Turbulent flow in PVC pipes in water distribution systems.

Water distribution systems (WDSs) are one of the most important urban infrastructure assets of the society. They are essential for human life in cities and directly

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at

https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=nurw20

Urban Water Journal

ISSN: (Print) (Online) Journal homepage: https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/nurw20

Turbulent flow in PVC pipes in water distribution

systems

Juan Carvajal, Willy Zambrano, Nicolás Gómez & Juan Saldarriaga

To cite this article:

 Juan Carvajal, Willy Zambrano, Nicolás Gómez & Juan Saldarriaga (2020)

Turbulent flow in PVC pipes in water distribution systems, Urban Water Journal, 17:6, 503-511,

DOI: 10.1080/1573062X.2020.1786137
To link to this article:  https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2020.1786137

Published online: 01 Jul 2020.

Submit your article to this journal 

Article views: 219

View related articles 

View Crossmark data

Citing articles: 1 View citing articles 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Turbulent flow in PVC pipes in water distribution systems

Juan Carvajal, Willy Zambrano, Nicolás Gómez and Juan Saldarriaga

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia

ABSTRACT

Since the incorporation of PVC as pipe material in the second half of 20

th 

century, its use in the design, 

rehabilitation  and  expansion  of  Water  Distribution  Networks  (WDS)  has  been  widely  assimilated. 
However,  materials  with  higher  roughness  were  more  commonly  used  and  with  these  materials  were 
carried  out  the  studies  on  which  are  based  the  most  used  design  equations  (Colebrook-White,  Darcy- 
Weisbach and Hazen-Williams). In this work, the applicability of these equations is tested using PVC as the 
material  to  verify  their  precision.  Measurements  of  pressure  loss  in  different  assemblies  for  extents  of 
Reynolds numbers ranging from 3x10

to 5x10

and relative roughness between 6x10

-4 

and 2x10

-3 

were 

performed. For small diameters, Blasius and Prandtl–von Kármán equations can be used to calculate the 
friction factor. On the other hand, for larger diameters, the Colebrook-White equation correctly describes 
the relationship between the friction factor and the Reynolds number.

ARTICLE HISTORY 

Received 25 July 2019  
Accepted 17 June 2020 

KEYWORDS 

Head losses in PVC pipes; 
steady flow in pressure 
conduits; friction factor; 
turbulent flow; flow 
resistance

Introduction

Water distribution systems (WDSs) are one of the most impor-
tant urban infrastructure assets of the society. They are essen-
tial  for  human  life  in  cities  and  directly  affect  public  health. 
Therefore,  it  is  vital  to  understand  the  hydraulic  behavior  of 
WDSs  to  properly  design  and  operate  them.  This  work  is  rele-
vant because it addresses to two basic inquiries: (1) the effect of 
modern  materials  (PVC)  in  pipes  and  in  the  design  of  civil 
infrastructure  and  (2)  if  the  equations  used  for  calculating  the 
flow characteristics in pipes are adequate or sufficiently precise. 
Testing  precision  of  friction  head  loss  equations  is  essential 
because  many  researches  focus  on  new  methodologies  for 
more precise designs and do not question if the equations for 
the design problem are sufficiently precise.

The rational empirical study of this work is relevant because 

the  equations  used  for  the  design  of  civil  engineering  infra-
structure  date  back  to  the  19th  and  early  20th  century  and 
plastic pipes began to be tested, approved and used globally, in 
the  mid  1960s.  Therefore,  when  the  equations  were  estab-
lished,  no  tests  were  performed  in  this  material  and  it  is  not 
clear if they are precise and should be used for the designs. The 
misuses of these equations can translate to capacity problems 
in  urban  drainage  systems  and  distribution  of  drinking  water, 
which  has  serious  implications.  As  mentioned,  in  a WDS  there 
can be social, economic and health implications regarding the 
errors  in  the  design  of  these  systems.  It  is  likely  that,  for  the 
design  horizon  contemplated,  the  systems  do  not  fulfill  their 
function due to blunders in the design calculations.

To have an accurate estimation of the flow resistance within 

the  system  it  is  necessary  to  study  the  equations  used  for 
calculating  the  flow  characteristics  in  pipes.  The  most  com-
monly  used  equations  for  pipe  design  are  Colebrook-White, 
Darcy-Weisbach  and  Hazen-Williams.  Although  the  use  of  the 
Hazen-Williams  equation is  preferred  for  its  ease of  operation, 

since it is explicit for velocity, one must be very careful because 
it  is  often  overlooked  that  this  equation  has  limits  of  applic-
ability (Diskin 

1960

). In this research, the equations mentioned 

before are used to calculate the friction factor  f

ð Þ

in a series of 

laboratory tests to verify their validity.

Darcy-Weisbach 

Equation  (1) 

is  the  most  general  equation 

for determining friction head losses, and thus, it does not have 
any limits in its applicability. 

h

f

¼

f

l

d

v

2

2g

(1) 

where is the acceleration of gravity, is the internal diameter 
of  the  pipe,  l  is  the  length  of  the  pipe,  v  is  the  velocity  of  the 
flow through the pipe and corresponds to the friction factor.

Colebrook  and  White  (

1939

),  on  a  semi-empirical  basis, 

found a mathematical relationship to describe the behavior of 
the friction factor in the turbulent flow zone: 

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

k

s

3:7d

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(2) 

where  f  corresponds  to  the  friction  factor,  Re  is  the  Reynolds 
number, is the internal diameter of the pipe and  k

S

=

d

ð

Þ

is the 

pipe relative roughness. It is important to denote that f ; Re and 
k

s

=

are all dimensionless parameters. For smooth pipes, if k

s

=

= 0, 

Equation (2) 

can be rewritten into the equation proposed 

by  Prandtl-von  Kármán.  This  also  applies  for  rough  pipes  of 
uniform  roughness,  when  the  value  of  1/Re  tends  to  0 
(Finnemore and Franzini 

2002

; Quintela 

2011

).

