Sediment transport prediction in sewer pipes during flushing operation

Sediment deposition and accumulation are well-known issues in sewer systems modelling. The presence of permanent deposits of material at the bottom of sewer pipes

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at

https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=nurw20

Urban Water Journal

ISSN: (Print) (Online) Journal homepage: https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/nurw20

Sediment transport prediction in sewer pipes

during flushing operation

Carlos Montes, Hachly Ortiz, Sergio Vanegas, Zoran Kapelan, Luigi Berardi &

Juan Saldarriaga

To cite this article:

 Carlos Montes, Hachly Ortiz, Sergio Vanegas, Zoran Kapelan, Luigi Berardi

& Juan Saldarriaga (2022) Sediment transport prediction in sewer pipes during flushing operation,

Urban Water Journal, 19:1, 1-14, DOI: 10.1080/1573062X.2021.1948077
To link to this article:  https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2021.1948077

Published online: 16 Jul 2021.

Submit your article to this journal 

Article views: 218

View related articles 

View Crossmark data

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Sediment transport prediction in sewer pipes during flushing operation

Carlos Montes

a

, Hachly Ortiz

a

, Sergio Vanegas

a

, Zoran Kapelan

b

, Luigi Berardi

and Juan Saldarriaga

a

a

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia; 

b

Department of Water Management, Delft 

University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; 

c

Department of Engineering and Geology, Università Degli Studi “G. d’Annunzio” Chieti, Pescara, Italy

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a novel model for predicting the sediment transport rate during flushing operation in 
sewers. The model was developed using the Evolutionary Polynomial Regression Multi-Objective Genetic 
Algorithm (EPR-MOGA) methodology applied to new experimental data collected. Using the new model, 
a series of design charts were developed to predict the sediment transport rate and the required flushing 
operation time for several pipe diameters. Accurate results (i.e. sediment transport rates) were obtained 
when  applied  to  a  case  study  in  a  combined  sewer  pipe  in  Marseille,  as  reported  in  the  literature.  The 
novelty  of  the  model  is  the  inclusion  of  the  pipe  slope,  the  inflow  ‘dam  break’  hydrograph,  and  the 
sediment properties as explanatory parameters. The new model can be used to predict flushing efficiency 
and design new flushing cleaning schedules in sewer systems.

ARTICLE HISTORY 

Received 19 February 2021  
Accepted 21 June 2021 

KEYWORDS 

Flushing efficiency; sediment 
transport; sewer cleansing; 
sewer flushing

1. Introduction

Sediment  deposition  and  accumulation  are  well-known  issues 
in sewer systems modelling. The presence of permanent depos-
its  of  material  at  the  bottom  of  sewer  pipes  produces  several 
problems, such as reduced  flow capacity and  premature com-
bined  sewer  overflows  (Ashley  et  al. 

2004

;  Rodríguez  et  al. 

2012

). Flushing waves, also known as surge flushing technique, 

have  been  identified  as  an  efficient  (Bong,  Lau,  and  Ab  Ghani 

2016

;  Yang  et  al. 

2019

)  and  cost-effective  (Campisano  et  al. 

2019

; Campisano, Creaco, and Modica 

2007

) method for solving 

these problems. It aims to remove the deposited sediments by 
generating  waves,  which  are  produced  by  the  upstream  sto-
rage  and  further  discharge  of  water  volumes.  These  flushing 
waves  increase  the  bottom  shear  stress  and  induce  the  scour 
and resuspension of the deposited material.

The above flushing technique has been applied in several case 

studies  following  operational  and  management  practice  guides 
(Fan 

2004

;  Saegrov 

2006

;  NEIWPCC 

2003

)  in  countries  such  as 

Germany,  France,  the  USA  and  the  UK.  As  an  example,  Saegrov 
(

2006

) suggest flushing waves to remove settled deposits in sew-

ers  ranging  from  100  mm  to  1200  mm  pipe  diameter  with 
a  mandatory  cleaning  frequency  once  in  1  to  5  years.  However, 
these guides do not specify important flushing parameters such as 
the  hydraulic  and  pipe  characteristics  (i.e.  length,  slope  and 
hydraulic  roughness,  among  others),  sediment  properties  and 
flushing  volume.  The  lack  of  information  on  these  specifications 
has contributed to the fact that existing flushing practices tend to 
be  oversized.  As  an  instance,  Dettmar  (

2007

)  compared  design 

tables developed by using extensive field studies and mathema-
tical  simulations  (Chebbo  et  al. 

1996

;  Dettmar 

2005

;  Lainé  et  al. 

1998

)  and  concluded  that  smaller  flushing  volumes  and  water 

storage  heights  achieve  the  same  flushing  length  and  efficiency 

in  removing  the  volume  of  deposited  sediments,  compared  to 
operational and management practice guides.

In the last decades, several studies have quantified the flush-

ing efficiency in terms of (a) reduction of volume and/or weight 
of  sediments  (Bong,  Lau,  and  Ab  Ghani 

2016

;  Campisano  et  al. 

2019

;  Campisano,  Creaco,  and  Modica 

2008

2004

;  Creaco  and 

Bertrand-Krajewski 

2009

;  Guo  et  al. 

2004

;  Ristenpart 

1998

Shahsavari, Arnaud-Fassetta, and Campisano 

2017

), (b) changes 

in deposited bed thickness (Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani 

2013

2016

Campisano  et  al. 

2019

;  Campisano,  Creaco,  and  Modica 

2008

2007

2004

; Dettmar, Rietsch, and Lorenz 

2002

; Ristenpart 

1998

Shahsavari, Arnaud-Fassetta,  and Campisano 

2017

; Shirazi  et  al. 

2014

),  (c)  variation  of  concentrations  of  total  suspended  solids 

(Ristenpart 

1998

;  Sakakibara 

1996

),  (d)  increase  in  the  bottom 

shear  stress  (Bertrand-Krajewski et  al. 

2003

;  Campisano,  Creaco, 

and  Modica 

2008

;  Campisano  and  Modica 

2003

;  Dettmar, 

Rietsch,  and  Lorenz 

2002

;  Ristenpart 

1998

;  Schaffner  and 

Steinhardt 

2006

;  Yang  et  al. 

2019

),  (e)  length  of  the  channel 

that  can  be  potentially  cleaned  (Bertrand-Krajewski  et  al. 

2003

Bong,  Lau,  and  Ab  Ghani 

2013

;  Dettmar,  Rietsch,  and  Lorenz 

2002

;  Shahsavari,  Arnaud-Fassetta,  and  Campisano 

2017

;  Yang 

et  al. 

2019

)  and  (f)  stored  water  volume  discharged  (Bertrand- 

Krajewski et al. 

2003

; Dettmar, Rietsch, and Lorenz 

2002

; Fan et al. 

2001

). These studies were carried out in both laboratory and real 

sewer  flumes  using  different  sediment  characteristics,  stored 
water  volumes  and  geometrical  characteristics  of  the  flume.  As 
a result, a list of parameters affecting the flushing efficiency was 
identified and classified in three main groups: (i) flushing hydrau-
lics,  (ii)  pipe  geometry  and  (iii)  sediment  properties.  Flushing 
hydraulic parameters include water velocity (V

f

), shear stress (τ), 

the  water  level  in  the  pipe  (Y),  flowrate  (Q),  stored  water  head 
(h

o

)  and  stored  water  volume  discharged  (V

a

).  In  the  pipe 

CONTACT 

Carlos Montes 

cd.montes1256@uniandes.edu.co

URBAN WATER JOURNAL                                  
2022, VOL. 19, NO. 1, 1–14 
https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2021.1948077

© 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

geometry, parameters as the slope (S

o

), diameter (D), length (L), 

cross-section shape factor (β) and composite roughness (k

c

) have 

been included. Finally, sediment properties include mean parti-
cle diameter (d), sediment thickness (y

s

) and width (W

b

), specific 

gravity (SG), porosity (η) and density (ρ

s

).

The previous three groups of parameters have been used for 

implementing numerical models useful to quantify the flushing 
efficiency.  Models  found  in  the  literature  are  focused  on  (i) 
solving complex mathematical structures, (ii) proposing simple 
dimensionless  equations  for  estimating  sediment  transport 
rates  and  (iii)  using  Machine  Learning  (ML)  and  Artificial 
Intelligence  (AI)  techniques  for  finding  patterns  in  data  and 
predicting bedload and suspended load transport.

In the first approach, the one-dimensional Saint-Venant equa-

tions  (Campisano,  Creaco,  and  Modica 

2006

;  Campisano  and 

Modica 

2003

; De Sutter, Huygens, and Verhoeven 

1999

), coupled 

with  the  Exner  equation  for  uniform  (Campisano,  Creaco,  and 
Modica 

2007

2004

; Creaco and Bertrand-Krajewski 

2009

; Shirazi 

et al. 

2014

) and non-uniform (Campisano et al. 

2019

) sediments, 

are used for predicting bed sediment thickness changes during 
the  flushing  operation.  More  complex  models  involve  the  two- 
dimensional (Caviedes-Voullième et al. 

2017

; Yu and Duan 

2014

and three-dimensional (Schaffner and Steinhardt 

2006

) solutions 

of  the  Saint-Venant  equations.  An  example  of  the  literature 
models is as follows: 

@

U

@

t

þ

@

F U

ð Þ

@

x

¼

D U

ð Þ

(1) 

where UF U

ð Þ

and D U

ð Þ

are defined as follows: 

¼

A

Q

A

s

2

4

3

5; F U

ð Þ ¼

Q

V

f

þ

F

h

ρ

1

ρ

Q

s

2

4

3

5; D U

ð Þ ¼

0

gA S

o

V

f

2

k

c

2

R

4=3

0

2

4

3

5

(2) 

where  F

is  the  hydrostatic  force  over  the  cross-section,  ρ  the 

water  density,  R  the  hydraulic  radius,  A  is  the  cross-section 
wetted  area,  A

is  the  cross-section  sediment  bed  area  and  Q

the sediment flow rate.

