Prioritizing inspection of sewer pipes based on self-cleansing criteria.

Sewer systems performance is a constant challenge for water utilities, due to the changing environment and the low flexibility

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at

https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=nurw20

Urban Water Journal

ISSN: (Print) (Online) Journal homepage: https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/nurw20

Prioritizing inspection of sewer pipes based on

self-cleansing criteria

Sergio Vanegas, Carlos Montes & Juan Saldarriaga

To cite this article:

 Sergio Vanegas, Carlos Montes & Juan Saldarriaga (2022): Prioritizing

inspection of sewer pipes based on self-cleansing criteria, Urban Water Journal, DOI:

10.1080/1573062X.2022.2035408
To link to this article:  https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2022.2035408

Published online: 13 Feb 2022.

Submit your article to this journal 

Article views: 41

View related articles 

View Crossmark data

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Prioritizing inspection of sewer pipes based on self-cleansing criteria

Sergio Vanegas

, Carlos Montes

and Juan Saldarriaga

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia

ABSTRACT

This  paper aims  to develop  a sediment  deposits hydraulic  deterioration model  based  on  self-cleansing 
criteria to prioritize the inspection of sewer systems. The model was trained with benchmarking literature 
values from earlier experiments and validated with household connections complaints data from Bogotá, 
Colombia.  Recursive  Feature  Elimination  with  Cross-Validation  (RFECV)  and  Bayesian  Optimization  (BO) 
were used to construct a Random Forest (RF) model to predict, at pipe level, the likelihood for a pipe to 
present  sediment  deposits.  To  evaluate  the  model’s  prediction  accuracy,  two  different  performance 
indicators  were  used:  (i)  the  Percentage  of  Effective  Inspections,  and  (ii)  Pipes  per  Inspection  with 
sediments. The sediment deposits hydraulic deterioration model shows good overall performance with 
buffer zones radiuses of 250 m predicting which pipes tend to present sediment deposits over time. This 
model improves the understanding of sediment deposits in hydraulic deterioration models and can be 
used to prioritize inspection of sewer systems.

ARTICLE HISTORY 

Received 18 March 2021  
Accepted 24 January 2022 

KEYWORDS 

Urban drainage; data 
management; non-cohesive 
sediment transport; self- 
cleansing sewer pipes

Introduction

Sewer  systems  performance  is  a  constant  challenge  for  water 
utilities, due to the changing environment and the low flexibility 
in  space  for  infrastructure  associated  with  constraints  in  terrain 
gradients  and  fixed  locations  (Tscheikner-Gratl  et  al. 

2019

).  As 

a  result,  collecting  information  from  sewer  systems  is  both 
expensive  and  time-consuming  for  water  utilities  (Hahn  et  al. 

2002

;  Elmasry,  Zayed,  and  Hawari 

2018

).  Those  utilities  have 

traditionally  addressed  the  inspection  of  sewer  systems  with 
a  reactive  approach  (Ariaratnam,  El-Assaly,  and  Yang 

2001

Rodríguez et al. 

2012

) or a poor proactive approach (Tscheikner- 

Gratl et al. 

2019

), which represent an inefficient expend of limited 

funds.  Consequently,  prioritizing  inspection  with  available  data 
from sewer systems is important for a cost-effective strategy to 
ensure the network is functioning appropriately.

To address this issue, several authors have developed struc-

tural  and  hydraulic  deterioration  models  for  sewer  systems. 
Structural  deterioration  models  (Ariaratnam,  El-Assaly,  and 
Yang 

2001

;  Tran,  Ng,  and  Perera 

2007

;  Zhou  et  al. 

2008

Harvey  and  McBean 

2014

;  Caradot  et  al. 

2017

;  Yin  et  al. 

2020

are more common and are related to structural defects, such as 
surface  damage,  cracks  and  fractures.  Hydraulic  deterioration 
models  are  commonly  used  to  complement  structural  dete-
rioration  models  (Hahn  et  al. 

2002

;  Berardi  et  al. 

2008

;  Hawari 

et  al. 

2017

;  Elmasry,  Hawari,  and  Zayed 

2017

;  Elmasry,  Zayed, 

and  Hawari 

2018

;  Daher  et  al. 

2018

;  Ghavami,  Borzooei,  and 

Maleki 

2020

). The latter are related to operational defects, such 

as  infiltration,  soil  intrusion,  tree  root  intrusion  and  sediment 
deposits, which reduce the hydraulic capacity of sewer pipes. In 
general, structural and hydraulic deterioration models are used 
in asset management to prioritize inspection of sewer systems 
to ensure acceptable network performance.

Existing models can be classified, according to their model-

ling  technique,  into  three  categories  (Tscheikner-Gratl  et  al. 

2019

):  (i)  deterministic,  (ii)  statistical  and  (ii)  Artificial 

Intelligence  (AI)  models.  Deterministic  models  aim  to  under-
stand  the  physical  mechanisms  leading  to  pipe  deterioration, 
which implies the collection of accurate data under controlled 
environments for measuring specific variables. Statistical mod-
els  require  less  precise  information  as  they  define  the  model 
structure, in terms of input variables processing, prior to train-
ing.  AI  models  can  determine  complex  interactions  between 
variables without making assumptions (Tran 

2007

), which tends 

to  increase  their  predictive  capacity.  Most  authors  have  built 
statistical  or  AI  models  using  information  related  to  historical 
pipe  performance,  which  is  usually  collected  and  stored  by 
water  utilities  through  closed-circuit  television  (CCTV) 
inspections.

In general, sewer pipe deterioration is a continuous process 

affected  by  several  aspects  that  are  difficult  to  measure  in 
practice. This makes the development of deterioration models 
a  challenging  task.  Most  of  the  models  developed  have  been 
trained  with  historical  data  collected  by  water  utilities,  which 
makes  them  rely  on  the  frequency  and  distribution  of  past 
events. As the training data of the models is based on historical 
events,  their  performance  does  not  depend  on  the  complete 
understanding  of  the  deterioration  phenomena  (Rodríguez 
et  al. 

2012

).  In  contrast,  model  accuracy  is  directly  dependent 

on the quality of historical data collected in-situ. Usually, these 
deterioration  models  tend  to  show  poor  generalisation  and 
extrapolation  capabilities,  i.e.  accuracy  is  quickly  lost  when 
applied  to  external  datasets  (Tscheikner-Gratl  et  al. 

2019

).  As 

a result, existing models can only be used in the sewer system 
of the site where the data was collected.

CONTACT 

Juan Saldarriaga 

jsaldarr@uniandes.edu.co

URBAN WATER JOURNAL                                  
https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2022.2035408

© 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

To address this issue, specifically the poor generalisation of 

models, benchmarking experimental data is used for modelling 
sediment deposits that contributes to the process of hydraulic 
deterioration.  This  operational  defect  is  one  of  the  most  com-
mon  hydraulic  challenges  in  sewer  systems,  which  can  form 
blockages  that  reduce  the  pipes’  hydraulic  capacity  and  may 
cause  premature  overflows  (Tran 

2007

;  Banasiak 

2008

Rodríguez  et  al. 

