Predicting bedload sediment transport of non-cohesive material in sewer pipes using evolutionary polynomial regression – multi-objective genetic algorithm strategy.

Sewer sediments can be defined as any settleable particulate material found in stormwater or wastewater that are able to form bed deposits in pipes and hydraulic structures

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at

https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=nurw20

Urban Water Journal

ISSN: 1573-062X (Print) 1744-9006 (Online) Journal homepage: https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/nurw20

Predicting bedload sediment transport of

non-cohesive material in sewer pipes using

evolutionary polynomial regression – multi-

objective genetic algorithm strategy

Carlos Montes, Luigi Berardi, Zoran Kapelan & Juan Saldarriaga

To cite this article:

 Carlos Montes, Luigi Berardi, Zoran Kapelan & Juan Saldarriaga (2020)

Predicting bedload sediment transport of non-cohesive material in sewer pipes using evolutionary

polynomial regression – multi-objective genetic algorithm strategy, Urban Water Journal, 17:2,

154-162, DOI: 10.1080/1573062X.2020.1748210
To link to this article:  https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2020.1748210

© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa

UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis

Group.

Published online: 08 Apr 2020.

Submit your article to this journal 

Article views: 1195

View related articles 

View Crossmark data

Citing articles: 12 View citing articles 

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Predicting bedload sediment transport of non-cohesive material in sewer pipes using
evolutionary polynomial regression

– multi-objective genetic algorithm strategy

Carlos Montes

a

, Luigi Berardi

b

, Zoran Kapelan

c

and Juan Saldarriaga

a

a

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia;

b

Department of Engineering and Geology,

Università degli Studi

“G. d’Annunzio” Chieti, Pescara, Italy;

c

Department of Water Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands

ABSTRACT

Sediment transport in sewer systems is an important issue of interest to engineering practice. Several
models have been developed in the past to predict a threshold velocity or shear stress resulting in self-
cleansing

flow conditions in a sewer pipe. These models, however, could still be improved. This paper

develops three new self-cleansing models using the Evolutionary Polynomial Regression-Multi-Objective
Genetic Algorithm (EPR-MOGA) methodology applied to new experimental data collected on a 242 mm
diameter acrylic pipe. The three new models are validated and compared to the literature models using
both new and previously published data sets. The results obtained demonstrate that three new models
have improved prediction accuracy when compared to the literature ones. The key feature of the new
models is the inclusion of pipe slope as a signi

ficant explanatory factor in estimating the threshold self-

cleansing velocity.

ARTICLE HISTORY

Received 19 November 2019
Accepted 24 March 2020

KEYWORDS

Bedload; EPR-MOGA; non-
cohesive sediment transport;
sediment transport; self-
cleansing sewer pipes

Introduction

Sewer sediments can be de

fined as any settleable particulate

material found in stormwater or wastewater that are able to
form bed deposits in pipes and hydraulic structures (Ackers et
al.

2001

; Butler and Davies

2011

). These solids contain a wide

range of very small to large particles, i.e. ranging from clays
with a mean diameter of 0.0001 to 60 mm gravels (Bertrand-
Krajewski, Luc, and Scrivener

1993

; Ashley et al.

2004

) and may

originate from a variety of sources, such as large fecal and
organic matter, atmospheric fall-out and grit from abrasion of
road surface, among others (Butler and Davies

2011

). These

particles move in the drainage catchment during storm events
and, eventually, enter into the system.

The movement of particles in sewer pipes embodies the

processes of erosion, entrainment, transportation, deposition,
and compaction (Vanoni

2006

). Each of these phases depends

on the water velocity magnitude. For example, deposition
begins when water velocity is low, erosion occurs for higher
velocities and transportation for even higher velocities
(Alvarez-Hernandez

1990

). The movement of these particles

inside sewers depends on several parameters, such as sediment
concentration, mean particle size, the speci

fic gravity of sedi-

ments (Ackers et al.

2001

; Butler, May, and Ackers

2003

), and

flow-hydraulics (Merritt

2009

).

Sediment transport in sewer systems has traditionally been

an important issue in hydraulic engineering. During dry
weather seasons, the risk of sedimentation in sewer pipes
increases, and a permanent deposit of particles in the sewer
may produce changes in the pipes such as the consolidation
and cementation of sediments (Ebtehaj and Bonakdari

2013

).

