) 

4.310 

45.400 

Hybrid discrete dynamically dimensioned search     

(Tolson, 2009) 

1,940 

30,000,000 

Harmony search with particle swarm (Geem, 2009) 

2.633 

45.400 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

SOGH (Ochoa, 2009) 

2.100 

1.779 

Memetic algorithm (Baños, 2010) 

3,120 

45,400 

Genetic heritage evolution by stochastic transmission 

(Bolognesi, 2010) 

2,002 

250,000 

Differential evolution (Zheng, 2012) 

1,998 

2,400,000 

Self-adaptive differential evolution (Zheng, 2012) 

1,983 

1,300,000 

Optimal power use surface (this study) 

2.106 

957 

 

CONCLUSIONS 
The  WDS  least-cost  design  methodology  known  as  Optimal  Power  Use  Surface  (OPUS)  herein 
introduced,  considers  optimal  distribution  pattern  of  flow  in  the  network  as  a  way  of  spending 
energy  properly.  This  approach  differentiates  it  from  metaheuristic  algorithms  that  explore  the 
solution space without considering hydraulic principles. 
 
The methodology significantly reduces the number of iterations and keeps the constructive costs of 
the network significantly close to the minimum. In the case of Hanoi the difference results only of 
1.9% with respect to the lowest cost reported in the literature and with a number of iterations three 
orders of magnitude below.  
 
OPUS  is  a  methodology  that  worked  well  on  large  networks,  making  it  possible  to  minimize 
constructive costs in a very reduced number of iterations. On the other hand, when applied to small 
WDSs, the hydraulics result very affected due to the relative difference between the tree structure 
and  the  real  looped  network.  Taking  into  account  that  the  design  is  executed  based  on  the  open 
network (spanning tree), the final result ends up being governed by the optimization process and not 
by the steps based on hydraulic principles. 
 
This methodology clearly proves that considering hydraulic bases allows the optimization of WDS 
design  to  reduce  significantly  the  number  of  iterations  required.  Theoretical  networks  with  some 
restrictions  that  limit  the  design  possibilities  were  tested  in  this  paper.  For  this  reason,  it  is 
recommended  to  test  this  methodology  on  real  networks  and  including  different  additional 
objectives  such  as  maximizing  reliability  and  minimizing  leakage.  Finally  energy  approaches  can 
also be applied to calibrate models and design system operation. 
 
REFERENCES 
 
Alperovits,  E.,  and  Shamir,  U.  (1977)  Design  of  optimal  water  distribution  systems.  Water 

Resources Research, Vol.13, No.6, pp. 885-900. 

Baños,  C.  G.  (2010).  A  memetic  algorithm  applied  to  the  design  of  water  distribution  networks. 

Applied Soft Computing, 261-266. 

Bolognesi,  A.  e.  (2010).  Genetic  Heritage  Evolution  by  Stochastic  Transmission  in  the  optimal 

design of water distribution networks. Advances in Engineering Software, 792-801. 

Cunha,  M.  a.  (1999).  Water  distribution  network  design  optimization:  Simulated  annealing 

approach. J. Water Resour. Plan. Manage. , 215-221. 

Eusuff,  M.  a.  (2003).  Optimization  of  water  distribution  network  design  using  the  shuffled  frog 

leaping algorithm. J. Water Resour. Plan. Manage. , 210-225. 

Fujiwara,  O.  and  Khang,  D.  (1990).  A  two  phase  decomposition  methods  for  optimal  design  of 

looped water distribution networks. Water Resources Research, Vol.26, No. 4, pp. 539-549. 

Geem,  Z.  K.  (2002).  Harmony  search  optimization:  Application  to  pipe  network  design.  Int.  J. 

Model. Simulat. , 125-133. 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

Geem,  Z.  K.  (2006).  Optimal  cost  design  of  water  distribution  networks  using  harmony  search. 

Engineering Optimization, Vol.38, No.3, pp. 259-277. 

Geem,  Z.  K.  (2009).  Particle-swarm  harmony  search  for  water  network  design.  Engineering 

Optimization, Vol.41, No.4, pp. 297-311. 

Kadu,  M.  R.  (2008).  Optimal  design  of  water  networks  using  a  modified  genetic  algorithm  with 

reduction in search space. J. Water Resour. Plan. Manage. , 147-160. 

Lin,  M.,  Liu,  G.  and  Chu,  C.,  (2007)  Scatter  search  heuristic  for  least-cost  design  of  water 

distribution networks, Engineering Optimization, Vol.39, No.7, pp. 857-876. 

Liong, S. and Atiquzzaman, M. (2004) Optimal design of water distribution network using shuffled 

complex evolution. Journal of the Institution of Engineers, Vol.44, No.1, pp. 93-107. 