In  the  second  approach  mentioned  above,  several  authors 

have  developed  analytical  equations  for  predicting  the  number 
of  flushes  required  to  move  the  deposited  sediment  bed  (Bong, 
Lau, and Ab Ghani 

2013

; Chebbo et al. 

1996

). Likewise, the effects 

of pipe slope, bottom roughness, storage water level, and down-
stream  water  level,  among  others  (Yang  et  al. 

2019

;  Kuriqui, 

Koçileri,  and  Ardiçlioğlu 

2020

)  have  also  been  studied  in  the 

past.  As  an  example,  Bong,  Lau,  and  Ab  Ghani  (

2013

)  proposed 

the following equation, where n

is the number of flushes required 

to move the deposited sediment bed by 1 m: 

n

f

¼

251:43y

s

þ

6:57

(3) 

In  the  third  approach,  several  studies  using  ML  and  AI  have 
been  developed  for  predicting  both  bedload  and  suspended 
load  transport  in  sewers,  flumes,  and  streams.  Several  techni-
ques  as  Artificial  Neural  Networks  (Wan  Mohtar  et  al. 

2018

Bajirao  et  al. 

2021

),  Random  Forests  (Khosravi  et  al. 

2020

Safari 

2020

;  Montes,  Kapelan,  and  Saldarriaga 

2021

),  and 

Vector  Machines  (Ebtehaj  et  al. 

2017

),  among  others,  have 

been  trained  with  experimental  data  collected  at  laboratory 

scale  and  tested  with  benchmark  data  found  in  the  literature. 
These  models  outperform  traditional  regression  formulas  dur-
ing the training stage but tend to underperform when applied 
to  external  datasets  collected  in  sewers  and  flumes  (Montes, 
Kapelan, and Saldarriaga 

2021

), i.e., during the testing stage.

Numerical studies mentioned above, based on the solution 

of the Saint-Venant and Exner coupled-equations for sediment 
transport under unsteady flow conditions, show similar predic-
tions  of  the  sediment  thickness  changes  compared  to  the 
experimental data collected, i.e., the models show good accu-
racy prediction. Despite the solutions and simulations based on 
Saint Venant-Exner equations showing good accuracy, in prac-
tice, the application for operational and management practices 
is complex and non-pragmatic. Also, the analytical and dimen-
sionless equations proposed by Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani (

2013

and  Yang  et  al.  (

2019

),  do  not  include  important  parameters 

such as the pipe/flume geometry and the sediment character-
istics.  Finally,  AI  and  ML  models  are  largely  black-box  models 
(Montes,  Kapelan,  and  Saldarriaga 

2021

),  limiting  their  inter-

pretability for practical applications.

The  above  gaps  are  addressed  here  by  developing  a  new 

parsimonious  regression-based  model  using  the  Evolutionary 
Polynomial Regression – Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (EPR- 
MOGA) (Giustolisi and Savic 

2009

) strategy. EPR-MOGA is a data- 

driven  method  which  combines  genetic  algorithm  with 
evolutionary  computing  for  finding  polynomial  structures.  Due 
to  its  characteristics,  the  returned  symbolic  expressions  can  be 
compared  with  existing  models  in  terms  of  the  input  variables, 
exponent coefficients, and technical insight on the phenomenon 
(Montes et al. 

2020a

) while reducing the risk of overfitting.

This  paper  aims  to  propose  a  new  model  for  predicting  the 

sediment  transport  rate  during  flushing  operations  in  sewers. 
The novelty of this model is the inclusion of flushing ‘dam break’ 
hydrograph, pipe geometry, and deposited sediment character-
istics  in a simple polynomial expression. The  new model  devel-
oped here can be used to optimize flushing schemes and reduce 
the volume of water required for cleaning sewers.

2. Experimental methods and data collection

The  collection  of  experimental  data  was  carried  out  in  two 
pipes  with  diameters  of  209  mm  and  595  mm  (Montes  et  al. 

2020b

),  both  located  at  the  Hydraulics  Laboratory  of  the 

University of the Andes, Colombia. A sediment bed with a near- 
uniform thickness and width was prepared at the bottom of the 
pipes, using uniformly graded sediment material ranging from 
0.21  mm  to  2.6  mm.  These  particles  had  a  specific  gravity 
between  2.57  and  2.67,  which  was  calculated  using  the  pycn-
ometer  method  (ASTM  D854-14 

2014

).  The  experiments  were 

carried  out  under  unsteady  flow  conditions,  simulating  the 
‘dam  break’  waves  produced  during  a  flushing  event.  The 
methodology  used  for  data  collection  and  further  details  of 
both experimental setups are described below.

2.1. 209 mm pipe setup

The 209 mm diameter acrylic pipe had a length of 10.58 m and 
was supported on six hydraulic jacks, which allowed to vary the 
pipe slope between 0.64% and 1.20%. This pipe was connected 

2

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

to  a  200  mm  solenoid  valve,  which  controlled  the  inflow  into 
the  setup  from  a  3.5  m

upstream  tank.  A  downstream  tank 

with a V-Notch weir was used to measure the water discharge. 
A real-time water  level sensor  was used  to measure the  water 
height over the weir to calculate the water discharge rate using 
the  V-Notch  equation.  The  calculated  discharge  was  also 
checked  using  an  ABB-  Electromagnetic  flowmeter  sensor 
installed upstream of the pipe. Two additional real-time water 
level sensors were installed along the pipe, aiming to measure 
the stage hydrograph produced by the flushing waves. 

Figure 1 

shows the general scheme of the experimental setup.

The  experimental  data  was  collected  as  follows.  Firstly,  the 

solenoid valve was fully opened, allowing a base flowrate ran-
ging  from  0.002  l  s

−1 

to  0.414  l  s

−1

.  The  opening  of  this  valve 

simulates  the  ‘dam  break  hydrograph’  produced  during 
a flushing  operation  in  a real  sewer  pipe  (e.g.  using  a Hydrass 
or  a  Hydroself  flushing  gate).  Secondly,  a  sediment  bed  with 
near-uniform thickness and width was located at the bottom of 
the pipe. At this point, the base flowrate helped the formation 
of  the  deposited  bed  along  a  3.3  m  section.  Thirdly,  the  sole-
noid valve was completely closed for storing a volume of water 
between  0.10  m

and  0.31  m

in  the  upstream  tank.  Fourthly, 

the  solenoid  valve  was  opened  between  60%  and  100%  and 
the opening time was set to 15 sec for all tests. When the first 
discharged wave reached the sediment bed, the movement of 
the bed was tracked over time. The sediment velocity (V

s

) was 

calculated  using  the  values  of  the  time  and  deposited  bed 
displacement during the peak flow. The above procedure was 
repeated  for  different  accumulated  upstream  water  volume 
and percentage of the solenoid valve opening.

2.2. 595 mm pipe setup

The pipe was 10.5 m long and supported on a mechanical steel 
truss,  which  allowed  to  modify  the  slope  in  a  range  between 
0.04%  and  3.44%.  The  base  flow  for  the  experiments,  ranging 
from  1.03  l  s

−1 

to  9.98  l  s

−1

,  was  provided  by  a  40  BHP  pump 

that  supplied  water  to  a  30  m

upstream  storage  which  was 

directly  connected  to  the  pipe.  For  evaluating  unsteady  flow 
conditions in this pipe, a second 10 BHP submersible pump was 
located  inside  the  downstream  tank.  This  pump  was  directly 
connected  to  the  upstream  tank  and  was  controlled  with 
a variable frequency drive programmed before the experiment 
to create a pulse with a maximum peak flow of 30 l s

−1

. Three 

water  level  sensors  were  used  to  record  water  depths  in  the 
experimental setup. Two of them were installed in the pipe to 
collect  the  stage  hydrograph,  and  one  was  installed  in  the 
upstream  tank.  Full  details  of  the  experimental  setup  were 
described in Montes et al. (

2020b

) and are shown in 

Figure 2

.

For  this  setup,  the  data  was  collected  as  follows.  Firstly,  the 

pipe  slope  was  adjusted  using  the  mechanical  steel  truss  and 
measured  with  a  dumpy  level.  Secondly,  the  flow  control  valve 
on the upstream tank was opened to supply a base flow to the 
pipe.  Thirdly,  a  deposited  sediment  bed  with  a  near-uniform 
width was prepared at the bottom of the pipe over a minimum 
length of 1.5 m. At this point, to compare the flushing efficiency 
under  similar  conditions,  the  maximum  sediment  bed  velocity 
was verified as 0.03 m s

−1

. If this condition was not fulfilled, the 

pipe  slope  or  the  base  flow  were  changed.  Fourthly,  the  sub-
mersible pump, with  its variable frequency  drive, was  activated 
to simulate the ‘dam break hydrograph’, which is similar to those 
produced by the flushing gates in real sewers. The water levels 
were recorded each 0.025 s and the position of the sediment bed 

Figure 1. 

Experimental setup used to collect the unsteady flow data in the 209 mm acrylic pipe.

Figure 2. 

Experimental setup used to collect the unsteady flow data in the 595 mm PVC pipe.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

3

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

was  tracked.  The  sediment  velocity  was  calculated  using  the 
same procedure followed on the acrylic setup.

2.3. Experimental data collected

Using  the  experimental  rig  and  approach  described  above, 
a  total  of  57  and  64  experiments  were  carried  out  in  the 
209  mm  acrylic  pipe  and  595  mm  PVC  pipe,  respectively. 
Several variables related to the pipe geometry, sediment prop-
erties,  and  flushing  hydraulics,  including  the  base  time  (t

b

), 

peak time (t

p

), base flow (Q

b

), and peak flow (Q

p

) were recorded 

in  each  experiment,  as  shown  in 

Figure  3

.  The  experimental 

data  collected  in  both  acrylic  and  PVC  pipes  are  presented  in 

Table 1

, where S

is the pipe slope, D  the pipe diameter, Y  the 

water  level  in  the  pipe,  R  the  hydraulic  radius,  d  the  mean 
particle diameter, SG the specific gravity, y

the sediment thick-

ness, V

the water velocity, and V

the sediment velocity.