The Hazen-Williams 

Equation (3) 

is shown below: 

¼ 0:849C

HW

R

0:63

S

0:54

(3) 

where is the velocity, is the hydraulic radius, is the energy 
loss per length and C

HW 

is the Hazen-Williams coefficient. Some 

authors  have  set  limits  of  applicability  for  this  equation: 

CONTACT 

Juan Saldarriaga 

jsaldarr@uniandes.edu.co

URBAN WATER JOURNAL                                  
2020, VOL. 17, NO. 6, 503–511 
https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2020.1786137

© 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

Finnemore  and  Franzini  (

2002

)  and  Houghtalen,  Akan,  and 

Hwang (

2010

) suggest that the equation applies to pipes with 

diameters greater than 5 cm and velocities lower than 3 m/s.

Based  on  contemporary  standards  for  WDSs  such  as:  U.S. 

American  Water  Works  Association  (AWWA 

2002

),  Canadian 

Design  Guidelines  for  First  Nation  Water  Works  (Indian  and 
Northern  Affairs  Canada 

2006

),  Australian  Drinking  Water 

Guidelines  (Natural  Resource  Management  Ministerial  Council 

2011

)  and  Colombian  Technical  Regulation  of  the  Drinking 

Water  and  Basic  Sanitation  Sector  (Ministerio  de  Vivienda, 
Ciudad y Territorio 

2011

), the investigation focuses in the area 

of the Moody diagram in which real designs are contemplated. 
In addition, the scope of the research was reduced to PVC pipes 
with commercial diameters between 75 mm to 250 mm, which 
represent the composition of secondary water distribution net-
works  in  a  community  (Ministerio  de  Vivienda,  Ciudad 
y Territorio 

2011

).

Previous studies

The  concern  about  the  difference  between  modern  materials 
against  those  used  to  study  the  equations  that  engineers  rely 
on to make their designs is not so recent. For smooth pipes, the 
experimental  determination  of  roughness  k

is  difficult  and  is 

usually  done  by  statistical  analysis.  Diogo  and  Vilela  (

2014

), 

citing  Lencastre  (

1996

)  and  Novais-Barbosa  (

1986

),  observe 

that  values  of  the  order  of  0.002  mm  to  0.004  mm  or  even 
larger  are  often  reported  and  commonly  used  in  engineering 
practice for polyethylene and PVC pipes, and also highlight that 
aspects  regarding  the  manufacturing  processes  or  the  age  of 
the  materials  are  not  usually  considered  in  the  roughness 
selection.

Numerous  studies  have  reported  that  the  friction  factors 

observed and the corresponding head losses in the flow carried 
by  plastic  pipes  are  usually  lower  than  those  obtained  when 
considering  the  Colebrook-White  equation  without  absolute 
roughness.  A  succinct  and  suitable  review  is  presented  in 
Diogo and Vilela (

2014

) in which it is presented a succinct and 

suitable  review.  Levin  (

1972

)  presented  this  for  very  smooth 

plastic  pipes  of  20  meters  long,  with  an  internal  diameter  of 
approximately 210 mm. According to (von Bernuth and Wilson 

1989

), Norum (

1984

) and Urbina (

1976

) tested  small polyethy-

lene  pipes  with  internal  diameters  between  8.9  mm  and 
21  mm,  as  well  as  Paraqueima  (

1977

),  who  studied  polyethy-

lene  pipes  with  internal  diameters  of  17.6  mm  and  15.5  mm, 
respectively. With respect to high Re numbers, Bagarello et al. 
(

1995

)  carried  out  tests  on  small  low-density  polyethylene 

pipes  of  100  meters  in  length  and  commercial  diameters  of 
16  mm,  20  mm  and  25  mm.  Cardoso,  Frizzone,  and  Rezende 

(

2008

)  tested  low-density  polyethylene  pipes  with  a  length  of 

15  meters  and  small  internal  diameters  of  12.9  mm,  16.1  mm, 
17.4 mm and 19.7 mm.

More recently, Diogo and Vilela (

2014

) conducted a research 

in  the  Laboratory  of  Hydraulics,  Water  Resources  and 
Environment  of  Coimbra  University,  Portugal,  using  three 
assemblies  with  four  types  of  plastic  pipes  of  different  dia-
meters:  (1)  two  old  PVC  pipes  with  internal  diameters  of 
17.35  mm  and  21.75  mm;  (2)  a  high-density  polyethylene 
(HDPE)  pipe  with  an  internal  diameter  of  53.6  mm;  (3)  a  low- 
density  polyethylene  (LDPE)  pipe  with  an  internal  diameter  of 
94.5 mm; and (4) crystal PVC pipe with an internal diameter of 
35  mm.  The  results  of  the  tests  showed  a  trend  towards  the 
Colebrook-White curve that relates the friction  factor with the 
Reynolds  number.  Therefore,  they  confirmed  the  Colebrook- 
White equation as an effective tool for determining continuous 
head losses for water flowing through pressure plastic pipes in 
turbulent regimes. In addition, for Re up to 1 × 10

and a little 

less  than  1x10

6

,  the  empirical  equations  for  smooth  pipes  of 

Blasius  and  Scimemi  showed  an  appropriate  behavior.  This 
article  presents  an  experimental  work  that  is  based  on  the 
research  work  and  analysis  proposed  in  Diogo  and  Vilela 
(

2014

).  It  was  performed  for  PVC  pipes  of  relatively  large  dia-

meters, such as those that can be normally found in the current 
public Water Distribution Networks, and develops, expands and 
confirms the previous results obtained by those authors.

Analysis and empirical methods

An  inventory  of  some  secondary  distribution  networks  in 
Colombian cities was made to confirm the scope of the inves-
tigation. Results obtained showed that pipe diameter distribu-
tion  for  different  secondary  networks  is  analogous  and 
therefore applicable.