2012

;  Elmasry,  Hawari,  and  Zayed 

2017

Montes,  Kapelan,  and  Saldarriaga 

2019

).  As  an  example, 

Rodríguez  et  al.  (

2012

)  found  that  54%  of  effective  sediment- 

related failures (effective blockages) in Bogotá, Colombia, were 
related  to  sewer  pipes;  the  other  24%  and  22%  of  effective 
blockages  were  related  to  gully  pots  and  manholes,  respec-
tively. Based on this, the development of a tool to prioritize the 
inspection  of  sediment  deposits  in  pipes  is  important  to  pre-
vent  uncontrolled  hydraulic  deterioration  due  to  this  opera-
tional defect.

This  paper  seeks  to  develop  a  sediment  deposits  hydraulic 

deterioration model based on non-deposition sediment trans-
port  concepts  to  prioritize  the  inspection  of  sewer  systems. 
Experimental  data  of  non-deposition  without  deposited  bed 
and  non-deposition  with  deposited  bed  was  collected  from 
literature  to  train  a  model  that  computes  the  likelihood  of 
both  conditions.  This  approach  permitted  predicting  the  like-
lihood  of  a  pipe  having  sediment  deposits  under  different 
hydraulic conditions as the non-deposition with sediment bed 
condition  is  near  the  condition  where  permanent  sediment 
deposits  are  formed.  To  measure  the  predictive  capacity 
under  pragmatic  conditions  to  emulate  the  normal  operation 
of  a  system,  the  model  was  implemented  in  one  zone  of  the 
stormwater  sewer  system  in  Bogotá,  Colombia.  The  aim  is  to 
improve  the  understanding  of  sediment  deposits  in  hydraulic 
deterioration  models  and  to  use  this  knowledge  to  prioritize 
the  inspection  of  sewer  systems.  In  general,  the  developed 
model  can  show  water  utilities  which  areas  they  should  have 
under supervision according to their inspections and different 
hydraulic conditions.

Methodology

Self-cleansing criteria concepts

To improve the understanding of sediment deposits in hydrau-
lic  deterioration  models,  non-deposition  sediment  transport 
concepts  were  used.  This  field  of  research  has  been  studied 
by  several  authors  (Ab  Ghani 

1993

;  Vongvisessomjai, 

Tingsanchali,  and  Babel 

2010

;  Ebtehaj  and  Bonakdari 

2016

Montes  et  al. 

2020a

2020b

)  who  have  developed  regression- 

based models using  experimental data collected at laboratory 
scale, to describe the behaviour of particles under certain flow 
conditions, especially under steady flow conditions. In general, 
Robinson and Graf (

1972

) identified two flow regimes: (i) non- 

deposition  and  (ii)  deposition.  The  threshold  between  both 
flow  regimes  is  determined  by  the  critical  velocity,  which  is 
related  to  the  critical  condition  where  particles  begin  to  form 
a transitional bed at the bottom of the pipe. As these deposits 
reduce the hydraulic capacity of pipes, sewer systems are com-
monly designed under the non-deposition regime, where flow 
velocities are higher than the critical velocity. This flow regime 

has  been  classified  into  two  subgroups  (Safari,  Mohammadi, 
and Ab Ghani 

2018

): (i) non-deposition without deposited bed 

and (ii) non-deposition with deposited bed.

The  first  group,  non-deposition  without  deposited  bed,  is 

a conservative approach for designing self-cleansing sewers in 
which  sediment  particles  move  separately  and  slowly  at  the 
bottom  of  the  pipe,  i.e.  without  forming  a  permanent  or 
a  transitional  sediment  deposit  bed.  Several  authors  (Mayerle 

1988

; Ab Ghani 

1993

; May 

1993

; Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, 

and Babel 

2010

; Montes et al. 

2020a

2020b

) have studied these 

conditions  to  predict  the  minimum  self-cleansing  velocity  for 
this flow regime. In general, these studies carried out extensive 
experimental  research  varying  both  sediment  and  flume/pipe 
properties, as shown in 

Table 1

. With the data collected, several 

regression-based models to predict the sediment velocity that 
generates  non-deposition  without  sediment  bed  conditions 
were developed.

The  second  group  is  less  conservative  and  allows 

a transitional deposited loose bed as bedload. Several authors 
(May et  al. 

1989

;  El-Zaemey 

1991

;  Ab  Ghani 

1993

;  Butler,  May, 

and  Ackers 

1996

)  have  found  that  a  mean  proportional  sedi-

ment depth (y

s

=

D) close to 1.0% of the pipe diameter, increases 

the sediment transport capacity. In contrast to non-deposition 
without  deposited  bed,  this  flow  regime  is  near  the  critical 
condition,  and  regular  supervision  of  the  systems  is  required 
for preventing the formation of permanent sediment deposits 
(Vongvisessomjai,  Tingsanchali,  and  Babel 

2010

).  In  this  con-

text,  several  studies  (Perrusquia 

1991

;  El-Zaemey 

1991

;  Ab 

Ghani 

1993

;  Montes  et  al. 

2020b

)  carried  out  at  laboratory 

scale  have  studied  this  sediment  transport  mode  varying  the 
inlet conditions, as seen in 

Table 1

. In the same manner, these 

studies  developed  different  models  to  predict  the  sediment 
velocity  under  different  hydraulic  conditions  and  sediment 
characteristics  that  generate  non-deposition  with  sediment 
bed conditions.

In general, non-deposition without deposited bed and non- 

deposition  with  deposited  bed  have  been  studied  indepen-
dently at laboratory scale as they are two different approaches 
for designing self-cleansing sewer pipes. Nevertheless, there is 
no  quantitative  threshold  between  these  subgroups  since  the 
transition between them is  almost imperceptible and requires 
complete knowledge of the phenomena to be able to identify 
it. In this study, as there is no numerical expression for this limit, 
the  data-driven  Random  Forest  (RF)  technique  is  used  to  pre-
dict  the  likelihood  of  each  flow  regime  (i.e.  non-deposition 
without  deposited  bed  and  non-deposition  with  sediment 
bed)  under  different  flow  conditions.  As  the  non-deposition 
with deposited bed criteria is near the critical condition where 
stationary deposits are formed, this classification model can be 
used  to  develop  a  sediment  deposits  hydraulic  deterioration 
model  that,  combined  with  Geographic  Information  Systems 
(GIS) can be implemented to prioritize the inspection of sewer 
systems. More details of the implementation are given below.

Literature data

Literature  data  for  both  non-deposition  conditions  were  col-
lected to train the RF model. 

Table 1 

is modified from Montes, 

Kapelan,  and  Saldarriaga  (

2021

)  and  summarize  this 

information.

2

S. VANEGAS ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

As  shown  in 

Table  1

,  results  from  541  and  408  tests  were 

collected for non-deposition without deposited bed and non- 
deposition  with  deposited  bed,  respectively.  In  general,  the 
following  input  variables  were  obtained  for  each  test:  d  the 
mean  particle  diameter,  SG  the  specific  gravity  of  the  sedi-
ment,  S

the  pipe  slope,  D  the  pipe  diameter,  Y  the  water 

level,  R  the  hydraulic  radius,  V  the  flow  velocity,  λ  the  Darcy 
friction factor, and C

the volumetric sediment  concentration. 