Mohan,  S.  a.  (2010).  Optimal  water  distribution  network  design  with  Honey-Bee  mating 

optimization. J. Water Resour. Plan. Manage., 117-126. 

Mohan,  S.  a.  (2009).  Water  distribution  network  design  using  heuristics-based  algorithm.  J. 

Comput.Civ. Eng., 249-257. 

Ochoa,  S.  (2009).  Optimal  design  of  water  distribution  systems  based  on  the  optimal  hydraulic 

gradient  surface  concept.  MSc  Thesis,  dept.  of  Civil  and  Environmental  Engineering, 
Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Col. (In Spanish). 

Perelman,  L.  and  Ostfeld,  A.  (2007).  An  adaptive  heuristic  cross  entropy  algorithm  for  optimal 

design of water distribution systems. Engineering Optimization, Vol.39, No.4, pp. 413-428. 

Reca,  J.  and  Martínez,  J.  (2006).  Genetic  algorithms  for  the  design  of  looped  irrigation  water 

distribution networks. Water Resources Research, Vol.44, W05416. 

Reca,  J.,  Martínez,  J.,  Gil,  C.  and  Baños,  R.  (2007).  Application  of  several  meta-heuristic 

techniques  to  the  optimization  of  real  looped  water  distribution  networks.  Water  Resources 
Management
, Vol.22, No.10, pp. 1367-1379. 

Saldarriaga, J.  (1998 and  2007).  Hidráulica  de  Tuberías. Abastecimiento  de Agua,  Redes, Riegos

Ed. Alfaomega. Ed. Uniandes. ISBN: 978-958-682-680-8. 

Saldarriaga,  J.,  Takahashi,  S.,  Hernández,  F.  and  Escovar,  M.  (2011).  Predetermining  pressure 

surfaces in water distribution system design. In Proceedings of the World Environmental and 
Water Resources Congress 2011, ASCE

Savic,  D.  and  Walters,  G.  (1997).  Genetic  algorithms  for  least  cost  design  of  water  distribution 

networks. J. Water Resour. Plan. Manage., 67-77. 

Suribabu,  C.  a.  (2006).  Design  of  water  distribution  networks  using  particle  swarm  optimization. 

Urban Water Journal, 111-120. 

Suribabu,  C.  (2010).  Differential  evolution  algorithm  for  optimal  design  of  water  distribution 

networks. J. of Hydroinf., 66-82. 

Suribabu, C. (2012).  Heuristic Based Pipe Dimensioning Model for Water Distribution Networks. 

Journal of Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice, 45 p. 

Takahashi,  S.,  Saldarriaga,  S.,  Hernández,  F.,  Díaz,  D.  and  Ochoa,  S.  (2010).  An  energy 

methodology  for  the  design  of  water  distribution  systems.  In  Proceedings  of  the  World 
Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2010, ASCE
.  

Tolson,  B.  A.  (2009).  Hybrid  discrete  dynamically  dimensioned  search  (HD-DDS)  algorithm  for 

water distribution system design optimization. Water Resources Research, 45 p. 

Vairavamoorthy,  K.  a.  (2005).  Pipe  index  vector:  A  method  to  improve  genetic-algorithm-based 

pipe optimization. J. Hydraul. Eng., 1117-1125. 

Villalba,  G.  (2004).  Optimal  combinatory  algorithms  applied  to  the  design  of  water  distribution 

systems.  MSc  Thesis,  dept.  of  Systems  and  Computation  Engineering,  Universidad  de  los 
Andes. 

Wu,  I.  (1975).  Design  of  drip  irrigation  main  lines.  Journal  of  Irrigation  and  Drainage  Division

Vol.101, No.4, pp. 265-278. 

Wu, Z. and Simpson, A. (2001). Competent genetic evolutionary optimization of water distribution 

systems. Journal of computing in civil engineering. Vol.15, No.2, 2001, pp. 89-101. 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/59a7a974b16e964cfee2ae5d7f43b703/index-html.html
background image

Yates, D., Templeman, A. and Boffey, T. (1984). The computational complexity of the problem of 

determining  least capital  cost  designs  for  water  supply  networks.  Engineering  Optimization
Vol. 7, No.2, pp. 142-155. 

Zecchin,  A.,  Simpson,  A.,  Maier,  H.,  Leonard,  M.,  Roberts,  A.,  and  Berrisfors,  M.  (2006) 

Application  of  two  ant  colony  optimization  algorithms  to  water  distribution  system 
optimization. Mathematical and Computer Modeling, Vol.44, No. 5-6, pp. 451-468. 

Zheng,  F.  e.  (2012).  A  Self

‐Adaptive  Differential  Evolution  Algorithm  Applied  to  Water 

Distribution System Optimization. Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering, 45 p. 

 
 

87543

¿Quiere saber más? Contáctenos

Declaro haber leído y aceptado la Política de Privacidad