This  inventory  includes  all  the  materials  currently  used  in 

WDS  in  Colombia  (ductile  iron,  asbestos  cement,  PVC,  PVC-U, 
polyethylene and concrete). The showed diameters in the table 
correspond  to  a  commercial  denomination,  they  are  not  the 
real internal or external diameters of the pipes.

Table  1 

shows  similar  distributions  of  pipe  diameters  for 

secondary  networks  in  different  cities,  all  with  a  tendency  to 
small  diameters  up  to  150  mm.  Additionally,  diameters  of  50 
millimeters exist although the normative does not recommend 
them (previous versions of the normative allowed them). Other 
secondary networks from different cities also showed alike pipe 
distributions.

The  Colombian Technical Regulation of  the Drinking Water 

and Basic Sanitation Sector (RAS 

2001

) also establishes recom-

mendations  for  the  different  materials  that  used  in  a  WDS,  as 

Table 1. 

Resume inventory of some secondary distribution networks in Colombian cities. (The represented diameters are commercial and from several materials).

Barrancabermeja

Bogota 

(Sector 13)

Bucaramanga (Sector Estadio)

Bogota 

(Sector 7)

Santa Marta 

(Sector San Jorge)

Diameter (mm)

# of pipes

% of total

# of pipes

% of total

# of pipes

% of total

# of pipes

% of total

# of pipes

% of total

50

837

11%

154

2%

958

14%

24

1%

820

46%

75

4571

61%

2993

41%

4444

64%

1099

29%

536

30%

100

958

13%

1858

25%

828

12%

1172

31%

239

13%

150

482

6%

1539

21%

481

7%

939

25%

79

4%

200

338

5%

528

7%

195

3%

295

8%

64

4%

300

271

4%

317

4%

57

1%

250

7%

34

2%

504

J. CARVAJAL ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

well as the range of velocities to guarantee. For networks using 
PVC,  minimum  velocity:  0.50  m/s  and  maximum  velocity: 
6.00  m/s.  Likewise,  AWWA  (

2002

)  establishes  the  following 

range  for  the  velocities  in  PVC:  minimum  velocity:  0.15  m/s 
and maximum velocity: 1.52 m/s.

Using 

Equation (4) 

and assuming a temperature of 20°C (ν 

1.003 × 10

−6 

m

2

/s), is possible to calculate the range of Re that is 

permitted in this type of WDS for diameters of 75, 100, 150, 200 
and 250 mm. Similarly, the theoretical relative roughness (k

s

=

d

can be calculated for each diameter knowing that the absolute 
roughness (k

s

) of the PVC found in literature is 0.0015 mm. The 

results are shown in 

Table 2

Re ¼

vd

ν

(4) 

Larger  diameters  were  not  evaluated  due  to  their  meager 

quantity  in  percentage  founded  in  secondary  networks.  In 
addition, for larger diameters PVC is not a competitive material. 
Pipes with larger diameters are usually made of concrete, GRP 
and ductile iron.

As a result, the area of the Moody diagram of interest when 

working  with  secondary  water  distribution  networks  is 
enclosed in 

Figure 1

.

Often,  this  is  the  expected  range  when  working  with  very 

smooth  plastic  pipes  considering  the  recommendations  of 
velocities for the design of distribution networks.

To  perform  an  analysis  of  the  data  obtained  at  the  time  of 

the different tests, it is important to delimit the transition zone 
in the Moody diagram. For the Hydraulically Smooth Turbulent 
Flow  (HSTF),  the  Blasius  equation  is  used  to  calculate  the  fric-
tion factor.  Blasius (

1912

) found that for Re numbers between 

5  ×  10

and  1x10

5

,  the  friction  factor  is  calculated  with 

Equation (5)

¼

0:316
Re

0:25

(5) 

On the other hand, Prandtl (

1925

) found that, for the calculation 

of  the  friction  factor  for  both  smooth  and  rough  turbulent  flow, 

Equations (6) 

and (

7

) could be used, respectively. 

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(6) 

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

k

s

3:7d

(7) 

According to Colebrook and White (

1939

), a flow may be clas-

sified as HSTF (Hydraulically Smooth Turbulent Flow) when the 
pipe  roughness  size  is  equal  to  or  less  than  30.5%  of  the 
thickness  of  the  viscous  laminar  sublayer  (δ

0

).  Then,  by  repla-

cing  the  pipe  roughness  with  0.305δ

0

in  the  Colebrook-White 

equation, 

Equation (8) 

is obtained. 

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

5:21

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(8) 

Table  2. 

Reynolds  number  range  and  relative  roughness,  with  ks  equal  to 

0.0015 mm, range in secondary WDS.

d (mm)

AWWA

RAS

k

s

/d(-)

Re

max 

(-)

Re

min 

(-)

Re

max 

(-)

Re

min 

(-)

75

1:14 � 10

5

1.12 � 10

4

4.49 � 10

5

3.74 � 10

4

0.000020

100

1:52 � 10

5

1.50 � 10

4

5.98 � 10

5

4.99 � 10

4

0.000015

150

2.27 � 10

5

2.24 � 10

4

8.97 � 10

5

7.48 � 10

4

0.000010

200

3.03 � 10

5

2:99 � 10

4

1.20 � 10

6

9.97 � 10

4

0.000008

250

3.79 � 10

5

3.74 � 10

4

1.50 � 10

6

1.25 � 10

5

0.000006

Figure 1. 

Area of Moody diagram in which secondary WDS designs are contemplated for PCV pipes.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

505

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

This  equation  establishes  the  limit  between  the  hydraulically 
smooth  turbulent  flow  and  the  transition  turbulent  flow  in 
those  cases  in  which  the  absolute  roughness  (k

s

)  is  not  an 

absolute  value  but  an  equivalent  value  that  represents  the 
random  variability  of  surface  roughness  in  a  normal  material. 
For  that  reason,  we  did  not  use 

Equation  7 

because  it  repre-

sents  those  cases  studied  by  Johann  Nikuradse,  which  used 
a  constant  artificial  roughness  created  by  fixing  sand  grains 
with  the  uniform  diameter  with  the  size  is  larger  than  the 
laminar sublayer thickness (Streeter, Wylie, and Bedford 

1998

).