Then,  additional  parameters  such  as,  D

gr 

the  dimensionless 

grain  size  and  τ  the  shear  stress  were  computed.  The  initial 
training  dataset  has  949  reference  values  collected  from  the 
literature.  However,  as  the  training  dataset  only  considers 
a  limited  number  of  combinations  between  hydraulic  condi-
tions,  pipe  characteristics  and  sediment  properties,  its  size 
directly  affects  the  capabilities  of  extrapolation  for 
a  Machine  Learning  (ML)  model.  Models’  performance  tend 
to  increase  with  more  data,  but  more  data  does  not  always 
imply  an  increase  in  performance;  the  quality  of  additional 
data and data pre-processing are equally important (Zhu et al. 

2016

).

To address this issue, data augmentation based on physical 

knowledge  of  non-deposition  flow  regimes  was  used  to  gen-
erate  new  records.  The  above  means  that  new  records  were 
created  based  on  the  known  physical  principles  of  non- 
deposition  flow  regimes.  The  parameters  that  were  constant 
through this procedure were DS

and C

v

, while the filling ratio 

of the pipe and the sediment characteristics varied. These two 
parameters were varied because during experimental test col-
lection  in  the  study  of  Montes  et  al.  (

2020b

),  it  was  observed 

that certain changes in both parameters do not affect the non- 
deposition flow regime. The non-deposition without deposited 
bed condition is preserved when the filling ratio changed from 
the  observed  value  in  the  experimental  test  until  it  reached 
85% with interval increases of 1% and with all the particles with 
lower  mean  diameter  from  the  observed.  The  non-deposition 
with deposited bed condition is preserved when the filling ratio 
changed from the observed value in the experimental test until 
it  reached  1%  with  interval  decreases  of  1%  and  with  all  the 
particles  with  greater  mean  diameter  from  the  observed.  The 
above was considered since this behaviour was observed dur-
ing  the  experiments  carried  out  by  the  authors  in  previous 
research  (Montes  et  al. 

2020a

2020b

).  With  this  approach, 

454,595  different  combinations  of  parameters  were  obtained 
to train the model.

Sediment deposits hydraulic deterioration model

RF  is  a  supervised  ML  algorithm  proposed  by  Breiman  (

2001

which consists of a combination of decision trees, where each 
tree  is  generated  from  identically  distributed  random  vectors. 
These  vectors  are  used  to  select  training  samples  and  input 
variables  for  each  tree.  With  this  approach,  an  ensemble  of 
decision  trees  is  generated,  where  each  tree  computes  the 
output  variable  and  the  result  is  given  by  the  average  of  all 
the  ensemble  (James  et  al. 

2013

).  This  procedure  allows  RF  to 

find  non-linear  relations  between  variables  and  reduce  model 
variance.  However,  RF  performance  is  directly  dependent  on 
the  input  variables  and  the  definition  of  the  hyperparameters 
(e.g.  maximum  node  depth  and  the  number  of  trees,  among 
others).  To  overcome  these  issues,  Recursive  Feature 
Elimination  with  Cross-Validation  (RFECV)  and  Bayesian 
Optimization  (BO)  were  used,  respectively.  Then,  the  Receiver 
Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed to deter-
mine the likelihood cut-off (threshold for classification). Finally, 
the obtained RF model was integrated with GIS tools, such as: 
feature  selection,  buffer  analysis,  intersect  analysis,  feature 
layer  creation,  spatial  join,  and  mapping. 

Figure  1 

shows  the 

implementation  of  the  hydraulic  deterioration  model  devel-
oped  here.  More  details  of  the  methods  used  are  described 
below.

RFECV  is  a  combination  of  Recursive  Feature  Elimination 

(RFE)  and  Cross  Validation  (CV).  RFE  is  a  greedy  search  back-
ward  selection  method  that  was  introduced  by  Guyon  et  al. 
(

2002

)  to  improve  the  selection  of  input  variables  and  reduce 

computational  costs  associated  with  this  process.  In  general, 
this algorithm trains a classifier, then computes a scoring metric 
for each input variable and finally removes the least important 
one.  This  method  was  then  combined  with  a  CV  resampling 
method, which allows the creation of training and testing sub-
sets for each RFE iteration. Specifically, Stratified K Fold CV with 
k ¼ 3  was  used  for  this  procedure,  which  divides  the  original 
data in three subsets, including training, testing, and preserving 
the percentage of samples for each class. The accuracy CV score 
defined in Equation (1) was selected as scoring metric. Since the 
RF  model  predicts  the  likelihood  of  non-deposition  without 
deposited  bed  and  non-deposition  with  sediment  bed  under 
different  flow  conditions,  a  prediction  is  considered  correct 
when a certain flow condition of the testing subset is classified 
according to the likelihood cut-off (threshold for classification) 
in the same flow regime as claimed in the testing subset. 

Table 1. 

Collected experimental data.

Reference

Non-deposition criterion

No. of tests

Pipe diameter (mm)

Particles diameter (mm)

Pipe slope (%)

Water level (mm)

Mayerle (

1988

)

Without deposited bed

106

152

0.50–8.74

0.14–0.56

28–122

May (

1993

)

Without deposited bed

27

450

0.73

0.04–0.30

222–338

Ab Ghani (

1993

)

Without deposited bed

221

154, 305 and 405

0.46–8.30

0.04–2.56

23–338

Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, 

and Babel (

2010

)

Without deposited bed

36

100 and 150

0.20–0.43

0.20–0.06

20–60

Montes et al. (

2020a

)

Without deposited bed

44

242

1.33–1.51

0.2–0.8

24–161

Montes et al. (

2020b

)

Without deposited bed

107

595

0.35–2.6

0.04–3.43

11–218

Perrusquia (

1991

)

With deposited bed

38

225

0.9

0.02–0.06

23–115

El-Zaemey (

1991

)

With deposited bed

290

305

0.53–8.40

0.18–0.44

39–203

Ab Ghani (

1993

)

With deposited bed

26

450

0.73

0.07–0.47

204–345

Montes et al. (

2020b

)

With deposited bed

54

595

0.47–2.60

0.46–5.42

14–91

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

3

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

Accuracy CV score ¼

Correct predictions in test dataset

Total number of predictions in test dataset

(1) 

For this process, the RF was trained with 100 trees with the Gini 
Impurity index as the main criterion for measuring the quality of 
a  split  and  with  no  restriction  over  the  maximum  depth.  The 
Python  library  scikit-learn  (Pedregosa  et  al. 

2015

)  was  used  for 

implementing  RFECV  and  RF  algorithms. 

Figure  2(a

)  shows  the 

accuracy CV score for each number of selected features in RFECV, 
the possible features for the model were: dSGS

o

DYRVλD

gr 

and  τ.  The  highest  CV  score  was  obtained  for  four  selected 
features: DYV  and λ

Figure 2(b

) shows the importance of the 

selected  features,  computed  with  the  Gini  Impurity  Index.  As 
shown  in  this  figure,  the  most  important  features  are  the  flow 
velocity,  i.e.  the  mean  velocity  of  the  pipe  computed  with  the 
filling ratio and the Darcy Weisbach – Colebrook White coupled 
equation for part-full flow, and the pipe diameter, respectively.

BO is a sequential optimization method that commonly uses 

Gaussian  Processes  (GP)  to  fit  an  unknown  objective  function 
(Wang et al. 