As a related problem in this

field, these variations may also alter

the hydraulic roughness of the pipes, resulting in an increase of

the

flow resistance, blockage, flooding, surcharge and a pre-

mature over

flow operation, among others (Ab Ghani

1993

;

Ashley

and

Verbanck

1996

;

Mays

2001

;

Bizier

2007

;

Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

). To avoid

these problems, minimum velocity and minimum shear stress
values have been proposed in di

fferent design manuals. As an

example, a minimum self-cleansing velocity of 0.6 m s

−1

is

highly used in the United States (ASCE

1970

) and France

(Minister of Interior

1977

), and, according to Montes, Kapelan,

and Saldarriaga (

2019

), minimum shear stress values between

1.0 and 4.0 Pa are recommended in several water utilities
design manuals in the United States, Europe and South
America.

Previous traditional self-cleansing criteria may be unsuitable

if there are variations in particle diameter and sediment con-
centration (Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

).

Based on the aforementioned, several experimental investiga-
tions have studied the movement of particles to determine a
critical velocity to prevent sedimentation and particle deposi-
tion in sewers. These studies have developed self-cleansing
equations to predict a minimum velocity or shear stress values,
such as a function of several combination of parameters, e.g.
mean particle diameter, volumetric sediment concentration
and hydraulic radius, amongst others parameters. According
to Safari, Mohammadi, and Ghani (

2018

), these self-cleansing

criteria studies can be classi

fied into two major groups: bed

sediment motion and non-deposition.

Bed sediment motion is a criterion used to calculate the

flow

conditions required to move deposited material at the bottom
of the sewer pipes, i.e. a permanent accumulated material
during low-

flow rates. In this group, minimum velocity or mini-

mum shear stress values are required to allow the initiation of

CONTACT

Juan Saldarriaga

jsaldarr@uniandes.edu.co

URBAN WATER JOURNAL
2020, VOL. 17, NO. 2, 154

–162

https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2020.1748210

© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

),

which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, and is not altered, transformed, or built upon in any way.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

sediment motion (i.e. incipient motion criterion) or scouring of
existing sediment bed (i.e. scouring criterion) (Vongvisessomjai,
Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

; Safari et al.

2017

; Safari,

Mohammadi, and Ghani

2018

). Several studies in this group

can be found in the literature of incipient motion (Novak and
Nalluri

1975

,

1984

; Ab Ghani et al.

1999

) and scouring (Camp

1946

). A full review of bed sediment motion studies has been

prepared by Safari, Mohammadi, and Ghani (

2018

).

In contrast, in the second group, non-deposition criterion,

minimum velocity values are required to prevent a permanent
deposit of particles at the bottom of the pipes, i.e. avoiding a
permanent accumulated material during low-

flow rates. This

group can be divided into three sub-groups: non-deposition
without deposited bed (i.e. sediment movement without form-
ing a stationary deposited bed), non-deposition with deposited
bed (i.e. sediment movement forming a stationary deposited
bed but limiting to a certain proportion of the pipe diameter
(May et al.

1989

)) and incipient deposition (i.e. changing from

suspended to bedload transport) (Safari et al.

2017

). Each of

these sub-groups considers di

fferent sediment dynamics and

represents the self-cleansing criteria such as a function of a
particular combination of parameters. As an example, in the
non-deposition transport without deposited bed, all the mate-
rial should be transported in

flume traction along the bottom of

the pipe (Mayerle

1988

; Butler, May, and Ackers

1996

). For the

non-deposition with deposited bed, a depth of sediment is
allowed in the pipe, to increase the transport capacity (El-
Zaemey

1991

; Ab Ghani

1993

; May

1993

; Butler, May, and

Ackers

1996

; May et al.

1996

). Finally, the incipient deposition

criterion is de

fined as the limit where particles in suspension

are deposited at the bottom of the pipes and begin to move
such bedload (Butler, May, and Ackers

1996

; Safari, Aksoy, and

Mohammadi

2015

).