Therefore, the equations expressing the hydraulically smoot 

turbulent flow zone in the Moody diagram are 

Equations (5)

, (

6

and (

8

). 

Equations (5) 

and (

6

) are for totally smooth pipes and 

they represent a theoretical minimum limit for f; they appear as 
the  lower  limit  on  Moody  Diagram.  On  the  other  hand, 

Equation (8) 

represents the upper limit of hydraulically smooth 

turbulent flow as shown in all figures.

The deductive process of 

Equation 8 

is shown below: 

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

0:305δ

0

3:7d

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(9) 

δ

0

¼

11:6ν

v

(10) 

(1) Roughness (k

s

) is replaced in 

Equation (2) 

with 30.5% of 

the viscous laminar sublayer (δ ‘)

where ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and v

, is the shear 

rate velocity that is defined as follows in 

Equation (11)

v

¼

ffiffiffiffi

τ

0

ρ

r

(11) 

where τ

is the shear stress and ρ the density of the fluid.

(1) In 

Equation 9

, the thickness of the viscous laminar sub-

layer is replaced by 

Equation (10) 

and 

Equation (11)

.

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

0:305

3:7d

11:6ν

v

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

0:305

3:7d

11:6ν

ffiffiffi

τ

0

ρ

q

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

0

B

@

1

C

A

(12) 

¼

8τ

0

ρv

2

(13) 

(1) The  relationship  between  the  friction  factor  and  the 

shear stress is considered as shown in 

Equation (13)

.

where v  is the mean velocity of the flow.

(1) In 

Equation  (12)

,  the  shear  stress  is  replaced  by  the 

friction  factor,  density  and  average  flow  velocity 
(

Equation (13)

)

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

0:305

3:7d

11:6ν

ffiffiffiffiffi

f ρv2

8

ρ

r

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

0

B

B

@

1

C

C

A

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

2:7ν

ffiffi

f

p

vd

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(14) 

(1) Finally,  in 

Equation  (14) 

the  velocity  is  replaced  as 

a function of the Reynolds number.

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

2:7ν

ffiffi

f

p

νRe

d

d

þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

 

!

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

2:7

Re

ffiffi

f

p þ

2:51

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(15) 

On  the  other  hand,  the  upper  limit  of  the  transition  zone  is 
defined  by  the  HRTF  (Hydraulically  Rough  Turbulent  Flow). 
According to  Colebrook  and White  (

1939

), this  happens when 

k

is equal to 6:1δ

0

Equation (7) 

and 

Equation (16) 

express the 

upper limit of the transition zone. 

1

ffiffi

f

p ¼

2log

10

56:6

Re

ffiffi

f

p

(16) 

Equation  (16) 

is  obtained  with  a  deductive  similar  process  to 

the one of 

Equation (8) 

consideringk

s

¼

6:1δ

0

.

To  understand  the  effect  that  the  new  boundaries  of  the 

transition  zone  can  present  in  the  Moody  diagram,  the  lower 
and upper limits of the Colebrook-White equation for the tran-
sition  zone  are  plotted  based  on 

Equations  (8) 

and  (

16

).  In 

addition,  the  limits  of  this  zone  are  also  defined  considering 
the Blasius 

Equation (5) 

and Prandtl-von Kármán 

Equations (6) 

and  (

7

).  The  delimitation  of  the  transition  zone  is  shown  in 

Figure  2

,  where  the  x-axis  is  on  a  logarithmic  scale,  the  left 

y-axis  is  on  a  linear  scale,  and  the  right  y-axis  is  again  on 
a logarithmic scale.

When  comparing  the  upper  limit  of  the  transition  zone 

obtained from the Colebrook-White equation with the Prandtl- 
von  Kármán  equation, it  is  observed  that  both  coincide  for  all 
the range of Re. This occurs because of the second term of the 
parenthesis  of  the  Colebrook-White  equation  is  insignificant 
compared  to  the  order  of  magnitude  of  the  first  term,  as  can 
be seen in the deductive process of 

Equation (16)

. For the lower 

limit, the boundary described by the Blasius equation concurs 
with what is defined by the Prandtl-von Kármán equation in the 
limits of applicability that was deduced. On the other hand, in 
contrast  to  the  upper  limit,  the  lower  bound  defined  by  the 
Colebrook-White 

Equation (8) 

differs.

Furthermore, in addition to the empirical analysis made for 

the  equations  considering  pipe  roughness,  other  widely  used 
equation  to  analyze  here  is  the  Hazen–Williams  equation.  The 
reason  to  do  so  is  that  this  equation  is  not  appropriate  for 
plastic pipes but, in fact, is commonly and wrongly used. Here 
the  value  of  the  Hazen-Williams  coefficient  (C

HW

)  must  be 

determined.  A  relationship  between  the  C

HW 

and  f  is  found 

using  both  the  Colebrook-White  equation  and  the  Hazen- 
Williams equation was given by Liou (

1998

); this relation is: 

506

J. CARVAJAL ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

C

HW

¼

14:09

f

0:54

d

0:009

ν

0:081

Re

0:081

(17) 

Experiments performed

Seven  laboratory  tests  were  performed  using  two  different 
experimental  installations  located  in  Bogotá,  Colombia.  Four 
tests at the Hydraulic Laboratory of Universidad de Los Andes, 
and three tests at PAVCO S.A. facilities (a subsidiary enterprise 
of  Mexichem,  a  Mexican  producer  of  plastic  pipes  and  one  of 
the largest chemicals and petrochemical companies founded in 
1953;  standard:  ASTM  D2241)  and  are  schematically  repre-
sented in 

Figure 3

.