2016

). BO uses GP approximation to lead explora-

tion of solution space for areas that are expected to give more 
information  about  the  solution  space,  which  is  then  used  to 
update  the  distributions  of  the  approximated  objective  func-
tion  (Garrido-Merchán  and  Hernández-Lobato 

2020

).  As  the 

objective function for RF hyperparameter tuning is an unknown 
non-convex  function,  BO  is  used  for  selecting  the  hyperpara-
meters. For this process, the RF algorithm was trained with the 
input  variables  obtained  from  RFECV.  Additionally,  RF  hyper-
parameters  and  their  space  of  solutions  were  defined  as  fol-
lows: (i) number of trees, integer solution between 100 and 400; 
and  (ii)  maximum  depth,  integer  solution  between  3  and  10. 

The  Python  libraries  scikit-learn  (Pedregosa  et  al. 

2015

)  and 

scikit-optimize  (Head  et  al. 

2018

)  were  used  for  implementing 

RF  algorithm  and  BO,  respectively.  For  the  BO  process,  5  ran-
dom starts, 15 iterations and accuracy as metric were defined as 
parameters. The obtained hyperparameters were: (i) number of 
trees equivalent to 400 and (ii) maximum depth of 5.

ROC curve is a graphical analysis tool that plots the relation-

ship  between  true  positive  rate  (TPR)  and  false-positive  rate 
(FPR) for a classification model considering different likelihood 
cut-offs. 

Figure  2(c

)  shows  the  ROC  curve  for  the  RF  model 

using  the  input  variables  from  the  RFECV  and  the  hyperpara-
meters  from  BO.  This  analysis  is  used  to  select  the  likelihood 
cut-off that best fits the model requirements. This value will be 
used as the threshold for the classification in the RF model. As 
predicting  false  positives  pipes  is  associated  to  an  inefficient 
use of funds, a likelihood cut-off of 0.55 is selected, with a TPR 
of 0.839 and a FPR of 0.000.

The obtained RF model is integrated with GIS tools to obtain 

the  sediment  deposits  hydraulic  deterioration  model.  In  gen-
eral,  this  process  is  made  using  arcpy  Python  library  from 
ArcGIS,  which  allows  to  integrate  GIS  files  and  use  them  as 
input for the classification model. Additionally, the predictions 
made with the RF model are integrated with two GIS features: 
the network connectivity matrix and buffer zones. The network 
connectivity  matrix  makes  possible  the  consideration  of  pipes 
surroundings  at  underground  level.  This  is  important  for  the 
sediment  deposits  predictions,  as  this  operational  defect 
reduces the hydraulic capacity of a pipe, which directly affects 
adjacent  pipes.  Buffer  zones  are  used  to  delimit  the  influence 
area of water utilities inspections, which permits the model to 
have  real-time  data  of  the  pipes  that  can  present  sediment 
deposits  and  those  that  have  been  recently  inspected.  Using 

Figure 1. 

Sediment deposits hydraulic deterioration model development.

4

S. VANEGAS ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

this approach, the likelihood of a pipe having sediment depos-
its  under  different  hydraulic  conditions  can  be  predicted  at 
pipe level.

Discrete dynamic  simulation and performance measures

A  discrete  dynamic  simulation  was  built  to  evaluate  the 
model  performance  over  time.  This  discrete  dynamic  simu-
lation  consisted  of  integrating  the  RF  model  with  GIS  tools 
to  simulate  the  network  sediment  deposits  state  at  pipe 
level  by  days.  For  this  process,  the  following  parameters 
were  defined:  (i)  starting  date,  (ii)  number  of  time  steps, 
(iii)  timesteps  for  the  RF  model,  (iv)  radiuses  of  the  buffer 
zones  for  inspections  that  are  used  to  create  areas  in  which 
inspections  are  considered  effective  (i.e.  an  inspection  in 
which  sediment  deposits  have  been  found),  (v)  maintenance 
time  frame  for  inspections  that  defines  the  number  of  time-
steps  in  which  the  buffer  zone  of  an  inspection  is  active, 
which  means  that  the  pipes  within  the  buffer  zone  are  not 
considered  as  candidates  for  developing  sediment  deposits 
during  this  time  frame,  (vi)  sediment  deposits  likelihood 
increasing  factor  that  emulates  the  reduction  in  the  hydrau-
lic  capacity  pipes  caused  by  physical  impact  of  sediment 
deposits  in  adjacent  pipes.  For  example,  an  increasing  factor 
of  1.10  means  that  the  likelihood  of  developing  sediment 
deposits  is  10%  higher  than  otherwise  and  (vii)  performance 
measures  for  each  timestep  of  the  simulation.

For each day in the simulation time, the sediment deposits 

hydraulic  deterioration  model  verifies  which  inspections  were 
made by the Empresa de Acueducto y Alcantarillado de Bogotá 
(EAB),  and  creates  a  buffer  zone  around  records  for  that 
specific  day  with  a  defined  radius  and  a  maintenance  time 
frame.  During  this  time  frame,  the  buffer  zone  is  active  which 
means  he  pipes  within  this  area  are  not  considered  for  the 
prediction of the state for sediment deposits. In general, these 
predictions are made under random hydraulic conditions, gen-
erated  specifically  with  a  random  filling  ratio,  where  the  like-
lihood of a pipe to have sediment deposits is computed every 
timesteps.  The  likelihood  is  affected  by  an  increasing  factor 
which  is  computed  only  if  the  pipe  that  is  being  simulated 
has an adjacent pipe with sediment deposits according to the 
model.  If  the  RF  model  classifies  the  state  of  a  pipe  as  ‘with 
sediment  deposits’,  this  state  is  preserved  until  the  pipe  is 
inspected.  A  pipe  is  inspected  once  it  is  within  a  buffer  zone 

of  an  inspection.  Additionally,  for  each  day  the  following  out-
puts are computed according to the starting date (t) and num-
ber of days that the simulation has been running (δ):

Total Inspections (TI

t;tþδ

):  Defined as the  total number of 

registered inspections from t  to þ δ.

Failed Inspections (FI

t;tþδ

): Defined as the total number of 

failed inspections from to þ δ. An inspection is consid-
ered  as  non-satisfactory  if  there  are  no  pipes  with  sedi-
ment  deposits  within  the  radius  of  the  defined  buffer 
zone,  which  means  that  the  inspection  made  by  the 
water  utility  did  not  found  any  pipe  that  needed  to  be 
cleansed. It is important to point out that the simulations 
works only with inspections related with the cleansing of 
the stormwater sewer system.

Pipes  with  sediments  confirmed  by  inspection  (IP

t;tþδ

): 

Defined as the total number of inspected pipes with sedi-
ments from to þ δ. A pipe is considered with sediments 
confirmed by inspection if it was within the defined buffer 
zone radius with sediment deposits, which means that the 
inspection made by the water utility found at least one pipe 
that needed to be cleansed in the buffer zone.

With these outputs, the following performance measures for 

each simulation day are defined to evaluate model’s prediction 
accuracy:  Percentage  of  Effective  Inspections  (PEI

t;tþδ

)  and 

Pipes per Inspection with sediments (PP

t;tþδ

). PEI

t;tþδ 

quantifies 

how  many  inspections  were  effective  during  the  simulation, 
while PP

t;tþδ 

shows how many pipes could be cleansed by the 

water utility by inspection with a defined buffer zone radius.