A  flushing  discharge  hydrograph  and  a  plot  showing  the 

sediment  bed  position  related  with  each  run  are  presented  in 

Table  1

.  The  shape  and  magnitude  of  the  hydrograph  are 

directly related to the sediment bed velocity, and consequently, 
the  sediment  bed  position.  As  an  example,  for  six  runs,  the 
variation  in  the  sediment  bed  position  and  hydrograph  char-
acteristics,  in  both  acrylic  and  PVC  pipe,  are  presented  in 

Figure  4

.  Full  details  of  each  run  shown  in 

Figure  4 

are  pre-

sented in 

Table 1

.

Figure  4(a,  b

)  show  the  relation  between  the  flushing  dis-

charge  hydrograph  and  the  sediment  bed  position  for  tests 
conducted on the acrylic pipe. As seen in these figures, particle 
size  is  a  more  important  variable  in  defining  the  sediment 
position,  compared  to  the  peak  flow  in  the  hydrograph.  Even 
though the run 82 considers a higher peak flow (Q

= 5.55 l s

−1

), 

the final position of the sediment bed (= 0.41 m) is lower than 
the run 96 (= 2.62 m) when the peak flow is lower (Q

= 2.08 l 

s

−1

). This occurs because the particle diameter is more relevant 

compared to the peak flow.

Figure  4(c,  d

)  show  the  relation  between  the  flushing  dis-

charge hydrograph and the sediment bed position for tests in 
595 mm setup. The relationship between the discharge hydro-
graph  and  the  sediment  bed  position  is  proportional.  For  run 

no. 36 and 61, the mean particle diameter was 2.60 mm, but the 
pipe  slope  was  1.65%  and  1.82%,  respectively. 

Figure  4(d

shows  that  maintaining  the  mean  particle  diameter  constant 
as the pipe slope increases, the final bed position increases.

3. Model development

3.1. Graphical analysis

A graphical analysis was developed to visualize the relationships 
between  the  variables  collected  in  each  experiment.  The  rela-
tionship between sediment velocity and flow velocity (V

s

=

V

f

) was 

plotted  against  other  dimensionless  parameters,  as  shown  in 

Figure 5

. These dimensionless parameters have been previously 

identified as relevant for predicting sediment transport in sewer 
pipes  in  previous  literature  (Ab  Ghani  and  Azamathulla 

2011

Ebtehaj  and  Bonakdari 

2016

;  May  et  al. 

1996

;  Kuriqui,  Koçileri, 

and  Ardiçlioğlu 

2020

;  Montes,  Kapelan,  and  Saldarriaga 

2021

). 

Two  of  these  parameters  include  the  dimensionless  grain  size 
(d=R) and the Shields parameter (ψ), defined in Equation (4): 

ψ ¼

RS

o

SG

1

ð

Þ

d

(4) 

Based on the results shown in 

Figure 5

, the following observa-

tions can be made:

In  general,  higher  values  of  the  Shields  parameter  lead  to 
higher values of V

s

=

V

f

. This can be clearly seen in the acrylic 

pipe  (

Figure  5(a

))  because  of  the  constant  slope  value 

adopted in the experimental rig. Furthermore, high values 
of S

and lead to higher sediment velocities due to higher 

critical  shearing  stress  (i.e.  the  applied  forces  are  higher 
than  the  submerged  weight  of  the  particle).  In  contrast, 
deposited materials with high density of particle diameters 
result in lower sediment velocities.

The  direct  relationship  between  V

s

=

V

and  the  Shields 

parameter coincides with the inversely proportional rela-
tionship  between  V

s

=

V

and  d=R,  shown  in 

Figure  5(c,d)

This  is  observed  because  the  Shields  parameter  includes 
the ratio R=d, as shown in Equation (4).

Figure 3. 

Variable definition of the flushing discharge hydrograph.

4

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

Table 1. 

Experimental data collected for studying flushing waves efficiency on sewer pipes.

Run no.

S

o

D

Y

R

d

SG

y

s

t

b

t

p

Q

b

Q

p

V

f

V

s

(%)

(mm)

(mm)

(mm)

(mm)

(-)

(mm)

(s)

(s)

(l s

−1

)

(l s

−1

)

(m s

−1

)

(m s

−1

)