In this paper, the non-deposition without deposited bed

criterion is studied, which is a conservative criterion useful to
the design of self-cleansing sewer pipes, according to Butler,
May, and Ackers (

2003

), Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and

Babel (

2010

) and Safari, Mohammadi, and Ghani (

2018

). To

apply this criterion, it is necessary to identify several parameters
such as size, concentration and density of the sediments
(Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

) and the

mode of transport of the particles inside the pipes, i.e. bedload
or suspended load transport. For bedload transport, several
authors have developed equations to calculate a minimum
self-cleansing velocity to prevent the deposition of particles at
the bottom of the pipes. These equations have been developed
using experimental approaches and data handling. Craven
(

1953

) studied the transport of sands in 152 mm diameter

pipe, using three quartz sands of 0.25 mm, 0.58 mm and
1.62 mm. Robinson and Graf (

1972

) conducted experiments

using 102 mm and 152 mm diameter pipes, varying the mate-
rial concentration and the pipe slope. Novak and Nalluri (

1975

)

evaluated the bedload transport in a 152 mm diameter pipe,
using sand and gravel with mean diameters between 0.6 mm
and 50 mm. Mayerle (

1988

) conducted a series of experiments

for non-deposition without deposited bed, using a circular
channel of 152 mm diameter and a rectangular channel variat-
ing the particle diameter between 0.5 and 5.22 mm. May et al.
(

1989

) carried out experiments in a 300 mm diameter concrete

pipe moving sediments, with a mean particle diameter of
0.72 mm and developed a guideline for the design of self-
cleansing sewers. Other authors (El-Zaemey

1991

; Mayerle,

Nalluri, and Novak

1991

; Perrusquía

1991

; Ab Ghani

1993

; Ota

1999

; Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

) studied

the sediment transport of non-cohesive material such as bed-
load movement using several mean particle sizes, pipe dia-
meters, and material concentrations under uniform

flow

conditions.

For suspended load transport, Pulliah (

1978

) carried out 21

experiments, using three uniform particles of 0.027 mm,
0.018 mm and 0.006 mm and varying the volumetric concen-
tration between 170 ppm and 48,542 ppm. Macke (

1982

) stu-

died the suspended load transport in three pipes of 192 mm,
290 mm and 445 mm diameters, and estimated an equation
that provides a good

fit for suspended load particles (Ackers et

al.

2001

). Macke

’s equation has been proposed for self-cleans-

ing sewer systems design (May et al.

1996

; Ackers et al.

2001

).

Arora (

1983

) used three uniform sands of 0.147 mm, 0.106 mm

and 0.082 mm, varying the material concentration from 35 ppm
to 6,562 ppm. Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel (

2010

)

studied the suspended load transport, using sands with a par-
ticle diameter of 0.2 mm and 0.3 mm and varying the sediment
concentration between 113 ppm and 1,374 ppm.

In this context, Ackers, Butler, and May (

1996

) evaluated the

performance of several self-cleansing equations proposed by
di

fferent authors (Macke

1982

; Mayerle

1988

; May et al.

1989

;

Ab Ghani

1993

; Nalluri, Ghani, and El-Zaemey

1994

; Nalluri and

Ghani

1996

) and proposed three formulas for design sewers

under three typical sediment conditions, i.e. suspended load,
bedload and cohesive sediment erosion. In their study, they
concluded that for bedload transport, the May et al. (

1996

)

equation should be used to design future self-cleansing sewer
systems. Recent studies have collected and used existing
experimental data (Mayerle

1988

; May et al.

1989

; May

1993

;

Ota

1999

; Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

) to

develop new self-cleansing equations, using Adaptive Neuro-
Fuzzy Inference System (Azamathulla, Ghani, and Fei

2012

),

Arti

ficial Neuronal Network (Ebtehaj and Bonakdari

2013

),

non-linear regression and the digital analysis in MINITAB
(Ebtehaj, Bonakdari, and Shari

2014

), Group Method of Data

Handling (Ebtehaj and Bonakdari

2016

), Model Tree and

Evolutionary Polynomial Regression (Najafzadeh, Laucelli, and
Zahiri

2017

) and Evolutionary Polynomial Regression Multi-

Objective Genetic Algorithm (EPR-MOGA) tool (Montes et al.

2018

), amongst other approaches.

Usually, the self-cleansing models found in the literature

have been developed as a function of the modi

fied Froude

number (F

R

*):

F

R

¼

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

 1

ð

Þ

p

(1)

This parameter allows the estimation of the minimum self-
cleansing velocity (v

l

), using the gravitational acceleration coef-

ficient (g), the mean particle diameter (d) and the specific
gravity of sediments (SG). The di

fferences with traditional self-

cleansing models are the number of parameters required to
estimate v

l

, and the exponents and coe

fficients of each

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

155

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

equation.