Equations (2) and (3) show these calculations, respectively: 

PEI

t;tþδ

¼

100% �

TI

t;tþδ

FI

t;tþδ

TI

t;tþδ

(2) 

PP

t;tþδ

¼

IP

t;tþδ

TI

t;tþδ

FI

t;tþδ

(3) 

It is  important to  highlight that  some of the outputs from  the 
performance  measures  depend  directly  on  the  buffer  zones 
radiuses.  Therefore,  the  performance  measures  change  when 
the buffer zones radiuses is varied. In general, these measures 
increase with  increases  in the  buffer  zones radiuses.  However, 

Figure 2. 

Sediment deposits hydraulic deterioration model results. (a) Cross Validation Score according to the number of selected features, (b) The features importance 

in the Random Forest model, and (c) The ROC curve for the model.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

5

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

increases  in  the  buffer  zones  radiuses  can  be  related  to  less 
accuracy  in  the  model,  because  more  area  is  needed  to  be 
inspected for each inspection.

For the simulations, the selected starting date was 2019–09- 

09; the total time of simulation were 200 days; the timesteps for 
the  RF  model  was  4  days;  the  maintenance  time  frame  was 
generated  randomly  for  each  register  in  the  database  of  61 
registers  related  with  the  cleansing  of  the  stormwater  system 
from  a  discrete  cumulative  probability  distribution  function 
obtained  from  historical  data;  the  buffer  zones  radiuses  for 
inspections  was  evaluated  for  150  m,  200  m,  and  250  m;  and 
the  sediment  deposits  likelihood  increasing  factor  was  evalu-
ated for 1.10, 1.25 and 1.40. The defined performance measures 
were obtained for each day with ¼ 0 and δ equivalent to the 
simulation day.

Case Study: Zone 1 Bogotá

In this study, the developed sediment deposits hydraulic dete-
rioration  model  was  validated  with  data  from  the  household 
connections’  complaints  database  from  Bogotá.  The  EAB 
divides  the  sewer  system  of  the  city  of  Bogotá  in  five  opera-
tional  zones.  Only  Zone  1  was  selected  for  validating  the 
hydraulic  sediment  deposits  deterioration  model.  This  zone 
has  about  597,592  household  connections,  92%  of  them  are 
classified  as  residential  and  are  distributed  in  an  area  of 
approximately 177 km

2

.

The  GIS  geodatabase  of  the  stormwater  sewer  system  has 

20,939  pipe  sections  with  information  of  diameters,  slopes, 
materials,  invert  elevation,  age,  and  length.  The  total  pipe 
length  of  the  stormwater  sewer  system  is  908  km.  However, 
some  records  had  unknown  or  inconsistent  information,  e.g. 
extremely steep or unknown slopes and/or extremely large or 
unknown diameters. These pipes with missing data were elimi-
nated  to  prevent  using  unknown data  during  the  simulations. 
After  data  cleansing,  15,022  pipe  sections  were  obtained  for 
validating the sediment deposit hydraulic deterioration model. 

Figure 3(a

) shows the distribution of the pipe section slopes in 

the network, which are mostly less than 1%. In total, 5917 were 
not considered for the simulation, however they are distributed 
along  all  the  network  and  do  not  affect  the  general  network 
connectivity. Nevertheless, if in the future the model is going to 
be implemented by a water utility, it is highly recommended to 
have  complete  data  for  the  simulated  network. 

Figure  3(b

shows  the  distribution  of  the  pipe  diameters  in  the  system, 

where  most  values  range  from  300  mm  to  600  mm.  Finally, 

Figure  3(c

)  shows  the  distribution  of  the  pipe  materials  in  the 

stormwater  sewer  system,  where  the  most  common  material 
found is concrete, followed by PVC and clay.

For the case study, the EAB has two main record databases. 

The  first  one  has  maintenance  records  of  sanitary  and  storm-
water sewer pipes from 2008 to 2018, which are used to analyse 
the  behaviour  of  the  network  throughout  time.  The  database 
has  14,810  records  associated  to  sewer  cleansings  between 
2010 and 2018. These records were used to estimate the time 
between inspections adjusting a discrete cumulative probabil-
ity  distribution  function  for  obtaining  the  maintenance  time 
frame  for  the  simulation.  The  second  database  has  61  records 
that  are  inspections  related  with  the  cleansing  of  the  storm-
water  sewer  system.  These  inspections  are  made  by  visual 
inspection  as  soon  as  possible,  according  to  household  con-
nections’ complaints. This database was used to test the model 
developed  here  with  the  assumption  that  each  record  is  an 
inspection  where  the  cleansing  was  effectively  made.  More 
details  about  how  this  database  information  was  used  are 
described in the section below.

Results and discussion

Results

Figure  4 

shows  an  example  of  the  map  results  during  the 

discrete  dynamic  simulation  for  buffer  zones  radiuses  of 
250  m  and  the  sediment  deposits  likelihood  increasing  factor 
equivalent to 1.25. It is important to highlight that in the map 
the pipes with sediment deposits are obtained according to the 
model. 

Figure  4(a

)  shows  a  region  of  the  case  of  study  on 

30 October 2019 where seven inspections are active (the time-
step  is  included  during  the  maintenance  time  frame  of  the 
inspections),  which  means  the  pipes  within  their  buffer  zones 
are  not  considered  as  candidates  for  the  prediction  of  the 
deposition  state. 

Figure  4(b

)  shows  the  same  region  the 

next  day,  where  seven  inspections  are  active,  but  one  of  the 
active  inspections  of  the  previous  day  was  deactivated  (the 
maintenance  time  frame  of  this  inspection  ends)  and  a  new 
inspection  became  active.  Comparing 

Figure  4(a,b

),  when  the 

new  inspection  is  active  in 

Figure  4(b

)  the  pipes  that  the 

deterioration model had identified in previous days with sedi-
ment  deposits  were  cleansed.  On  the  other  hand,  when  the 
other  inspection  was  deactivated,  the  pipes  within  its  buffer 
zone  are  now  considered  by  the  deterioration  model  and 

Figure 3. 

Stormwater sewer system description plots. (a) Slopes Histogram, (b) Diameters Histogram, and (c) Materials Barplot.

6

S. VANEGAS ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

sediment  deposits  are  identified.  Additionally,  from 

Figure  4 

the impact of the likelihood increasing factor can be identified 
as sediment deposits are usually identified on adjacent pipes.

Figure  5 

was  constructed  with  the  values  for  the  perfor-

mance  measures  for  each  day  differentiating  the  values  for 
the buffer zones radiuses and the sediment deposits likelihood 
increasing factor. The curves show the evolution of the perfor-
mance  indicator  over  time.  The  expected  behaviour  is  that 
these  indicators  converge  to  one  value  over  time. 

Figure  5(a, 

b) 

are obtained for buffer zones radiuses of 150 m, 

Figure 5(c,d

are obtained for buffer zones radiuses of 200 m and 

Figure 5(e, 

f

) are obtained for buffer zones radiuses of 250 m. 