1

0.805

595

70.35

41.96

0.47

2.66

10.14

154

59

5.27

25.48

1.02

0.07

2

0.805

595

57.43

34.62

0.47

2.66

8.26

141

57

5.45

16.76

0.89

0.05

3

0.805

595

53.61

31.34

0.47

2.66

10.53

131

57

5.45

16.49

0.82

0.04

4

1.186

595

57.82

36.46

0.47

2.66

2.49

121

59

4.89

20.53

1.20

0.05

5

1.229

595

54.70

31.17

0.47

2.66

12.55

115

55

4.81

15.97

0.99

0.03

6

1.229

595

61.66

36.67

0.47

2.66

9.91

120

55

5.07

20.27

1.14

0.04

7

1.229

595

50.94

31.92

0.47

2.66

3.90

183

58

1.03

11.10

1.09

0.05

8

1.229

595

67.63

39.54

0.47

2.66

12.15

124

57

5.03

24.47

1.19

0.05

9

1.229

595

62.04

37.24

1.51

2.66

8.97

39

33

9.98

12.06

1.16

0.02

10

1.525

595

42.69

22.71

1.51

2.66

13.54

117

58

5.17

11.84

0.87

0.02

11

2.034

595

37.55

19.29

1.51

2.66

13.28

111

59

4.92

11.54

0.89

0.09

12

2.331

595

35.95

19.45

1.51

2.66

10.96

182

57

3.99

10.93

0.97

0.10

13

0.763

595

67.43

38.31

1.51

2.66

14.87

113

56

4.42

11.71

0.90

0.00

14

0.763

595

70.23

39.60

1.51

2.66

15.99

126

69

9.13

22.46

0.92

0.03

15

0.763

595

81.75

47.82

1.51

2.66

13.12

135

63

9.40

31.43

1.07

0.04

16

1.123

595

58.13

34.59

1.51

2.66

9.55

118

60

9.23

17.93

1.04

0.03

17

1.123

595

64.66

37.76

1.51

2.66

11.97

118

57

9.37

22.36

1.10

0.04

18

1.186

595

57.59

29.85

1.51

2.66

19.13

149

79

3.59

20.04

0.92

0.07

19

1.186

595

52.88

28.98

1.51

2.66

14.70

149

88

3.95

16.45

0.91

0.04

20

1.186

595

64.30

36.57

1.51

2.66

14.31

195

93

3.51

24.52

1.09

0.09

21

0.847

595

69.70

40.25

1.51

2.66

13.64

185

55

3.72

20.71

0.99

0.03

22

0.847

595

51.24

28.32

1.51

2.66

13.83

104

8

7.28

7.33

0.76

0.01

23

1.589

595

32.25

14.83

1.51

2.66

14.35

118

82

4.36

7.24

0.65

0.05

24

0.847

595

63.16

36.41

2.60

2.64

12.98

120

76

4.71

12.53

0.92

0.01

25

0.847

595

66.11

36.30

2.60

2.64

17.48

156

86

4.10

16.57

0.90

0.01

26

0.847

595

72.84

43.20

2.60

2.64

10.93

161

83

4.13

20.88

1.06

0.03

27

0.847

595

105.64

61.10

2.60

2.64

15.39

167

65

4.11

24.98

1.34

0.02

28

1.059

595

62.36

34.80

2.60

2.64

15.48

143

75

4.22

11.91

0.99

0.01

29

1.059

595

54.15

28.78

2.60

2.64

16.77

154

83

4.02

16.63

0.85

0.03

30

1.186

595

59.13

33.26

2.60

2.64

14.30

143

67

3.69

19.77

1.01

0.03

31

1.186

595

67.08

38.56

2.60

2.64

13.76

148

74

3.57

23.71

1.14

0.02

32

1.483

595

39.34

18.73

2.60

2.64

16.36

176

88

3.45

10.96

0.73

0.02

33

1.483

595

46.74

24.88

2.60

2.64

14.66

136

80

3.52

15.45

0.91

0.03

34

1.483

595

53.25

28.81

2.60

2.64

15.54

186

72

3.39

19.73

1.01

0.04

35

1.483

595

59.57

32.28

2.60

2.64

16.95

184

79

3.42

23.61

1.10

0.07

36

1.653

595

38.51

16.34

2.60

2.64

19.13

134

82

3.75

11.36

0.69

0.03

37

1.653

595

46.08

23.02

2.60

2.64

17.21

141

84

3.76

15.96

0.90

0.09

38

1.653

595

52.56

28.02

2.60

2.64

16.18

146

70

3.71

20.08

1.04

0.12

39

1.653

595

59.13

33.13

2.60

2.64

14.58

147

64

3.64

23.79

1.19

0.12

40

1.568

595

38.73

18.76

0.47

2.66

15.60

135

87

3.64

11.58

0.76

0.06

41

1.568

595

46.16

24.41

0.47

2.66

14.80

142

81

3.73

15.96

0.92

0.08

42

1.568

595

53.90

29.62

0.47

2.66

14.77

146

87

3.66

20.35

1.07

0.09

43

1.568

595

59.10

34.08

0.47

2.66

12.39

151

81

3.75

24.25

1.20

0.13

44

1.822

595

37.55

18.70

0.47

2.66

14.29

140

87

4.06

11.92

0.82

0.09

45

1.822

595

45.29

22.96

0.47

2.66

16.33

148

88

4.00

16.48

0.95

0.13

46

1.822

595

51.59

29.70

0.47

2.66

11.33

152

81

3.95

20.87

1.17

0.14

47

2.034

595

35.08

19.49

0.47

2.66

9.71

121

84

3.97

10.64

0.92

0.15

48

2.034

595

42.85

24.99

0.47

2.66

9.05

161

89

3.26

14.75

1.11

0.13

49

2.034

595

50.35

30.68

0.47

2.66

6.79

7

78

3.56

20.07

1.32

0.14

50

2.034

595

54.22

33.47

0.47

2.66

5.64

178

60

3.56

23.79

1.42

0.21

51

2.246

595

34.90

21.54

0.47

2.66

4.68

127

75

4.36

11.38

1.09

0.13

52

2.246

595

42.64

25.31

0.47

2.66

7.95

159

77

3.78

15.90

1.19

0.15

53

2.246

595

35.17

17.28

2.60

2.64

13.82

131

78

4.07

11.19

0.86

0.10

54

2.246

595

42.78

22.75

2.60

2.64

13.58

142

88

3.62

15.55

1.06

0.14

55

2.246

595

47.24

27.46

2.60

2.64

9.96

146

85

3.62

19.82

1.24

0.17

56

2.246

595

52.77

31.74

2.60

2.64

8.10

142

79

3.72

23.74

1.40

0.18

57

2.076

595

36.93

19.14

2.60

2.64

12.77

136

85

3.90

11.87

0.90

0.09

58

2.076

595

43.16

24.38

2.60

2.64

10.84

11

77

3.69

16.02

1.09

0.12

59

2.076

595

50.20

28.50

2.60

2.64

11.99

153

92

3.67

20.34

1.21

0.14

60

2.076

595

54.70

32.31

2.60

2.64

9.85

154

79

3.79

24.16

1.35

0.14

61

1.822

595

36.34

17.74

2.60

2.64

14.46

123

84

3.54

10.84

0.79

0.04

62

1.822

595

43.56

25.20

2.60

2.64

9.63

162

85

3.20

15.12

1.05

0.12

63

1.822

595

50.97

30.34

2.60

2.64

8.79

171

78

3.18

19.05

1.21

0.09

64

1.822

595

56.21

32.54

2.60

2.64

11.66

168

87

3.25

23.71

1.25

0.11

65

0.644

209

34.99

20.17

2.60

2.64

5.60

101

18

0.08

3.80

0.55

0.02

66

0.644

209

49.27

27.29

2.60

2.64

8.22

101

16

0.01

6.60

0.68

0.02

67

0.644

209

51.63

27.99

2.60

2.64

9.89

101

14

0.02

6.84

0.68

0.02

68

0.644

209

28.15

16.32

2.60

2.64

4.98

101

20

0.14

1.99

0.48

0.01

69

0.644

209

30.78

16.70

2.60

2.64

7.96

101

19

0.11

2.45

0.47

0.00

70

0.644

209

40.49

23.10

2.60

2.64

6.26

101

17

0.08

4.73

0.61

0.02

71

0.644

209

53.26

29.33

2.60

2.64

8.49

101

15

0.02

7.37

0.71

0.03

72

0.644

209

35.58

20.28

2.60

2.64

6.26

101

20

0.12

3.62

0.55

0.01

73

0.644

209

40.61

23.32

2.60

2.64

5.82

101

18

0.06

4.58

0.62

0.02

(Continued)

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

5

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

Figure  5(e

)  shows  the  inversely  proportional  relationship 

between  V

s

=

V

and  the  dimensionless  parameter  Q

b

=

Q

p

meaning that higher and steeper discharge hydrographs 
(i.e. lower ratios Q

b

=

Q

p

) show higher V

s

=

V

values.

In  general,  based  on  what  was  previously  mentioned, 
higher  values  of  S

and  R  and  lower  values  of  d,  SG,  and 

Q

b

=

Q

p

lead to higher sediment velocities V

s

.

3.2. Evolutionary polynomial regression model

A new regression-based model was developed here to predict 
the  dimensionless  ratio  V

s

=

V

during  flushing  operation.  The 

new  model  includes  the  group  of  parameters  identified  in 
previous  studies  (Ab  Ghani  and  Azamathulla 

2011

;  Ebtehaj 

and  Bonakdari 

2016

;  May  et  al. 

1996

;  Montes,  Kapelan,  and 

Saldarriaga 

2021

)  and  the  graphic  analysis  carried  out  for  the 

experimentally collected data, as shown in 

Figure 5

.

Evolutionary  polynomial  regression  (EPR)  is  a  hybrid  regres-

sion technique that combines numerical and symbolic regression 
(Giustolisi  and  Savic 

2006

2004

).  In  its  original  formulation,  it 

used single-objective genetic algorithms to explore the formula 
space, and then it estimates the least-squares regression coeffi-
cients.  This  technique  has  proved  to  be  effective  when  the 
number  of  polynomial  terms  is  not  large  (Giustolisi  and  Savic 

2009

).  To  solve  these  issues,  Giustolisi  and  Savic  (Giustolisi  and 

Savic 

2009

)  introduced  the  EPR  technique  combined  with 

a Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA). This novel techni-
que  maximises  the  model  accuracy  (i.e.  minimises  the  sum  of 
squared errors) and minimises the number of polynomial coeffi-
cients,  and  therefore  improves  the  exploration  of  the  space  of 

Table 1. 

(Continued).

Run no.

S

o

D

Y

R

d

SG

y

s

t

b

t

p

Q

b

Q

p

V

f

V

s

(%)

(mm)

(mm)

(mm)

(mm)

(-)

(mm)

(s)

(s)

(l s

−1

)

(l s

−1

)

(m s

−1

)

(m s

−1

)

74

0.644

209

45.95

25.29

2.60

2.64

8.76

101

17

0.03

5.42

0.64

0.01

75

0.644

209

52.17

28.92

2.60

2.64

7.96

101

16

0.03

7.22

0.71

0.03

76

0.644

209

29.87

16.87

2.60

2.64

6.26

101

21

0.11

2.06

0.48

0.01

77

0.644

209

33.61

19.44

2.60

2.64

5.39

101

19

0.10

2.75

0.54

0.01

78

0.644

209

44.28

24.82

2.60

2.64

7.45

101

18

0.02

5.17

0.64

0.02

79

0.644

209

47.12

26.13

2.60

2.64

8.22

101

18

0.01

5.90

0.66

0.02

80

0.644

209

38.03

21.54

2.60

2.64

6.72

101

19

0.08

3.80

0.58

0.01

81

0.644

209

41.49

23.59

2.60

2.64

6.49

101

18

0.05

4.59

0.62

0.02

82

0.644

209

43.13

23.90

2.60

2.64

8.22

101

17

0.04

5.55

0.61

0.01

83

0.644

209

44.99

24.43

2.60

2.64

9.60

101

16

0.02

6.11

0.62

0.02

84

0.644

209

38.93

21.05

2.60

2.64

9.31

101

18

0.04

4.51

0.55

0.01

85

0.644

209

47.10

25.93

2.60

2.64

8.76

101

17

0.02

5.83

0.65

0.01

86

0.644

209

38.30

22.59

0.47

2.66

3.91

101

17

0.10

4.36

0.62

0.06

87

0.644

209

51.25

29.60

0.47

2.66

3.68

101

16

0.00

7.36

0.76

0.11

88

0.644

209

52.44

29.99

0.47

2.66

4.65

101

15

0.01

7.64

0.75

0.10

89

0.644

209

29.07

17.09

0.47

2.66

4.40

101

19

0.21

2.22

0.50

0.03

90

0.644

209

33.05

19.59

0.47

2.66

3.91

101

17

0.19

2.65

0.56

0.04

91

0.644

209

41.19

24.21

0.47

2.66

3.86

101

18

0.04

4.99

0.65

0.08

92

0.644

209

56.85

32.46

0.47

2.66

3.51

101

15

0.00

8.02

0.81

0.13

93

0.644

209

39.63

23.20

0.47

2.66

4.40

101

17

0.07

4.08

0.62

0.05

94

0.644

209

43.42

25.52

0.47

2.66

3.46

101

17

0.08

4.99

0.68

0.06

95

0.644

209

47.40

27.47

0.47

2.66

4.21

101

16

0.04

5.56

0.71

0.07

96

0.644

209

30.86

18.45

0.47

2.66

3.46

101

19

0.32

2.08

0.54

0.03

97

0.644

209

32.77

19.21

0.47

2.66

4.59

101

20

0.11

2.80

0.54

0.04

98

0.644

209

42.21

24.97

0.47

2.66

3.03

101

19

0.41

4.22

0.67

0.06

99

0.644

209

37.41

21.71

0.47

2.66

5.18

101

19

0.09

3.79

0.59

0.05

100

0.644

209

41.66

24.19

0.47

2.66

4.86

101

17

0.07

4.63

0.64

0.05

101

0.644

209

43.34

25.14

0.47

2.66

4.78

101

18

0.06

5.71

0.66

0.06

102

0.644

209

48.65

28.13

0.47

2.66

4.21

101

16

0.03

6.67

0.72

0.09

103

0.644

209

36.32

21.27

0.35

2.65

4.59

101

18

0.06

4.24

0.58

0.05

104

0.644

209

51.00

29.01

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

15

0.01

6.81

0.73

0.08

105

0.644

209

50.99

29.11

0.35

2.65

5.18

101

15

0.01

6.90

0.73

0.09

106

0.644

209

28.62

16.45

0.35

2.65

5.39

101

18

0.23

2.00

0.48

0.02

107

0.644

209

32.66

18.92

0.35

2.65

5.26

101

17

0.19

2.67

0.53

0.03

108

0.644

209

42.79

24.72

0.35

2.65

5.18

101

16

0.07

4.80

0.65

0.04

109

0.644

209

54.41

30.76

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

17

0.00

7.36

0.76

0.07

110

0.644

209

37.13

21.55

0.35

2.65

5.18

101

18

0.10

3.75

0.59

0.03

111

0.644

209

41.56

24.21

0.35

2.65

4.59

101

17

0.08

4.71

0.64

0.05

112

0.644

209

45.08

25.81

0.35

2.65

5.73

101

17

0.07

5.47

0.67

0.05

113

0.644

209

54.08

30.60

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

15

0.03

7.31

0.76

0.08

114

0.644

209

29.46

16.96

0.35

2.65

5.39

101

20

0.19

2.02

0.49

0.03

115

0.644

209

33.04

18.92

0.35

2.65

5.90

101

19

0.13

2.74

0.53

0.03

116

0.644

209

44.81

25.64

0.35

2.65

5.82

101

17

0.04

5.18

0.66

0.04

117

0.644

209

48.43

27.71

0.35

2.65

5.39

101

17

0.02

5.88

0.70

0.05

118

0.644

209

39.31

22.65

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

18

0.09

3.92

0.60

0.04

119

0.644

209

41.99

24.16

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

17

0.08

4.59

0.63

0.04

120

0.644

209

43.59

25.04

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

18

0.04

5.64

0.65

0.04

121

0.644

209

44.65

25.62

0.35

2.65

5.60

101

17

0.06

6.12

0.66

0.07

6

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

symbolic  formulas.  EPR-MOGA  considers  some  pseudo- 
polynomial expressions such as (Giustolisi and Savic 