The  experimental  setup  in  the  Hydraulic  Laboratory  of 

Universidad  de  los  Andes  is  schematically  presented  in 

Figure 

3(a

).  The  experimental  installations  consist  of  an  upper  tank 

(distribution  tank  to  all  laboratory  location),  which  serves  to 
ensure the stability of the pressure head, a lower tank (storage 
tank in laboratory underground) and a closed circuit. Water for 
the  lower  tank  is  pumped  to  the  upper  tank  (14  m  above), 

where a constant head is assured to feed the arrangement. To 
accomplish  this,  the  pumped  discharged  to  the  upper  tank 
must be larger than the discharged send to the test pipe. The 
excess discharge is transported back to the lower tank through 
an  outflow  pipe.  The  test  pipe  has  15  mounts  that  provide 
stability and avoid vibrations. The supports are adapted to the 
conditions of the laboratory and placed so that the pipe is kept 
horizontal. For the differential pressure measurement, there are 
two  KOBOLD  sensors  (MAN-SD  reference)  with  a  measuring 
range  of  0–1  bar  and  an  accuracy  of  ±  0.5%.  A  portable  ultra-
sonic measurer (Ultraflux UF 801-P) is used for measuring velo-
cities. This equipment has a measuring range between 1 mm/s 
and  45  m/s,  for  external  diameters  between  10  mm  and  10 
meters, with an accuracy of ± 0.5%. In addition, a Dwyer digital 
thermometer  (WT-10  model)  measures  temperature  with 
a  range  between  −40°C  and  200°C  and  accuracy  of  ±0.1°C. 
Two  gate  valves  regulate  the  flow  that  goes  through  the  test 
pipe.

The experimental setup in PAVCO facilities, 

Figure 3(b

), con-

sists of a test PVC pipe in which the tests are carried out, a pipe 
that transports the water from the storage tank to an elevated 

Figure 2. 

Delimitation of the transition zone in the Moody diagram.

Figure 3. 

(a) Schema of experimental setup at Universidad de los Andes. (b) Schema of experimental setup at PAVCO S.A facilities.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

507

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

tank (PVC, internal diameter  203.2 mm), and  an overflow pipe 
(PVC, internal diameter 160.86 mm). There were three test pipes 
in  molecular  bi-oriented  PVC  as  shown  in 

Table  3

.  The  supply 

tank  creates  a  6  meters  head  at  the  entrance  of  the  test  pipe. 
This  tank  is  connected  to  a  second  pipe  that  reaches  another 
tank  that  fulfills  two  functions:  (1)  measures  the  flow  carried 
and (2) stores water in the system guaranteeing constant piezo-
metric  height  to  produce  permanent  steady  flow.  The  flow 
measurement  is  done  electronically,  using  a  sharp-crested 
weir,  and  the  storage  is  designed  so  that  the  system  is  fed 
continuously  by  a  pumping  system,  which  allows  to  maintain 
a constant redundant flow, avoiding water waste. Additionally, 
the system is properly instrumented with electronic measurers 
to  facilitate  pressure  and  flow  measurements,  guaranteeing 
accuracy  and  redundancy  in  them.  The  instrumentation  used 
consists  in  a  KOBOLD  differential  pressure  sensor  (PAD  refer-
ence) and a measurement range of 0–375 mbar with ± 0.075% 
accuracy,  a  flowmeter  at  the  outlet  of  the  test  pipe  with  an 
accuracy of ± 0.40%, and a thermometer with an accuracy of ± 
0.1°C.

A description of the seven tests performed is shown below:

The first test (PAVCO facilities) consisted of a main biaxial 
PVC pipe of 78 meters long, with an internal diameter of 
161.28 millimeters (without joints).

The second test (PAVCO facilities) differs from the first one 
as  the  no-junction  (NJ)  pipe  is  replaced  with  a  pipe  with 
the  same  diameter  but  with  13  joints  (WJ).  The  spacing 
between joints is 5.85 meters. The type of joint is spigot- 
bell  
and  is  used  to  study  the  influence  of  fittings  on  the 
hydraulic  flow.  The  instrumentation  is  maintained  the 
same as for the first model.

The  third  test,  carried  out  at  the  Hydraulic  Laboratory  of 
the  Universidad  de  los  Andes,  consists  in  a  biaxial  PVC 
pipe  of  12  meters  in  length,  without  joints  (NJ),  and  a  -
161.28 mm of real internal diameter. At the end is located 
a  gate  valve  to  regulate  the  flow  that  goes  through  the 
161.28 mm real diameter pipe. In addition, two grids, with 
161.28  mm  in  diameter  and  1  cm  thick,  were  used  to 
uniformize flow inside the main pipe and ensure uniform 
flow conditions.

For test 4 (Hydraulic Laboratory), a biaxial PVC pipe is used 
with  a  real  diameter  of  107.9  millimeters.  The  length  of 
this  experimental  installation  is  maintained  (12  meters), 
but  spigot-bell  joints  are  used  (WJ).  The  original  pipe  is 
removed and reductions are placed at the beginning and 
end  of  the  pipe.  The  valve  is  at  the  end  of  the  pipe,  and 
the drainage system is the same as mentioned for test 3.

In test 5 (Hydraulic Laboratory), a pipe of 107.9 millimeters 
of  the  real  diameter  without  joints  (NJ)  and  12  meters 
long  was  used.  Unlike  the  other  tests,  the  flow  control 
valve is located at the beginning of the pipe. At the end of 
the  assembly,  there  is  located  an  open  tank.  For  the 
determination of the flow, an electronic measuring device 
is used.

For  test  6  (Hydraulic  Laboratory),  a  bonding  PVC  pipe  of 
81.84 mm real diameter, with no joints (NJ), and 12 meters 
in length is used. The control valve is placed at the end of 
the  test  pipe.  For  this  model,  a  KOBOLD  sensor  (PAD 
reference) and a measurement range of 0–75 mbar, with 
accuracy, up to ±0.075%.

For the third PAVCO test (test 7), and last test performed, 
the PVC pipe has an internal diameter of 209.42 mm and is 
78  meters  long.  The  same  amount  and  distribution  of 
fittings  is  maintained  as  described  in  the  second  test 
(WJ),  as  well  of  the  instrumentation  used  in  the  first  two 
tests.