Figure 5(a,c 

and  e

)  show  the  behaviour  of  PEI

t;tþδ 

and 

Figure  5(b,d  and  f

show  the  behaviour  of  PP

t;tþδ

,  both  for  different  values  of  the 

sediment  deposits  likelihood  increasing  factor.  The  following 
observations can be made from 

Figure 5

:

The  highest  PEI

0;200 

for  all  the  buffer  zones  radiuses  is 

obtained  with  a  sediment  deposits  likelihood  increasing 
factor  of  1.25.  The  PEI

0;200 

obtained  values  are  65%,  70% 

and 83%; for 150 m, 200 m, and 250 m; respectively. While 
the  lowest  PEI

0;200 

for  all  the  buffer  zones  radiuses  is 

obtained  with  a  sediment  deposits  likelihood  increasing 
factor  of  1.10.  The  PEI

0;200 

obtained  values  are  62%,  68% 

and 80%; for 150 m, 200 m, and 250 m; respectively.

For 

Figure  5(a

)  the  PEI

0;200 

for  all  increasing  factors  are 

around  63%,  for 

Figure  5(c

)  the  PEI

0;200 

for  all  increasing 

factors are around 69% and for 

Figure 5(e

) the PEI

0;200 

for 

all increasing factors are around 82%. As 

Figure 5(a,c and 

e

)  are  constructed  with  buffer  zones  radiuses  of  150  m, 

200  m  and  250  m,  increases  of  5  m  in  the  buffer  zones 
radiuses suggest an increase on average of 1% in PEI

0;200

.

The  highest  PP

0;200 

for  all  the  buffer  zones  radiuses  is 

obtained  with  a  sediment  deposits  likelihood  increasing 
factor of 1.40. The PP

0;200 

obtained values are 2.54 pipes, 

4.22  pipes  and  5.53  pipes; for  150  m,  200  m,  and  250  m; 
respectively.  While  the  lowest  PP

0;200 

for  all  the  buffer 

zones radiuses is obtained with a sediment deposits like-
lihood  increasing  factor  of  1.10.  The  PP

0;200 

obtained 

values  are  2.14  pipes,  3.27  and  4.06;  for  150  m,  200  m, 
and 250 m; respectively.

For 

Figure  5(b

)  the  PP

0;200 

for  all  increasing  factors  are 

around  2.35  pipes,  for 

Figure  5(d

)  the  PP

0;200 

for  all 

increasing  factors  are  around  3.81  pipes,  for 

Figure  5(f

the PP

0;200 

for all increasing factors are around 4.83 pipes. 

As 

Figure  5(b,d  and  f

)  are  constructed  with  buffer  zones 

radiuses of 150 m, 200 m and 250 m, increases of 50 m in 
the buffer zones radiuses suggest an increase on average 
of 1.245 pipes in PP

0;200

.

Discussion

Considering the results presented in 

Figures 4 and 5

, and their 

respective observations, the following remarks are made:

As  it  was  mentioned  in  the  description  of 

Figure  4

,  it  is 

pertinent  to  mention  the  importance  of  the  likelihood 
increasing  factor. 

Figure  4(a,b

)  show  that  the  deterioration 

model tends to identify sediment deposits in adjacent pipes 
due  to  the  likelihood  increasing  factor.  This  is  relevant  for 
the deterioration model because  it emulates the reduction 
in the hydraulic capacity pipes caused by sediment depos-
its.  This  operational  defect  directly  affects  adjacent  pipes 
and pushes toward the creation of more sediment deposits.

In 

Figure 4(a,b

), it can be identified that some regions are 

predisposed to present sediment deposits. This is caused 
by  two  main  aspects:  (i)  the  likelihood  increasing  factor 
and (ii) similarities in pipe characteristics. The first aspect 
was discussed  in the previous  remark and contributes to 
identifying  some  specific  areas  with  sediment  deposits. 
The second aspect is more related to sewer design, where 
in small regions similar pipes characteristics are chosen to 
avoid flow disturbances. As similar pipe characteristics are 
chosen, the obtained hydraulic conditions are also similar. 
This  implies  that  if  a  pipe  tends  to  present  sediment 
deposits,  another  pipe  with  similar  characteristics  is  also 
likely  to  have  this  operational  defect,  which  explains  the 
concentration of sediment deposits in some regions.

Figure  5 

shows that  the best overall  results are  obtained 

with  a  buffer  zones  radiuses  of  250  m  and  an  increasing 
factor of 1.25. 

Figure 5 

also suggest that if the buffer zones 

radiuses is increased the performance measures will tend 

Figure 4. 

Map results example for buffer zone radius 250 m and likelihood increasing factor of 1.25. Stars, circles and wide lines denote the inspections, buffer zone 

radius and pipes with sediment deposits, respectively. (a) Shows the simulation result on 2019–10-30, and (b) Shows the simulation result on 2019–10-31.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

7

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

Figure 5. 

Performance measures. a) and b) for buffer zone radius of 150 m, c) and d) for buffer zone radius of 200 m, e) and f) for buffer zone radius of 250 m.

8

S. VANEGAS ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

to  increase  as  well.  However,  it  is  desirable  to  make  the 
buffer  zones  radiuses  smaller  to  obtain  higher  precision 
for each inspection, which is associated with a better use 
of water utilities funds.

The  obtained  sediment  deposit  hydraulic  deterioration 
model  can be  used  in  any  sewer  network  with  GIS  infor-
mation, as it was trained with benchmarking experimental 
data. This feature makes the model not dependent of any 
sewer  network,  which  fixes  the  poor  generalisation  and 
extrapolation  capabilities  of  other  models.  Nevertheless, 
the  historical data  from  the  sewer networks  can be  used 
to evaluate the model performance measures and assess 
its precision in other sewer networks.

The  sediment  deposit  hydraulic  deterioration  model  can 
be  used  by  water  utilities  to  prioritize  the  inspection  of 
sewer  systems,  as  this  model  identifies  regions  that  are 
predisposed  to  deposition  and  updates  its  results  based 
on the water utilities operation.

Considering  that  predictions  for  each  time  step  are  made 
under  random  hydraulic  conditions,  specifically  a  random 
filling  ratio,  it  is  important  to  highlight  the  importance  of 
simulating  multiple  rounds,  because  this  ensures  that  on 
some  rounds,  the  likely  places  of  sedimentation  will  be 
spotted  by  the  model.  For  further  research,  the  hydraulic 
conditions can be complemented with hydrological models.

Conclusions

This  paper  proposes  a  sediment  deposits  hydraulic  deteriora-
tion  model  based  on  self-cleansing  criteria.  The  model  was 
constructed  with  experimental  data  collected  from  literature 
and was evaluated through a discrete dynamic simulation with 
historical  records  from  the  EAB.  The  model  performance  was 
measured with two indicators, which helped to understand the 
behaviour  of  the  model  along  simulation  time.  The  following 
conclusions are made based on the obtained results:

(1) The  sediment  deposits  hydraulic  deterioration  model 

presented  here  shows  a  good  performance  for  the 
dynamic  discrete  simulation  with  the  EAB  historical 
data. The best overall results were obtained for a buffer 
zones radiuses of 250 m and a sediment deposit increas-
ing factor of 1.25. In general, model performance is not 
sensible to the sediment deposits increasing factor, but 
performance  tends  to  increase  as  the  buffer  zones 
radiuses  increases.  However,  it  is  important  to  remark 
that  it  is  convenient  to  have  smaller  buffer  zones 
radiuses to  obtain  higher  precision for each  inspection, 
as the radiuses of the buffer zones emulates the scope of 
the inspections made by the water utility, which objec-
tive is to be more precise to minimize their costs.