2009

): 

^

¼ a

0

þ

X

m

j¼1

a

j

X

1

ð

Þ

ES j;1

ð

Þ

� . . . �

X

k

ð

Þ

ES j;k

ð

Þ

f

X

1

ð

Þ

ES j;kþ1

ð

Þ

� . . .

f

X

k

ð

Þ

ES j;2k

ð

Þ

(5) 

where  ^

Y  is  the  vector  of  model  predictions;  ES  and  j  the 

matrix  of  candidate  exponents  and  the  inner  function, 
respectively,  both  selected  by  the  user;  m  the  number  of 
terms;  a

the  bias  term;  a

the  adjustable  parameters  esti-

mated  by  linear  least  squares  and  X

the  candidate  expla-

natory  variables.  The  inner  function  f  defined  by  the  user 
can  be  logarithmic,  exponential,  tangent  hyperbolic,  or 
secant  hyperbolic,  and  must  be  selected  according  to  the 
physics  of  the  problem  studied.  The  EPR  technique  returns 
a  range  of  models  showing  the  influence  of  different 
explanatory  factors  by  progressively  adding  these  as 
input  variables  to  monomial  formulas,  starting  from  the 
most  important  ones.  For  each  EPR  identified  model,  the 
following  performance  indices  are  calculated:  the  Bayesian 
Information  Criterion  (BIC)  and  the  Coefficient  of 
Determination  (R

2

),  as  shown  in  Equations  (6)  and  (7), 

respectively. 

BIC ¼

1 þ d

log n

ð Þ

n

X

n

i¼1

Y

Y

ð

Þ

2

 

!

(6) 

R

2

¼

1

P

n
i
¼1

Y

Y

ð

Þ

2

P

n
i
¼1

Y

Y

2

(7) 

where  Y

and  Y  are  the  observed  and  calculated  data, 

respectively,  n  is  the  number  of  data,  d  the  number  of 
parameters  included  in  the  model  and  Y

the  mean  of 

observed  data.  The  Coefficient  of  Determination  measures 
the  fraction  of  variance  that  can  be  explained.  Note  that 
this  coefficient  varies  between  0  and  1,  where  1  denotes 
a  perfect  match  between  observed  and  calculated  data.  The 
Bayesian  Information  Criterion  measures  the  trade-off 
between  accuracy  and  parsimony  of  the  model.  This  mea-
sure  penalises  formulas  with  large  number  of  parameters. 
The  model  with  the  lowest  BIC  value  is  selected  as  optimal.

The  new  model  was  constructed  to  predict  the  dimension-

less  relation  V

s

=

V

f

,  i.e.,  the  vector  of  model  predictions  ^

Y  is 

defined  as  V

s

=

V

f

.  The  matrix  of  candidate  exponents  was 

defined  with  values  ranging  from  −2.50  to  2.50,  considering 
steps of 0.1, i.e. ES ¼

2:501:40. . . 1:402:50

½

. The matrix 

of candidate explanatory variables is defined as follows: 

X

j

¼

ψ;

d

;

Q

b

Q

p

;

y

s

R

;

t

b

t

p

;

β

(8) 

Using  previous  considerations,  and  randomly  splitting  the 
experimental  data  collected  on  the  209  mm  and  595  mm 
pipes,  for  both  training  (75%  of  the  data)  and  testing  (25%  of 
the  data)  stages,  the  results  shown  in 

Table  2 

were  obtained 

using the EPR-MOGA strategy.

Table 2 

shows the Pareto front (i.e. range of models) generated 

by the EPR, together with the corresponding BIC and R

values. For 

example,  the  best  one  input  variable  model  includes  only  the 
Shields  parameter  as  an  explanatory  variable  for  predicting  the 
V

s

=

V

(V

s

=

V

f

¼

0:17ψ

0:5

).  This  is  the  least  complex,  i.e.,  most 

parsimonious  model  hence,  unsurprisingly,  it  has  a  rather  low 
prediction accuracy (BIC  = −48.21 and R

= 0.38). In contrast, the 

Figure 4. 

Example of flow hydrographs and sediment bed position for several experiments shown in 

Table 1

.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

7

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

6-variable  model  includes  all  candidate  explanatory  factors 

V

s

=

V

f

¼

2:48ψ

1:Q

b

Q

p

� �

0:3

d
R

0:y

s

R

0:t

b

t

p

� �

0:2

β

,  resulting  in 

low  parsimony  model  but  with  improved  prediction  accuracy 

(BIC  =  −92.22  and  R

=  0.64).  Based  on  this,  the  model  that 

shows the best trade-off between accuracy and parsimony is the 
model  with  three  input  variables.  This  model  is  shown  in 
Equation (9). 

Figure 5. 

Plots showing the relationships between the dimensionless velocity (V

s

=

V

f

) and other dimensionless variables in both acrylic and PVC pipe. Clustered results 

by particle diameter.

Table 2. 

Pareto solution provided by the EPR-MOGA strategy.

Terms of monomial formula

Performance Index

Number of inputs

Coefficient (a

j

)

ψ

Q

b

Q

p

d
R

y

s

R

t

b

t

p

β

BIC

R

2

1

0.17

0.50

-

-

-

-

-

−48.21

0.38

2

0.14

0.60

−0.10

-

-

-

-

−66.19

0.48

3

8.13

1.40

−0.30

0.90

-

-

-

−104.55

0.63

4

11.47

1.50

−0.30

1.00

0.10

-

-

−100.56

0.64

5

121.48

2.10

−0.20

1.60

0.80

0.10

-

−96.49

0.64

6

2.48

1.40

−0.30

0.90

0.10

−0.20

1.00

−92.22

0.64

8

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

V

s

V

f

¼

8:13

d
R

� �

0:90

RS

o

SG

1

ð

Þ

d

1:40

Q

b

Q

p

0:30

(9) 

Or rearranging the above formula to simplify the d=R term: 

V

s

V

f

¼

8:13

d
R

� �

0:50

S

o

SG

1

ð

Þ

1:40

Q

b

Q

p

0:30

(10) 

The  obtained  model  was  used  to  estimate  the  flushing  effi-
ciency  in  larger  pipes  considering  different  flow  conditions 
and  sediment  characteristics.  Further  details  are  described  in 
the section below. The model’s accuracy can be seen in 

Figure 6 

for both training and testing datasets.

As  it  can  be  seen  from  the  above  equation  and  figure, 

Equation  (10)  is  consistent  with  the  graphical  analysis  pre-
sented  in 

Figure  6

.  Further,  it  can  be  seen  from  the  model 

obtained that 

S

o

SG 1

ð

Þ

is the most important feature for predict-

ing  the  sediment  velocity  during  the  flushing  cleaning  opera-
tion – the more the pipe slope increases, the higher the particle 
velocity  is  (note  that  the 

S

o

SG 1

ð

Þ

parameter  comes  from  the 

Shields  parameter).  The  Shields  parameter  shows  the  ratio 

Figure 6. 

EPR-MOGA model accuracy for both training and testing stage.

Figure 7. 

Efficiency of flushing discharge vs particle diameter for several base and peak flow relations (0.25 < Q

b

=

Q

< 0.75) and pipe slope: a), b) and c) S

= 0.5%; d), e) 

and f) S

= 1.0% and g), h) and i) S

= 1.5%.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

9

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

between the  hydrodynamic  forces  acting  on the  particles  and 
the  resistance  due  to  gravity.  This  parameter  has  been  identi-
fied  as  one  of  the  most  relevant  for  predicting  the  incipient 
motion  in  sewers  (Delleur 

2001

;  Safari,  Mohammadi,  and  Ab 

Ghani 

2018

;  Wan  Mohtar  et  al. 

2018

).  As  mentioned  above, 

V

s

=

V

is inversely proportional to d=R, which is consistent with 

the results shown by EPR-MOGA model.

4. Results and discussion

The  new  model  shown  in  Equation  (10)  was  used  to  generate 
charts to estimate flushing efficiency as a function of the char-
acteristics  of  the  discharged  hydrograph,  the  pipe  geometry 
and  the  sediment  properties.  In  this  context,  two  flushing- 
efficiency  measures  were  defined  as  a  function  of  the  area  of 
deposited bed (A

s

) and the sediment velocity. The first measure, 

Q

s

,  is  the  volume  of  sediment  removed  by  unit  time  (i.e.  the 

sediment  flow  rate  =  A

s

V

s

).  The  second  measure,  t

e

,  is  the 

flushing  time  required  to  clean  1.0  m  of  the  pipe  (=  1=V

s

). 