Table 1

presents a review of typical equations used

on sediment transport as bedload, where C

v

is the volumetric

sediment concentration; y the water level; R the hydraulic
radius;

λ the channel friction factor; D the pipe diameter; A

the cross-section area; v

t

the velocity of sediment incipient

motion, de

fined as (Novak and Nalluri

1975

):

v

t

¼ 0:61 g SG  1

ð

ÞR

½

0

:5

R
d

 

0:23

(2)

D

gr

the dimensionless grain size:

D

gr

¼

SG

 1

ð

Þgd

3

#

2

1
3

(3)

β a cross-section shape factor and υ the water kinematic
viscosity.

Each experimental study mentioned above has been carried

out under uniform, steady

flow conditions, and using a specific

hydraulic conditions and particle characteristics. This means
that the self-cleansing equations could be over

fitting certain

datasets resulting in poor performance when applied to other
datasets. As an example, Safari, Mohammadi, and Ghani (

2018

)

showed that the Mayerle, Nalluri, and Novak (

1991

)

’s model has

acceptable performance with the Mayerle (

1988

) data, but it

gives poor results when this equation is used with other data-
sets (May

1982

,

1993

; Ab Ghani

1993

; Vongvisessomjai,

Tingsanchali, and Babel

2010

).

The cohesive properties of sewer sediments have not been

considered in the above-mentioned studies. Higher velocities
are required to move the cohesive material in the deposited
bed (Butler, May, and Ackers

1996

); however, according to

Alvarez-Hernandez (

1990

), who studied the cohesive e

ffects

on sewer sediments using Laponite clay gel and granular
sand, when the threshold of movement is exceeded, cohesive
sediments lose their cohesive properties and move as granular
material. Based on the above, May et al. (

1996

) suggest that the

transport equations developed under well-controlled labora-
tory conditions can be applied to real sewer systems, where
in sewer sediments present cohesive properties.

This paper proposes three new models for predicting self-

cleansing

flow conditions for bedload sediment transport in

sewer pipes for uniformly graded and non-cohesive sediments.

The aim is to improve the prediction accuracy of existing
methods. Evolutionary Polynomial Regression Multi-Objective
Genetic Algorithm methodology (EPR-MOGA) (Giustolisi and
Savic

2009

) implemented in the EPR-MOGA-XL tool (Laucelli

et al.

2012

) is used to develop these predictive self-cleansing

models.

The rest of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2

presents the experimental setup and data collection. Section
3 contains the model development. In section 4 the model
validation is presented. Finally, conclusions are presented in
section 5.

Experimental data

The experimental work is carried out on a 242 mm diameter
acrylic pipe located at the Universidad de los Andes, Colombia.
This pipe has a length of 11.8 m and is supported on a steel
truss, which is sustained on

five hydraulic jacks. These jacks

allow varying the pipe slope (S

o

) between

−1.5% and 1.6%.

Figure 1

shows the general scheme of the experimental

apparatus.

A submersible pump (10 HP, 60 Hz, 440 V) is used to supply

water to the apparatus. This pump takes water from a 3.5 m

3

tank downstream of the pipe and conducts it through a PVC
pipe upstream. An ABB-Electromagnetic

flowmeter sensor is

installed on this pipe. Flows ranged from 0.82 L s

−1

to 25.93 L

s

−1

were simulated. These

flows are obtained using a variable

frequency drive, which controls the rotation velocity of the
submersible pump motor. Complementarily, the water depth
is measured using two ultrasonic level sensors (see

Figure 1

).

Water velocity is measured with a Greyline Area-Velocity
Flowmeter Doppler E

ffect sensor, model AVFM 5.0. A sediment

feeder controlled by a valve is used to supply the granular
material to the system with particles having a mean diameter
of 0.35 mm and 1.51 mm. The mean particle diameter is calcu-
lated developing a particle size distribution curve, which is
useful to check the uniformity of the sediments. Both sands
showed a poorly graded material (Uniformity Coe

fficient of 2.0

and 1.3, respectively), i.e. well uniformly graded material, as
shown in

Figure 2

. Particle density and speci

fic gravity are

determined by pycnometer method-procedure (Bong

2013

),

according to ASTM D854-10 (ASTM D854-14

2014

). Sediment

Table 1.