Table 3 

provides a summary of the laboratory tests previously 

described.

Results, analysis and discussion

For  each test, the  value  of the  friction  lossesh

is  measured  as 

the  difference  of  pressures  recorded  between  the  two  points 
where  the  piezometers  are.  In  the  assemblies  that  have  joints 
(spigot-bell), to find h

it is necessary to consider the contribu-

tion from minor losses h

m

. These minor losses were calculated 

using a loss coefficient of 0.01 (measured in other assemblies of 
the  Hydraulic  Laboratory)  per  each  one  of  the  joints  in  the 
assembly. The minor losses (h

m

) were computed and removed 

from the measured total losses (h

h

m

) in order to obtain the 

friction losses (h

f

) and then to calculate the friction factor for all 

the  cases.  It  is  important  to  say  that  in  all  the  tests  pipelines 
minor  losses  were  up  to  0.25%  of  friction  losses  in  the  worst 
scenario.  Knowing  the  geometry  of  the  pipe  and  the  flow 
velocity  that  is  related  to  the  flow  rate  recorded  in  each  test, 
the friction factor f  can be found for each test, as well as the Re 
number. With the relation between the friction factor f  and the 
Hazen-Williams coefficient C

HW

, it is calculated the value of this 

coefficient for each test. On the other hand, the k

and C

HW 

are 

calculated from a simple average for all the results performed in 
each pipe. A summary of the results is presented in 

Table 4

.

The  temperature  range  of  water  in  which  the  tests  were 

performed  is  very  stable,  no  temperature  exceeds  23°C  and 
no  one  is  below  16°C.  The  range  of  flow  rates  has  varied 

Table 3. 

Summary of the laboratory test characteristics.

Laboratory Test

External Diameter 

(mm)

Real Internal Diameter 

(mm)

Wall Thicknesses 

(mm)

Distance between piezometers 

(m)

Characteristics

PAVCO S.A (150 – NJ)

168.70

161.28

3.71

66.08

No joints

PAVCO S.A (150 – WJ)

168.70

161.28

3.71

71.24

13 joints

Hydraulic Laboratory (150 – NJ)

168.70

161.28

3.71

11.77

No joints

Hydraulic Laboratory (100 – 

WJ)

114.66

107.9

3.38

8.42

2 joints

Hydraulic Laboratory (100 – NJ)

114.66

107.9

3.38

9.51

No joints

Hydraulic Laboratory (75 – NJ)

88.82

81.84

3.49

9.11

No joints

PAVCO S.A (200 – WJ)

219.08

209.42

4.83

73.68

13 joints

508

J. CARVAJAL ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

considerably, and consequently, Re number as well. Test 6 has 
the smallest flow value registered, 4.3 liters per second and a Re 
number of 6.06 × 10

4

. Test 1 has the largest flow rate, reaching 

up  to  51  liters  per  second,  Re  number  of  3.7  ×  10

5

.  Even  with 

this  considerable  flow  ranges,  changes  in  temperature,  dia-
meter  and  type  of  experimental  setup,  all  the  data  obtained 
are  in  the  HSTF  regime.  Another  parameter  that  is  calculated 
with the data obtained is the mean Hazen-Williams coefficient 
and  the  mean  roughness  of  the  PVC.  The  mean  roughness 
presents a great variation when compared to the values regis-
tered in the literature for the PVC (0.0015 mm).

Through 

Figure  4(a

–e),  the  Moody  Diagram  is  shown  with 

the  graphical  results  of  the  data  obtained  for  all  the  tests 
performed.  The  graph  results  are  presented  form  smallest  to 
largest diameter.

In 

Figure 4(a

), it is shown that for the 81.84 mm real diameter 

pipe,  the  results  tend  to  the  limit  established  by  Prandtl  von 
Kármán for HSTF. For this test, the Re number does not exceed 
2  ×  10

(¼ 2.78  m/s). 

Figure  4(b

)  shows  that  for  Re  numbers 

between 6 × 10

and 1.2 × 10

(¼ 0.59 m/s – 5.45 m/s), the trend 

for  a  100  mm  commercial  diameter  PVC  pipe  (107.9  mm  real 

internal diameter) is similar with and without joints. Although it 
was tested Re numbers up to 5 × 10

for pipes without joints, this 

region of the Moody diagram cannot be compared since, for pipe 
with joints, this range is not covered. However, it is possible to see 
that for the entire test range, collected data trend is towards the 
boundary of Prandtl von Kármán.

From 

Figure  4(c

,d)  it  is  observed  that  for  pipes  of  150  mm  of 

commercial diameter (161.28 mm real internal diameter), the ten-
dency  is  towards  the  limit  established  by  the  Colebrook-White 
equation  for  HSTF.  This  trend  is  clearer  when  working  with  high 
Re numbers (greater than 1x10

5

¼ 0.7 m/s). 

Figure 4(e

) shows 

the  transition  that  occurs  when  working  with  very  low  and  very 
high Re numbers. Towards lower flows, the graph tends towards 
the  Prandtl  von  Kármán  Smooth  Turbulent  Flow  limit,  while  for 
higher Re number this change, and tends toward the Colebrook- 
White Smooth Turbulent Flow limit. For larger diameters, the trend 
is most evident toward the Colebrook-White limit.

Figure  5 

shows  that,  in  general,  for  smaller  diameters,  the 

friction factor tends  towards the Prandtl von  Kármán limit, while 
for  larger  diameters  (greater  than  161.28  mm  in  diameter)  the 
trend  tends  toward  the  Colebrook-White  limit,  for  the  whole 

Table 4. 

Summary of results for each test.