Figures  7  and  8 

were  constructed  for  several  pipe  diameters 

using  previous  measures.  To  construct  these  figures,  the  less- 
significant  variables  identified  by  the  EPR-MOGA  model  (as 
shown  in 

Table  2

)  remained  constant.  The  sediment  thickness 

was defined as y

s

=

¼ 1%, the specific gravity of the sediments 

as 2.6, and the relation between the base and peak time of the 
hydrograph as t

b

=

t

p

¼

5.0.

The  following  observations  can  be  made  from 

Figures  7 

and 8

:

Q

is inversely proportional to d  and Q

b

=

Q

p

. In addition, Q

seems to be near-steady for particle diameters greater than 
1.5 mm in pipes with diameters less than 800 mm. All above 
for the same pipe slope and Q

b

=

Q

relation. Increasing the 

pipe slope directly increase the sediment transport rate.

As  the  Q

b

=

Q

ratio  increases,  the  sediment  removal  rate 

decreases. For example, in 

Figure 7(a

), when Q

b

=

Q

= 0.25 

in a 1200 mm diameter pipe containing a deposited sedi-
ment bed with d  = 1 mm, Q

= 0:5 � 10

−4 

m

3

/s, while for 

Q

b

=

Q

=  0.75  the  Q

value  changes  to  0.2 � 10

−4 

m

3

/s, 

that is 60% less (as shown in 

Figure 7(c

)).

Flushing  discharges  seem  to  be  more  efficient  in  larger 
sewer pipes. The sediment transport rate can be five times 
higher  in  2000  mm  diameter  pipes,  compared  to 
1200 mm diameter pipes.

Figure 8 

shows a direct relationship between t

and and 

Q

b

=

Q

p

. Based on this, as increases and Q

decreases, the 

required  flushing  time  to  clean  1  meter  of  the  pipe 
increases.  For  example,  in 

Figure  8(d

)  when  Q

b

=

Q

0.25  in  a  800  mm  diameter  pipe  containing  a  deposited 
sediment  bed  with  d  =  1.5  mm,  t

=  20  sec,  while  for 

Q

b

=

Q

=  0.75  the  t

value  changes  to  45  sec,  that  is 

125% more (as shown in 

Figure 8(f

))

Figure 8. 

Flushing time vs particle diameter for several base and peak flow relations (0.25 < Q

b

=

Q

< 0.75) and pipe slope: a), b) and c) S

= 0.5%; d), e) and f) S

= 1.0% 

and g), h) and i) S

= 1.5%.

10

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

The flushing time decreases as the S

and increase. That 

is, flushing is a more efficient technique in large and steep 
pipes.

4.1. Model comparison

To  test  the  accuracy  of  the  model  shown  in  Equation  (10),  the 
case study described in Laplace et al. (

2003

) was used. This case 

study  is located  in Marseille,  France, on  a combined  sewer net-
work.  Specifically,  this  study  considers  an  ovoid  section  of 
1700  mm,  120  m  long  with  a  bottom  slope  of  0.03%.  A  near- 
uniform deposited bed of 140 mm thickness was observed along 
the  entire  length  of  the  flume.  The  deposited  bed  was  charac-
terised as coarser upstream (= 8 mm) and finer downstream (
= 0.6 mm). Full details are shown in Laplace et al. (

2003

).

Using  a  Hydrass-flushing  gate  located  inside  the  section, 

a  series  of  flushes  were  conducted  for  testing  the  efficiency 
on removing the deposited material. During each flush, a total 
volume  of  6.0  m

of  water  was  discharged  into  the  pipe.  As 

reported by Laplace et al. (

2003

), the mass of particles eroded 

during  the  first  flush  was  6.3  kg,  i.e.,  the  removal  rate  was 
1.08 kg of material per 1.0 m

of water (= 1.08 kg m

−3

).

Two  existing  procedures  are  compared  with  the  new  EPR- 

MOGA model presented in Equation (10): the model proposed 
by  Bong,  Lau,  and  Ab  Ghani  (

2013

)  (i.e.  Equation  (3))  and  the 

design tables shown by Dettmar (

2007

). To compare the results, 

several  initial  conditions  are  defined  based  on  the  case  study 
description, which are outlined as follows:

(1) Thickness of the deposited bed (y

s

) = 0.14 m

(2) Peak flow during flushing operation (Q

p

) = 100 l s

−1

(3) Specific gravity of the sediments (SG) = 2.60
(4) Mean particle diameter (d) = 0.6–8.0 mm
(5) Mass of material per meter of pipe = 54.22 kg m

−1

According to Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani (

2013

), the number of 

flushes  required  to  move  1  m  of  deposited  material  can  be 
estimated by applying Equation (3). For this equation, the num-
ber of flushes is only a function of the thickness of the deposited 
bed. As a result, 42 flushes (= 250.6 m

of water) can potentially 

remove 54.22 kg of the deposited material (i.e. the removal rate is 
0.21 kg m

−3

). Design tables proposed by Dettmar (

2007

) suggest 

a flushing volume of 48 m

for a basic cleaning of the 150 m long 

sewer (i.e. a full removing of the deposited material). No removal 
rates are provided by Dettmar (

2007

).

Finally, using the new model proposed in this study, a range 

of removal rates are obtained as a function of the mean particle 

diameter.  Potentially,  a  flushing  volume  of  10.18  m

can 

remove  14.5  kg  of  deposited  material  with  a  mean  particle 
diameter  of  0.6  mm  (i.e.  the  removal  rate  is  0.40  kg  m

−3

).  By 

changing the particle size of the deposited material to 8.3 mm, 
the removal rate is 1.25 kg m

−3

.

As  shown  in 

Table  3

,  a  direct  comparison  of  the  method 

proposed  by  Dettmar  (

2007

)  and  the  results  reported  by 

Laplace  et  al.  (

2003

)  is  not  possible.  However,  this  method 

seems  to  underestimate  the  real  volume  required  to  remove 
the  deposited  bed.  Relevant  parameters  such  as  the  mean 
particle diameter and the sewer hydraulics are not included in 
this method. Due to the pipe slope in the case of study is almost 
flat, obtaining minimum shear stress of 5.0 N m

−2 

for cleaning 

the pipe, according to Dettmar (

2007

), requires larger flows.

The model presented by Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani (

2013

) is 

a  good  approach  for  determining  the  number  of  flushes 
required  to  move  the  deposited  material.  However,  because 
of  the  non-inclusion  of  relevant  pipe  hydraulics  and  sediment 
parameters,  the  results  are  underestimated,  compared  to  the 
values reported by Laplace et al. (

2003

).

4.2. Model considerations

The  new  model  presented  here  shows  good  prediction  accu-
racy  with  the  data  reported  by  Laplace  et  al.  (

2003

).  This  is 

explained by the inclusion of relevant parameters for predicting 
the removal rate during the flushing operation. The model also 
shows  good  extrapolation  capabilities  under  different  sewer 
diameters and a wide range of variations of the mean particle 
diameter.

The  Shields  parameter  was  selected  as  the  most  important 

one due to the highest value in the regression coefficient and 
the  Pareto  solution  provided  by  the  EPR-MOGA  strategy.  This 
was  expected  since  this  parameter  determines  the  threshold 
condition  of  sediment  initiation  motion.  The  sediment  thick-
ness  parameter  is  less  important  for  defining  the  sediment 
velocity  during  the  flushing  operation  due  to  the  low  regres-
sion coefficient presented in 

Table 2

. As a result, the model can 

be  used  in  both combined  and  storm  sewers,  where  the  sedi-
ment thickness ranges from 10 mm to 100 mm and 10 mm to 
330 mm, respectively (Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani 

2016

).

The model includes the peak flow as an explanatory variable 

for predicting sediment transport rate. Higher peak flow implies 
a higher removal rate since higher shear stresses are generated 
at  the  bottom  of  the  pipe.  The  observed  shear  stress  values 
(ranging  from  2.0  N/m

to  6.5  N/m

in  the  PVC  pipe)  are  con-

sistent with those reported in the literature for the erosion and 
transport  of  bed  material  (Dettmar 

2007

;  Campisano,  Creaco, 

Table 3. 

Comparison of results for predicting the flushing efficiency in Laplace et al. (

2003

) case of study.

Reference

Removal 

rate 

[kg m

−3

]

Observations

Laplace et al. (

2003

)

0.93

Original case of Study reported in a trunk combined sewer in Marseille, France

Dettmar (

2007

)

-

Volume of water value reported to clean a pipe section of 150 m long. Relevant parameters as pipe slope and particle 

diameter are not considered.

Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani 

(

2013

)

0.21

Good approximation. Experimental model (Equation (3)) obtained with a constant flume slope of 0.001.

EPR-MOGA Equation 

(10)

0.4–1.25

Good performance for predicting the removal rate during flushing waves operation. Model consider relevant parameters as 

the mean particle diameter and the pipe geometry.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

11

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

and Modica 

2008

; Yang et al. 

2019

). However, since the model 

only considers transport as bedload, some fine particles may be 
eroded and transported in suspension (which has been identi-
fied  as  one  of  the  major  sources  of  pollution  in  CSO  (Laplace 
et al. 

2003

; Saul et al. 

2003

)), due to the high turbulence of the 

flow.  This  is  particularly  important  in  well-graded  materials 
where wide ranges of mean particle sizes are present.

Even  though  the  new  model  was  developed  considering 

a  wide  range  of  variations  in  input  variables,  some  limitations 
exist.  The  granular  material  used  in  the  experiments  cannot 
represent  the  cohesive  properties  of  sediments  found  in  real 
sewer  systems.  As  a  result,  an  increased  bed  resistance  to 
erosion  can  be  seen  in  practice  (Campisano  et  al. 

2019

).  In 

addition,  the  lowest  pipe  slope  value  considered  during  the 
tests  was  0.644%,  which  is  higher  than  the  minimum  self- 
cleansing  value  recommended  in  several  industry  design 
codes and water utilities design manuals (e.g. Health Research 
Inc (

2004

), as quoted by Montes et al. (

2019

)).