(2) The  experimental  data  collected,  as  well  as  the  data 

augmentation  strategies  were  quite  useful  for  training 
the  sediment  deposits  hydraulic  deterioration  model. 
This  approach  fixes  the  poor  generalisation  and  extra-
polation  capabilities  of  other  models,  as  it  makes  the 
model  independent  of  the  sewer  network  where  it  is 
implemented.

(3) The  most  important  input  variables  for  predicting  the 

sediment  deposits  state  at  pipe  level  for  the  sediment 
deposits  hydraulic  deterioration  model  are  the  flow 
velocity,  the  pipe  diameter,  the  water  level,  and  the 
Darcy  friction  factor.  These  variables  can  be  easily  col-
lected  or  computed  from  sewer  design  and  installed 
sensors in the sewer network.

Based on the above, the sediment deposits hydraulic dete-

rioration model can be useful for prioritizing the inspection of 
sewer  systems,  as  it  shows  good  overall  performance  in  pre-
dicting  which  pipes  tend  to  present  sediment  deposits  with 
different  hydraulic  conditions  over  time.  Further  research  is 
recommended to test the performance of the sediment depos-
its hydraulic deterioration model in different networks. In addi-
tion, it is desirable to preserve or increase the model accuracy 
making the buffer zones radiuses smaller. The obtained model 
can  be  improved  with:  (i)  hydrological  runoff  models,  which 
may  be  more  accurate  in  determining  the  actual  hydraulic 
conditions over pipes, and (ii) recomputing buffer zones using 
distance along the network instead of using radius.

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the EAB, especially the departments of Dirección 
de Información Técnica y Geográfica and Gerencia Zona 1, for providing the 
data used in this study.

Disclosure statement

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the author(s).

ORCID

Sergio Vanegas 

http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5786-9450

Carlos Montes 

http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0758-4697

Juan Saldarriaga 

http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1265-2949

References

Ab Ghani, A. 

1993

. “Sediment Transport in Sewers.” PhD Diss., University of 

Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Ariaratnam, S., A. El-Assaly, and Y. Yang. 

2001

. “Assesment of Infrastructure 

Inspection  Needs  Using  Logistic  Models.”  Journal  of  Infraestructure 
Systems 
7 (4): 160–165. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)1076-0342(2001)7:4(160)

.

Banasiak,  R. 

2008

.  “Hydraulic  Performance  of  Sewer  Pipes  with  Deposited 

Sediments.”  Water  Science  and  Technology  57  (11):  1743–1748. 
doi:

10.2166/wst.2008.287

.

Berardi, L., O. Giustolisi, Z. Kapelan, and D. A. Savic. 

2008

. “Development of 

Pipe  Deterioration  Models  for  Water  Distribution  Systems  Using  EPR.” 
Journal of Hydroinformatics 10 (2): 113–126. doi:

10.2166/hydro.2008.012

.

Breiman,  L. 

2001

.  “Random  Forests.”  Machine  Learning  45  (1):  5–32. 

doi:

10.1201/9780367816377-11

.

Butler,  D.,  R.  May,  and  J.  Ackers. 

1996

.  “Sediment  Transport  in  Sewers 

Part  1:  Background.”  Proceedings  of  the  Institution  of  Civil  Engineers  - 
Water  Maritime  and  Energy  
118  (2):  103–112.  doi:

10.1680/ 

iwtme.1996.28431

.

Caradot, N., H. Sonnenberg, I. Kropp, A. Ringe, S. Denhez, A. Hartmann, and 

P.  Rouault. 

2017

.  “The  Relevance  of  Sewer  Deterioration  Modelling  to 

Support  Asset  Management  Strategies.”  Urban  Water  Journal  14  (10): 
1007–1015. doi:

10.1080/1573062X.2017.1325497

.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

9

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/60159c9e8532762060aed094aadf6e33/index-html.html
background image

Daher, S., T. Zayed, M. Elmasry, and A. Hawari. 

2018

. “Determining Relative 

Weights  of  Sewer  Pipelines’  Components  and  Defects.”  Journal  of 
Pipeline  Systems  Engineering  and  Practice  
9  (1):  1–11.  doi:

10.1061/ 

(ASCE)PS.1949-1204.0000290

.

Ebtehaj, I., and H. Bonakdari. 

2016

. “Bed Load Sediment Transport in Sewers 

at  Limit  of  Deposition.”  Scientia  Iranica  23  (3):  907–917.  doi:

10.24200/ 

sci.2016.2169

.

El-Zaemey, Abdel. 

1991

. “Sediment Transport over Deposited Beds in Sewers.” 

PhD Diss., University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Elmasry,  M.,  A.  Hawari,  and  T.  Zayed. 

2017

.  “Defect  Based  Deterioration 

Model  for  Sewer  Pipelines  Using  Bayesian  Belief  Networks.”  Canadian 
Journal of Civil Engineering 
44 (9): 675–690. doi:

10.1139/cjce-2016-0592

.

Elmasry,  M.,  T.  Zayed,  and  A.  Hawari. 

2018

.  “Defect-Based  ArcGIS  Tool  for 

Prioritizing  Inspection  of  Sewer  Pipelines.”  Journal  of  Pipeline  Systems 
Engineering  and  Practice  
9  (4):  1–13.  doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)PS.1949- 

1204.0000342

.

Garrido-Merchán,  E.,  and  D.  Hernández-Lobato. 

2020

.  “Dealing  with 

Categorical and Integer-Valued Variables in Bayesian Optimization with 
Gaussian  Processes.”  Neurocomputing  380:  20–35.  doi:

10.1016/j. 

neucom.2019.11.004

.

Ghavami, S., Z. Borzooei, and J. Maleki. 

2020

. “An Effective Approach for Assessing 

Risk  of  Failure  in  Urban  Sewer  Pipelines  Using  a  Combination  of  GIS  and 
AHP-DEA.”  Process  Safety  and  Environmental  Protection  133.  Institution  of 
Chemical Engineers 
133: 275–285. doi:

10.1016/j.psep.2019.10.036

.

Guyon,  I.,  J.  Weston,  S.  Barnhill,  and  V.  Vapnik. 

2002

.  “Gene  Selection  for 

Cancer Classification Using Support Vector Machines.” Machine Learning 
46 (1/3): 62–72. doi:

10.1007/978-3-540-88192-6-8

.

Hahn,  M.,  R.  Palmer,  M.  Merrill,  and  A.  Lukas. 

2002

.  “Expert  System  for 

Prioritizing the Inspection of Sewers: Knowledge Base Formulation and 
Evaluation.”  Journal  of  Water  Resources  Planning  and  Management 
128 (2): 121–129. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9496(2002)128:2(121)

.

Harvey,  R.,  and  E.  McBean. 

2014

.  “Predicting  the  Structural  Condition  of 

Individual Sanitary Sewer Pipes with Random Forests.” Canadian Journal 
of Civil Engineering 
41 (4): 294–303. doi:

10.1139/cjce-2013-0431

.