Test

T (°C)

Q (l/s)

h

(m)

Re (-)

f  (-)

k

(mm)

C

HW 

(-)

1

78 m 150 mm (NJ)

Minimum

16.3

8.24

0.0704

6.26E+04

0.0152

0.0353

146.4

Maximum

20.8

51.02

1.9999

3.70E+05

0.0209

2

78 m 150 mm (WJ)

Minimum

16.4

8.32

0.0677

6.33E+04

0.0148

0.0231

151.0

Maximum

20.2

49.99

2.0992

3.83E+05

0.0199

3

12 m 150 mm (NJ)

Minimum

16.8

9.20

0.0145

6.06E+04

0.0171

0.0334

146.7

Maximum

20.2

33.97

0.1794

2.18E+05

0.0198

4

12 m 100 mm (WJ)

Minimum

20.4

5.58

0.0292

6.05E+04

0.0167

0.0109

149.4

Maximum

22.1

11.35

0.1064

1.24E+05

0.0209

5

12 m 100 mm (NJ)

Minimum

19.9

5.41

0.0305

6.04E+04

0.0135

0.0109

151.1

Maximum

23.0

49.81

1.8012

5.59E+05

0.0210

6

12 m 75 mm (NJ)

Minimum

18.7

4.29

0.0789

6.06E+04

0.0161

0.0075

150.5

Maximum

21.2

14.60

0.7021

2.04E+05

0.0209

7

78 m 200 mm (WJ)

Minimum

16.5

5.11

0.0101

2.86E+04

0.016

0.0706

143.3

Maximum

18.5

45.81

0.5093

2.58E+05

0.0257

Figure 4. 

(a) Test 6 – results of 123 tests for PVC pipes with an internal diameter (dÞof 81.84 mm and 66.08 m long (no joints). (b) Test 4 & 5 – results of 145 tests of 

¼ 9.51 m (no joints) and 132 tests ¼ 8.42 m (with joints) for ¼ 107.9 mm. (c) Test 3 – results of 198 tests ¼ 161.28 mm and ¼ 11.77 m (no joints). (d) Test 1 & 
2 – results of 250 tests of ¼ 66.08 m (no joints) and 296 tests of ¼ 71.24 m (with joints) for ¼ 161.28 mm. (e) Test 7 – results of 186 tests ¼ 209.4 mm and 
¼ 73.68 m (with joints). (f) Moody Diagram with the limits established by the proposed equations of different authors.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

509

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

range of Re number in which the data were collected. In addition, it 
is  clear  that  for  low  Re  numbers,  there  is  no  clear  trend.  The 
dispersion in this zone may be due to the underestimation of the 
pressure  loss  read  by  the  sensors.  This  variation  in  the  pressure 
difference  may  also  lead  to  an  underestimation  of  the  friction 
factor and, hence, of relative roughness.

Conclusions

It  is  normal  to  question  the  materials  implemented  in  finding 
the design equations most used for the design of potable water 
distribution  networks.  More  modern  and  smoother  materials 
are  being  used  every  day,  with  the  incorporation  of  thermo-
plastic  materials  and  smoother  composite  materials.  In  this 
research,  the  existence  of  HSTF  in  PVC  pipes  that  are  in  the 
design  range  for  secondary  drinking  water  distribution  net-
works  is  verified  based  on  the  limits  established  by  the  pro-
posed equations of different authors.

For  a  Reynolds  number  range  between  5  ×  10

and  5x10

5

,  it 

can  be  concluded  that:  for  small  diameters,  the  Prandtl  von 
Kármán equation (

Equation 6

) has an adequate behavior because 

allows a good approximation when relating  the friction factor (f
with  the  Reynolds  number  (Re),  while  for  larger  diameters  this 
relationship  is  best  described  by  the  Colebrook-White  Equation. 
This conclusion is relevant because the Prandtl von Kármán HSTF 
equation  does  not  use  the  pipe  roughness  for  the  calculation  of 
the  friction factor;  hence,  it  could  be  irrelevant  the  estimation  of 
pipe absolute  roughness for  the  design. Regarding  the  presence 
of  joints,  it  is  important  to  say  that  they  were  not  a  factor  that 
greatly affected friction head loss in all tested PVC pipes.

For  the  discharges  range  used  in  this  research,  Hazen- 

Williams coefficients show a large variation of about ±12% for 
a mean value. This precision is even less for Reynolds numbers 

outside of those used in this research, this allows us to conclude 
that  Hazen-Williams  equation  should  not  be  used  in  plastic 
pipes.

Even though the materials used for this study are smoother 

than  the  ones  to  postulate  the  equations  that  are  currently 
used  for  the  estimation  of  the  friction  factor,  the  results  show 
that  traditional  equations  allow  a  good  approximation  to  cal-
culate  the  friction  factor.  This  can  be  seen  in  the  information 
shown, since all the experimental data is located between the 
Prandtl  von  Kármán  and  Colebrook-White  limits,  confirming 
that  the  last  one,  is  the  most  powerful  tool  for  determining 
head loses.

With  the  advancement  in  new  materials  and  more 

powerful  tools  for  data  collection,  it  is  essential  that  new 
tests  be  carried  out  to  corroborate  the  results  attained.  By 
obtaining  even  more  accurate  data,  it  will  be  possible  to 
carry  out  a  more  detailed  and  precise  analysis  of  the 
information,  thus  recreating  conditions  for  a  better  under-
standing  of  the  reality  that  occurs  in  potable  water  dis-
tribution  networks.  It  is  recommended  that  new  tests  be 
performed,  and  other  modern  materials  are  tested,  obtain-
ing  even  more  significant  results  capable  of  reaffirming 
that  the  equations  that  have  been  used  since  the 
1920s  for  the  design  of  WDNs  are  correct  and  precise.

Disclosure statement

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the author(s).

ORCID

Juan Saldarriaga 

http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1265-2949

Figure 5. 

All tests results.

510

J. CARVAJAL ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/3793a4fedf883f6494215d3d5ba8d060/index-html.html
background image

References

AWWA  (American  Water  Works  Association). 

2002

.  PVC  Pipe-Design  and 

Installation. 2nd ed. Denver.

Bagarello,  V.,  V.  Ferro,  G.  Provenzano,  and  D.  Pumo. 