5. Conclusions

This  study  proposes  a  simple  model  to  predict  the  sediment 
transport rate in practice based on data collected from a set of 
121 lab experiments conducted on a 209 mm diameter acrylic 
pipe  and  595  mm  diameter  PVC  pipe.  The  data  collected  this 
way  were  processed  using  the  EPR-MOGA  modelling  techni-
que. A new model for predicting the sediment velocity during 
flushing  operation  was  developed  and  used  for  constructing 
design  charts.  Based  on  the  results  obtained,  the  following 
conclusions are made:

(1) The new model developed and presented here can pre-

dict  the  sediment  transport  rate  during  flushing  dis-
charges  accurately  in  practice.  This  model  includes  the 
group  of  parameters  that  most  affect  the  flushing  effi-
ciency in sewer pipes.

(2) The  sediment  transport  rate  is  principally  affected  by 

four parameters: pipe slope, pipe diameter, particle dia-
meter  and  discharged  peak  flow.  In  pipes  with  large 
diameters  and  slopes,  the  flushing  is  more  effective. 
This  is  because  of  the  high  regression  exponents  for 
both 

S

o

SG 1

ð

Þ

and  d=R variables  obtained  in  the  EPR- 

MOGA  model  presented  here.  The  sediment  transport 
is not significantly affected by the value of the deposited 
sediment thickness.

(3) The  new  model  proposed  outperforms  the  simplified 

models and methods reported in the literature in terms 
of removal sediment rate prediction. This is seen by the 
better  prediction  accuracy  shown  when  compared  to 
the case study reported by Laplace et al. (

2003

).

(4) Existing models such as Bong, Lau, and Ab Ghani (

2013

and  Dettmar  (

2007

)  for  predicting  sediment  transport 

tend  to  underestimate  the  total  volume  of  water 
required  to  clean  a  deposited  sediment  bed.  The  EPR- 
MOGA  model  is  more  accurate  in  predicting  the  sedi-
ment  transport  rate  as  this  model  includes  parameters 
affecting the flushing efficiency, such as flushing hydrau-
lics, pipe geometry and sediment properties.

Based on the conclusions mentioned above, the new flush-

ing model can be useful for designing flushing schemes during 
the  operational  stage  of  existing  sewer  pipes  in  engineering 
practice.  Further  research  is  recommended  to  test  the  model 
proposed  in  real  sewer  pipes  under  different  sediment  (i.e. 
cohesive materials) and hydraulic conditions.

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank Professor Orazio Giustolisi who developed 
and  made  available  for  free  the  EPR-MOGA  XL  software  used  in  this 
research.

Disclosure statement

No potential conflict of interest was reported by the author(s).

ORCID

Carlos Montes 

http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0758-4697

Sergio Vanegas 

http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5786-9450

Zoran Kapelan 

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0934-4470

Luigi Berardi 

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6252-2467

Juan Saldarriaga 

http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1265-2949

References

Ab Ghani, A., and H. Azamathulla. 

2011

. “Gene-Expression Programming for 

Sediment Transport in Sewer Pipe Systems.” Journal  of  Pipeline  Systems 
Engineering  and  Practice  
2  (3):  102–106.  doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)PS.1949- 

1204.0000076

.

Ashley,  R.,  J.  Bertrand-Krajewski,  T.  Hvitved-Jacobsen,  and  M.  Verbanck. 

2004

Solids  in  Sewers:  Characteristics,  Effects  and  Control  of  Sewer  Solids 

and  Associated  Pollutants.  London:  IWA  Publishing.  doi:

10.2166/ 

9781780402727

.

ASTM  D854-14. 

2014

.  Standard  Test  Methods  for  Specific  Gravity  of  Soil 

Solids  by  Water  Pycnometer.  West  Conshohocken,  PA:  ASTM 
International.

Bajirao, T., P. Kumar, M. Kumar, A. Elbeltagi, and A. Kuriqi. 

2021

. “Superiority 

of  Hybrid  Soft  Computing  Models  in  Daily  Suspended  Sediment 
Estimation  in  Highly  Dynamic  Rivers.”  Sustainability  13  (2):  542. 
doi:

10.3390/su13020542

.

Bertrand-Krajewski, J., J. Bardin, C. Gibello, and D. Laplace. 

2003

. “Hydraulics 

of a Sewer Flushing Gate.” Water Science and Technology 47 (4): 129–136. 
doi:

10.2166/wst.2003.0237

.

Bong,  C.,  T.  Lau,  and  A.  Ab  Ghani. 

2013

.  “Hydraulics  Characteristics  of 

Tipping  Sediment  Flushing  Gate.”  Water  Science  and  Technology 
68 (11): 2397–2406. doi:

10.2166/wst.2013.498

.

Bong,  C.,  T.  Lau,  and  A.  Ab  Ghani. 

2016

.  “Potential  of  Tipping  Flush 

Gate  for  Sedimentation  Management  in  Open  Stormwater  Sewer.” 
Urban 

Water 

Journal 

13 

(5): 

486–498. 

doi:

10.1080/ 

1573062X.2014.994002

.

Campisano,  A.,  and  C.  Modica. 

2003

.  “Flow  Velocities  and  Shear  Stresses 

during  Flushing  Operations  in  Sewer  Collectors.”  Water  Science  and 
Technology  
47 (4): 123–128. doi:

10.2166/wst.2003.0236

.

Campisano, A., C. Modica, E. Creaco, and G. Shahsavari. 

2019

. “A Model for 

Non-uniform  Sediment  Transport  Induced  by  Flushing  in  Sewer 
Channels.” 

Water 

Research 

163: 

114903. 

doi:

10.1016/j. 

watres.2019.114903

.

Campisano,  A.,  E.  Creaco,  and  C.  Modica. 

2004

.  “Experimental  and 

Numerical  Analysis  of  the  Scouring  Effects  of  Flushing  Waves  on 
Sediment  Deposits.”  Journal  of  Hydrology  299  (3–4):  324–334. 
doi:

10.1016/j.jhydrol.2004.08.009

.

Campisano, A., E. Creaco, and C. Modica. 

2006

. “Experimental Analysis of the 

Hydrass  Flushing  Gate  and  Laboratory  Validation  of  Flush  Propagation 

12

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

Modelling.”  Water  Science  and  Technology  54  (6–7):  101–108. 
doi:

10.2166/wst.2006.608

.

Campisano, A., E. Creaco, and C. Modica. 

2007

. “Dimensionless Approach for 

the  Design  of  Flushing  Gates  in  Sewer  Channels.”  Journal  of  Hydraulic 
Engineering  
133  (8):  964–972.  doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2007) 

133:8(964)

.

Campisano, A., E. Creaco, and C. Modica. 

2008

. “Laboratory Investigation on 

the Effects of Flushes on Cohesive Sediment Beds.” Urban Water Journal 
5 (1): 3–14. doi:

10.1080/15730620701726259

.

Caviedes-Voullième,  D.,  M.  Morales-Hernández,  C.  Juez,  A.  Lacasta,  and 

P.  García-Navarro. 

2017

.  “Two-dimensional  Numerical  Simulation  of 

Bed-load  Transport  of  a  Finite-depth  Sediment  Layer:  Applications  to 
Channel  Flushing.”  Journal  of  Hydraulic  Engineering  143  (9):  04017034. 
doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0001337

.

Chebbo,  G.,  D.  Laplace,  A.  Bachoc,  Y.  Sanchez,  and  B.  Le  Guennec. 

1996

“Technical Solutions Envisaged in Managing Solids in Combined Sewer 
Networks.”  Water  Science  and  Technology  33  (9):  237–244.  doi:

10.1016/ 

0273-1223(96)00392-7

.

Creaco,  E.,  and  J.  Bertrand-Krajewski. 

2009

.  “Numerical  Simulation  of 

Flushing Effect on Sewer Sediments and Comparison of Four Sediment 
Transport  Formulas.”  Journal  of  Hydraulic  Research  47  (2):  195–202. 
doi:

10.3826/jhr.2009.3363

.

De  Sutter,  R.,  M.  Huygens,  and  R.  Verhoeven. 

1999

.  “Unsteady  Flow 

Sediment  Transport  in  a  Sewer  Model.”  Water  Science  and  Technology 
39 (9): 121–128. doi:

10.1016/S0273-1223(99)00224-3

.

Delleur, J. 

2001

. “New Results and Research Needs on Sediment Movement 

in  Urban  Drainage.”  Journal  of  Water  Resources  Planning  and 
Management  
127  (3):  186–193.  doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9496(2001) 

127:3(186)

.

Dettmar,  J. 

2005

.  “Beitrag  zur  Verbesserung  der  Reinigung  von 

Abwasserkanälen.” PhD diss., RWTH Aachen University.

Dettmar,  J. 

2007

.  “A  New  Planning  Procedure  for  Sewer  Flushing.”  Paper 

presented  at  the  NOVATECH  2007  –  Sixth  International  Conference  on 
Sustainable  Techniques  and  Strategies  in  Urban  Water  Management, 
Lyon, June 25–28.

Dettmar,  J.,  B.  Rietsch,  and  U.  Lorenz. 

2002

.  “Performance  and 

Operation  of  Flushing  Devices  -  Results  of  a  Field  and  Laboratory 
Study.”  Global  Solutions  for  Urban  Drainage:  Proceedings  of  the  Ninth 
International  Conference  on  Urban  Drainage  
1–10.  doi:

10.1061/40644-

(2002)291

.

Ebtehaj, I., and H. Bonakdari. 

2016

. “Bed Load Sediment Transport in Sewers 

at  Limit  of  Deposition.”  Scientia  Iranica  23  (3):  907–917.  doi:

10.24200/ 

sci.2016.2169

.