Hawari, A., F. Alkadour, M. Elmasry, and T. Zayed. 

2017

. “Simulation-Based 

Condition  Assessment  Model  for  Sewer  Pipelines.”  Journal  of 
Performance  of  Constructed  Facilities  
31  (1):  4016066.  doi:

10.1061/ 

(ASCE)CF.1943-5509.0000914

.

Head,  Tim,  Gilles  Louppe  MechCoder,  Iaroslav  Shcherbatyi,  fcharras, 

Zé  Vinícius,  cmmalone,  et  al. 

2018

.  Scikit-Optimize/Scikit-Optimize: 

V0.5.2. March. doi:

10.5281/ZENODO.1207017

.

James,  G.,  D.  Witten,  T.  Hastie,  and  R.  Tibshirani. 

2013

.  “An  Introduction  to 

Statistical Learning.” In Springer Texts in Statistics. New York, USA: Springer, 
pp. 327– 366.

May,  R. 

1993

.  “Sediment  Transport  in  Pipes  and  Sewers  with  Deposited 

Beds.” Report SR 320. Oxfordshire, UK: HR Wallingford.

May,  R.,  P.  Brown,  G.  Hare,  and  K.  Jones. 

1989

.  “Self-Cleansing  Conditions  for 

Sewers Carrying Sediment.” Report SR 221. Oxfordshire, UK: HR Wallingford.

Mayerle,  R. 

1988

.  “Sediment  Transport  in  Rigid  Boundary  Channels.”  PhD 

Diss., University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Montes,  C,  L  Berardi,  Z  Kapelan,  and  J  Saldarriaga. 

2020a

.  “Predicting 

Bedload  Sediment  Transport  of  Non-Cohesive  Material  in  Sewer  Pipes 
Using  Evolutionary  Polynomial  Regression–Multi-Objective  Genetic 
Algorithm  Strategy.”  Urban  Water  Journal  17  (2):  154–162.  doi:

10.1080/ 

1573062X.2020.1748210

.

Montes,  C.,  Z.  Kapelan,  and  J.  Saldarriaga. 

2019

.  “Impact  of  Self-Cleansing 

Criteria  Choice  on  the  Optimal  Design  of  Sewer  Networks  in  South 
America.” Water (Switzerland)  11 (6). doi:

10.3390/w11061148

.

Montes, C., Z. Kapelan, and J. Saldarriaga. 

2021

. “Predicting Non-Deposition 

Sediment  Transport  in  Sewer  Pipes  Using  Random  Forest.”  Water 
Research  
189: 116639. Elsevier Ltd. doi:

10.1016/j.watres.2020.116639

.

Montes,  C.,  S.  Vanegas,  Z.  Kapelan,  L.  Berardi,  and  J.  Saldarriaga. 

2020b

.  “Non-Deposition  Self-Cleansing  Models  for  Large  Sewer 

Pipes.”  Water  Science  and  Technology  81  (3):  606–621.  doi:

10.2166/ 

wst.2020.154

.

Pedregosa, F., G. Varoquaux, L. Buitinck, G. Louppe, O. Grisel, and A. Mueller. 

2015

.  “Scikit-Learn.”  GetMobile:  Mobile  Computing  and  Communications 

19 (1): 29–33. doi:

10.1145/2786984.2786995

.

Perrusquia, G. 

1991

. “Bedload Transport in Storm Sewers. Stream Traction in 

Pipe  Channels.”  PhD  Diss.,  Chalmers  University  of  Technology, 
Gothenburg, Sweden.

Robinson,  M.,  and  W.  Graf. 

1972

.  “Critical  Deposit  Velocities  for 

Low-Concentration  Sand-Water  Mixtures.”  ASCE  National  Water 
Resources Engineering Meeting. January 24 – 28, Atlanta, Georgia.

Rodríguez,  J.,  N.  McIntyre,  M.  Díaz-Granados,  and  Č.  Maksimović. 

2012

“A  Database  and  Model  to  Support  Proactive  Management  of 
Sediment-Related  Sewer  Blockages.”  Water  Research  46  (15): 
4571–4586. doi:

10.1016/j.watres.2012.06.037

.

Safari, M., M. Mohammadi, and A. Ab Ghani. 

2018

. “Experimental Studies of 

Self-Cleansing  Drainage  System  Design:  A  Review.”  Journal  of  Pipeline 
Systems  Engineering  and  Practice  
9  (4):  4018017.  doi:

10.1061/(ASCE) 

PS.1949-1204.0000335

.

Tran,  H.  D. 

2007

.  Investigation  of  Deterioration  Models  for  Stormwater  Pipe 

Systems. Melbourne, Australia: Victoria University.

Tran,  H.  D.,  A.  W.M.  Ng,  and  B.  J.C.  Perera. 

2007

.  “Neural  Networks 

Deterioration Models for Serviceability Condition of Buried Stormwater 
Pipes.” Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 20 (8): 1144–1151. 
doi:

10.1016/j.engappai.2007.02.005

.

Tscheikner-Gratl,  F.,  N.  Caradot,  F.  Cherqui,  J.  Leitão,  M.  Ahmadi, 

J. Langeveld, Y. Le Gat, et al. 

2019

. “Sewer Asset Management–State of 

the Art and Research Needs.” Urban Water Journal 16 (9): 662–675. Taylor 
& Francis. doi:

10.1080/1573062X.2020.1713382

.

Vongvisessomjai,  N.,  T.  Tingsanchali,  and  M.  Babel. 

2010

.  “Non-Deposition 

Design Criteria for Sewers with Part-Full Flow.” Urban Water Journal 7 (1): 
61–77. doi:

10.1080/15730620903242824

.

Wang,  Z.,  F.  Hutter,  M.  Zoghi,  D.  Matheson,  and  N.  De  Freitas. 

2016

“Bayesian  Optimization  in  a  Billion  Dimensions  via  Random 
Embeddings.”  Journal  of  Artificial  Intelligence  Research  55:  361–367. 
doi:

10.1613/jair.4806

.

Yin,  X.,  Y.  Chen,  A.  Bouferguene,  H.  Zaman,  M.  Al-Hussein,  and  L.  Kurach. 

2020

.  “A  Deep  Learning-Based  Framework  for  an  Automated  Defect 

Detection  System  for  Sewer  Pipes.”  Automation  in  Construction 
109 (June 2019): 102967. Elsevier. doi:

10.1016/j.autcon.2019.102967

.

Zhou,  Q.,  H  Zhou,  Q.  Zhou,  F.  Yang,  and  L.  Luo. 

2008

.  “Structure  Damage 

Detection  Based  on  Random  Forest  Recursive  Feature  Elimination.” 
Machine 

Learning 

46  (1):  389–422.  Elsevier.  doi:

10.1016/j. 

ymssp.2013.12.013

.

Zhu, X., C. Vondrick, C. Fowlkes, and D. Ramanan. 

2016

. “Do We Need More 

Training  Data?”  International  Journal  of  Computer  Vision  119 (1):  76–92. 
doi:

10.1007/s11263-015-0812-2

.

10

S. VANEGAS ET AL.

¿Quiere saber más? Contáctenos

Declaro haber leído y aceptado la Política de Privacidad