1995

.  “Experimental 

Study on Flow-Resistance Law for Small-Diameter Plastic Pipes.” Journal 
of  Irrigation  and  Drainage  Engineering  
121  (5):  313–316.  doi:

10.1061/ 

(ASCE)0733-9437(1995)121:5(313)

.

Blasius,  H. 

1912

.  “Das  Aehnlichkeitsgesetz  bei  Reibungsvorgängen  in 

Flüssigkeiten.”  Mitteilungen  über  Forschungsarbeiten  auf  dem  Gebiete 
des Ingenieurwesens
, vol. 134. Berlin: VDI-Verlag. doi:

10.1007/978-3-662- 

02239-9

Cardoso, G., J. A. Frizzone, and R. Rezende. 

2008

. “Fator de Atrito Em Tubos 

de Polietileno de Pequenos Diámetros.” Acta Scientiarum – Agronomy 30 
(3): 299–305.

Colebrook,  C.  F.  and  C.  M.  White. 

1939

.  “Turbulent  Flow  in  Pipes,  with 

Particular  Reference  to  the  Transistion  Region  between  the  Smooth 
and  Rough  Pipe  Laws.”  Journal  of  the  Institution  of  Civil  Engineers  11 
(4): 133–56. doi:

10.1680/ijoti.1939.13150

.

Diogo,  A.  F.,  and  F.  A.  Vilela. 

2014

.  “Head  Losses  and  Friction  Factors  of 

Steady  Turbulent  Flows  in  Plastic  Pipes.”  Urban  Water  Journal  11  (5): 
414–425. doi:

10.1080/1573062X.2013.768682

.

Diskin,  M.  H. 

1960

.  “The  Limits  of  Applicability  of  the  Hazen-Williams 

Formula.” La Houille Blanche 6 (6): 720–726. doi:

10.1051/lhb/1960059

.

Finnemore,  E.  J.,  and  J.  B.  Franzini. 

2002

.  Fluid  Mechanics  with  Engineering 

Applications. 10th ed. Boston, Massachusetts: McGraw-Hill.

Houghtalen,  R.  J.,  A.  O.  Akan,  and  N.  H.  C.  Hwang. 

2010

.  Fundamentals  of 

Hydraulic Engineering  Systems. Englewood, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada. 

2006

Design Guidelines for First Nations 

Water  Works.  Gatineau,  Quebec. 

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/ 

1100100034922/1100100034924

Lencastre,  A. 

1996

.  Hidráulica  Geral.  Edição  Do  Autor.  Lisboa,  Portugal: 

Armando Lencastre.

Levin,  L. 

1972

.  “Étude  Hydraulique  de  Huit  Revêtements  Mintérieurs  de 

Conduites  Forcées.”  La  Houille  Blanche,  no.  4:  263–278.  doi:

10.1051/ 

lhb/1972020

.

Liou,  C.  P. 

1998

.  “Limitations  and  Proper  Use  of  the  Hazen-Williams 

Equation.”  Journal  of  Hydraulic  Engineering  124  (9):  951–954. 
doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1998)124:9(951)

.

Ministerio  de  Vivienda,  Ciudad  y  Territorio. 

2011

.  Reglamento  técnico  del 

Sector de Agua Potable y Saneamiento Básico - RAS: TÍTULO B. (2). Bogotá 
DC,  Colombia:  Viceministerio  de  Agua  y  Saneamiento  Basico.  ISBN: 
978–958–8491–51–6.

Natural  Resource  Management  Ministerial  Council. 

2011

.  Australian 

Drinking Water  Guidelines 6. Canberra. 

www.nhmrc.gov.au

Norum, E. M. 

1984

. “Determining Friction Loss in Polyethylene Pipe Used for 

Drip Irrigation Laterals.” Irrigation  Age 26: 17–18.

Novais-Barbosa, J. 

1986

Mecânica dos Fluidos e Hidráulica Geral. Vol. 2 vols. 

Porto, Portugal: Porto Editora. ISBN: 9789720060211.

Paraqueima,  J.  R. 

1977

.  “Study  of  Some  Frictional  Characteristics  of  Small 

Diameter  Tubing  for  Trickle  Irrigation  Laterals.”  Thesis  (MSc), 
Department  of  Agricultural  and  Irrigation  Engineering,  Utah  State 
University.

Prandtl, L. 

1925

. “Uber die Ausgebildete Turbulenz.” Zamm  5 (2): 136–139. 

doi:

10.1002/zamm.19250050212

.

Quintela, A. D. C. 

2011

Hidráulica. 10th ed. Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian. 

Lisboa, Portugal: Serviço de Educação e Bolsas.

RAS. 

2001

. “Reglamento técnico del Sector de Agua Potable y Saneamiento 

Básico  -  RAS:  TÍTULO  B.  (2)”.  Bogotá  DC,  Colombia:  Ministerio  de 
Vivienda,  Ciudad  y  Territorio.  Viceministerio  de  Agua  y  Saneamiento 
Basico. Retrieved from ISBN: 978-958-8491-51-6.

Saldarriaga,  J.  2019.  Hidráulica  de  Tuberías.  4th  ed.  Bogotá:  Alfaomega 

Colombiana. ISBN:978–958–778–624–8.

Streeter, V. L., B. E. Wylie, and K. W. Bedford. 

1998

Fluid Mechanics. 9th ed. 

New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 0–07–062537–9.

Urbina, J. L. 

1976

. “Head Loss Characteristics of Trickle Irrigation Hose with 

Emitters.”  Thesis  (MSc),  Department  of  Agricultural  and  Irrigation 
Engineering, Utah State University.

von Bernuth, R. D., and T. Wilson. 

1989

. “Friction Factors for Small Diameter 

Plastic  Pipes.”  Journal  of  Hydraulic  Engineering  115  (2):  183–192. 
doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1989)115:2(183)

.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

511

¿Quiere saber más? Contáctenos

Declaro haber leído y aceptado la Política de Privacidad