Ebtehaj,  I.,  H.  Bonakdari,  S.  Shamshirband,  Z.  Ismail,  and  R.  Hashim. 

2017

“New  Approach  to  Estimate  Velocity  at  Limit  of  Deposition  in  Storm 
Sewers Using Vector Machine Coupled with Firefly Algorithm.” Journal of 
Pipeline  Systems  Engineering  and  Practice  
8  (2):  04016018.  doi:

10.1061/ 

(ASCE)PS.1949-1204.0000252

.

Fan, C. 

2004

Sewer Sediment and Control A Management Practices Reference 

Guide, EPA/600/R-04/059. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency.

Fan,  C.,  R.  Field,  W.  Pisano,  J.  Barsanti,  J.  Joyce,  and  H.  Sorenson. 

2001

“Sewer  and  Tank  Flushing  for  Sediment,  Corrosion,  and  Pollution 
Control.” Journal  of  Water  Resources  Planning  and  Management  127 (3): 
194–201. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9496(2001)127:3(194)

.

Giustolisi, O., and D. Savic. 

2004

. “A Novel Genetic Programming Strategy: 

Evolutionary Polynomial Regression.” Proceedings of the 6th International 
Conference 

on 

Hydroinformatics 

787–794. 

doi:

10.1142/ 

9789812702838_0097

.

Giustolisi, O., and D. Savic. 

2006

. “A Symbolic Data-driven Technique Based 

on  Evolutionary  Polynomial  Regression.”  Journal  of  Hydroinformatics 
8 (4): 207–222. doi:

10.2166/hydro.2006.020

.

Giustolisi,  O.,  and  D.  Savic. 

2009

.  “Advances  in  Data-driven  Analyses  and 

Modelling  Using  EPR-MOGA.”  Journal  of  Hydroinformatics  11  (3–4): 
225–236. doi:

10.2166/hydro.2009.017

.

Guo, Q., C. Fan, R. Raghaven, and R. Field. 

2004

. “Gate and Vacuum Flushing 

of Sewer Sediment: Laboratory Testing.” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 
130 (5): 463–466. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2004)130:5(463)

.

Health  Research  Inc. 

2004

.  “Recommended  Standards  for  Wastewater 

Facilities.” A  Report of the Wastewater Committee 12224 (518): 1–102.

Khosravi,  K.,  J.  Cooper,  P.  Daggupati,  B.  Thai  Pham,  and  D.  Tien  Bui. 

2020

“Bedload  Transport  Rate  Prediction:  Application  of  Novel  Hybrid  Data 
Mining  Techniques.”  Journal  of  Hydrology  585:  124774.  doi:

10.1016/j. 

jhydrol.2020.124774

.

Kuriqui,  A.,  G.  Koçileri,  and  M.  Ardiçlioğlu. 

2020

.  “Potential  of  Meyer-Peter 

and  Müller  Approach  for  Estimation  of  Bed-load  Sediment  Transport 
under  Different  Hydraulic  Regimes.”  Modeling  Earth  Systems  and 
Environment 
6: 129–137. doi:

10.1007/s40808-019-00665-0

.

Lainé,  S.,  L.  Phan,  D.  Malabat,  and  B.  Duffros. 

1998

.  “Flush  Cleaning  of 

Sewer  Using  the  Hydras-Valve.”  Paper  presented  at  the  4th 
International  Conference  on  Urban  Drainage  Modelling,  London, 
September  21–24.

Laplace,  D.,  C.  Oms,  M.  Ahyerre,  G.  Chebbo,  J.  Lemasson,  and  L.  Felouzis. 

2003

.  “Removal  of  the  Organic  Surface  Layer  in  Combined  Sewer 

Sediment  Using  a Flushing Gate.”  Water  Science  and  Technology  47  (4): 
19–26. doi:

10.2166/wst.2003.0211

.

May,  R.,  J.  Ackers,  D.  Butler,  and  S.  John. 

1996

.  “Development  of  Design 

Methodology  for  Self-cleansing  Sewers.”  Water  Science  and  Technology 
33 (9): 195–205. doi:

10.1016/0273-1223(96)00387-3

.

Montes,  C.,  J.  Bohorquez,  S.  Borda,  and  J.  Saldarriaga. 

2019

.  “Impact  of 

Self-Cleansing  Criteria  Choice  on  the  Optimal  Design  of  Sewer 
Networks  in  South  America.”  Water  (Switzerland)  11  (6):  1148. 
doi:

10.3390/w11061148

.

Montes,  C.,  L.  Berardi,  Z.  Kapelan,  and  J.  Saldarriaga. 

2020a

.  “Predicting 

Bedload  Sediment  Transport  of  Non-cohesive  Material  in  Sewer  Pipes 
Using  Evolutionary  Polynomial  Regression  –  Multi-objective  Genetic 
Algorithm  Strategy.”  Urban  Water  Journal  17  (2):  154–162.  doi:

10.1080/ 

1573062X.2020.1748210

.

Montes,  C.,  S.  Vanegas,  Z.  Kapelan,  L.  Berardi,  and  J.  Saldarriaga. 

2020b

“Non-deposition  Self-cleansing  Models  for  Large  Sewer  Pipes.”  Water 
Science and  Technology 
81 (3): 606–621. doi:

10.2166/wst.2020.154

.

Montes, C., Z. Kapelan, and J. Saldarriaga. 

2021

. “Predicting Non-deposition 

Sediment  Transport  in  Sewer  Pipes  Using  Random  Forest.”  Water 
Research  
189: 116639. doi:

10.1016/j.watres.2020.116639

.

NEIWPCC. 

2003

.  Optimizing  Operation,  Maintenance,  and  Rehabilitation  of 

Sanitary  Sewer  Collection  Systems.  Lowell,  MA:  New  England  Interstate 
Water Pollution Control Commission.

Ristenpart,  E. 

1998

.  “Solids  Transport  by  Flushing  of  Combined  Sewers.” 

Water  Science  and  Technology  37  (1):  171–178.  doi:

10.1016/S0273- 

1223(97)00767-1

.

Rodríguez,  J.,  N.  McIntyre,  M.  Díaz-Granados,  and  Č.  Maksimović. 

2012

“A  Database  and  Model  to  Support  Proactive  Management  of 
Sediment-related  Sewer  Blockages.”  Water  Research  46  (15): 
4571–4586. doi:

10.1016/j.watres.2012.06.037

.

Saegrov,  S. 

2006

.  Computer  Aided  Rehabilitation  of  Sewer  and  Storm  Water 

Networks – CARE-S. IWA Publishing. doi:

10.2166/9781780402390

.

Safari, M. 

2020

. “Hybridization of Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines 

and  Random  Forest  Models  with  an  Empirical  Equation  for  Sediment 
Deposition Prediction in Open Channel Flow.” Journal of Hydrology 590: 
125392. doi:

10.1016/j.jhydrol.2020.125392

.

Safari, M., M. Mohammadi, and A. Ab Ghani. 

2018

. “Experimental Studies of 

Self-cleansing  Drainage  System  Design:  A  Review.”  Journal  of  Pipeline 
Systems  Engineering  and  Practice  
9  (4):  04018017.  doi:

10.1061/(ASCE) 

PS.1949-1204.0000335

.

Sakakibara,  T. 

1996

.  “Sediments  Flushing  Experiment  in  a  Trunk  Sewer.” 

Water  Science  and  Technology  33  (9):  229–235.  doi:

10.1016/0273- 

1223(96)00391-5

.

Saul,  A.,  P.  Skipworth,  S.  Tait,  and  P.  Rushforth. 

2003

.  “Movement  of  Total 

Suspended Solids in Combined Sewers.” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 
129 (4): 298–307. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2003)129:4(298)

.

Schaffner,  J.,  and  J.  Steinhardt 

2006

.  “Numerical  Investigation  of  the 

Self-acting  Flushing  System  HydroFlush  GS  in  Frankenberg/Germany.” 
Paper  presented  at  the  2th  Conference  on  Sewer  Operation  and 
Maintenance, Vienna, October.

Shahsavari,  G.,  G.  Arnaud-Fassetta,  and  A.  Campisano. 

2017

.  “A  Field 

Experiment  to  Evaluate  the  Cleaning  Performance  of  Sewer  Flushing 

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

13

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/fae46761c2c9d4c8f4e41f029230dc37/index-html.html
background image

on  Non-uniform  Sediment  Deposits.”  Water  Research  118:  59–69. 
doi:

10.1016/j.watres.2017.04.026

.

Shirazi,  R.,  A.  Campisano,  C.  Modica,  and  P.  Willems. 

2014

.  “Modelling  the 

Erosive  Effects  of  Sewer  Flushing  Using  Different  Sediment  Transport 
Formulae.” Water Science and Technology 69 (6): 1198–1204. doi:

10.2166/ 

wst.2013.810

.

Wan  Mohtar,  W.,  H.  Afan,  A.  El-Shafie,  C.  Bong,  and  A.  Ab  Ghani. 

2018

“Influence of Bed Deposit in the Prediction of Incipient Sediment Motion 

in Sewers Using Artificial Neural Networks.” Urban  Water  Journal  15 (4): 
296–302. doi:

10.1080/1573062X.2018.1455880

.

Yang, H., D. Zhu, Y. Zhang, and Y. Zhou. 

2019

. “Numerical Investigation on 

Bottom  Shear  Stress  Induced  by  Flushing  Gate  for  Sewer  Cleaning.” 
Water Science and Technology 80 (2): 290–299. doi:

10.2166/wst.2019.269

.

Yu,  C.,  and  J.  Duan. 

2014

.  “Two-Dimensional  Finite  Volume  Model  for 

Sediment Transport in Unsteady Flow.” World  Environmental  and  Water 
Resources Congress 
2014: 1432–1441. doi:

10.1061/9780784413548.144

.

14

C. MONTES ET AL.

¿Quiere saber más? Contáctenos

Declaro haber leído y aceptado la Política de Privacidad