Traditional self-cleansing models used to evaluate the bedload sediment transport in sewer pipes.

Self-cleansing models

Reference

d (mm)

D (mm)

Equation

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 6:37C

v

1

=3 d

D

 

0:5

Craven (

1953

)

0.25

–1.65

152

(4)

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 4:32C

v

0

:23 d

R

 

0:68

Mayerle (

1988

)

0.50

–5.22

152

(5)

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 3:08D

gr

0:09

C

v

0

:21 d

R

 

0:53

λ

0:21

Ab Ghani (

1993

)

0.46

–8.30

154, 305 and 450

(6)

C

v

¼ 0:0303

D

2

A

 

d
D

 

0

:6

1

v

t

v

l

h

i

4

v

l

2

gD SG

1

ð

Þ

h

i

1

:5

May et al. (

1996

)

0.16

–8.30

77

–450

(7)

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 4:31C

v

0

:226 d

R

 

0:616

Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel (

2010

)

0.20

–0.40

100

–150

(8)

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 4:49C

v

0

:21 d

R

 

0:54

Ebtehaj, Bonakdari, and Shari

fi (

2014

)

Ab Ghani (

1993

) and Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali,

and Babel (

2010

) data

(9)

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 0:404

R
d

 

0

:5

þ 23:25

R
d

 

0

:5

C

v

0

:5

Najafzadeh, Laucelli, and Zahiri (

2017

)

Ab Ghani (

1993

) data

(10)

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 7:34C

v

0

:13

D

gr

0:12 d

R

 

0:44

β

0:91

Safari et al. (

2017

)

0.15

–0.83

Trapezoidal channel

(11)

156

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

supply rate is estimated weighting the amount of material
supplied by the sediment feeder, during the time of the experi-
ment (Ota

1999

).

The sediment transport as bedload in the acrylic pipe is

evaluated under steady uniform

flow conditions. The step-by-

step methodology employed to obtain steady uniform

flow

conditions is as follows. Firstly, the variable frequency drive is
programmed for a speci

fic frequency of operation, and the

water

flow is measured. Secondly, the water level is monitored,

using the two ultrasonic sensors. According to Ab Ghani (

1993

),

when the water level di

fference is less than ± 2 mm, the steady

uniform

flow conditions are obtained. This criterion is evalu-

ated experimentally, and the di

fferences obtained between the

energy gradient line, the water surface slope and the pipe slope
are less than 2.0%. Thirdly, if the previous criterion is unsatis-
fied, the flow in the pipe is controlled using the downstream
gate, which is opened or closed until the steady uniform

flow

conditions are obtained. Fourthly, sediments are supplied to
the system at an increasing rate until deposition occurs. This
condition is achieved by varying the opening area of the sedi-
ment feeder valve and weighing the amount of material during
the experiment. Fifthly, the supplied rate is reduced manually,
using the sediment feeder, until the non-deposition condition

occurs. Finally, this condition is kept for at least 15 min and the
water

flow level, the water flow rate, the water velocity and the

rate of sediment are collected. The above experimental proce-
dure is repeated for di

fferent water flow rates and pipe slopes.

A set of 44 experiments were conducted using the above

procedure. The data collected this way were used to derive new
self-cleansing models (33 experiments) and the remaining data
(11 experiments) were used to validate these models.
Experimental data collected for bedload transport are shown
in

Table 2

.

In addition to the previous data collected experimentally,

four datasets found in the literature have been used to validate
the new models proposed in this study.

Table 3

presents the

characteristics of the data collected. These datasets have a
typical range of variation of conditions commonly found in
real sewer systems, according to Ackers et al. (

2001

).

EPR-MOGA-based model development

Evolutionary Polynomial Regression (EPR) is a hybrid regression
model (Giustolisi and Savic

2004

,

2006

) which combines

Genetic Algorithm, for searching exponents in a symbolic for-
mula, with a regression approach, for parameter estimation on
final models (Giustolisi and Savic

2006

,

2009

). In its original

version, the EPR strategy uses a single-objective genetic algo-
rithm (SOGA) for exploring the space of solution (Giustolisi and
Savic

2009

). Later on (Giustolisi and Savic

2009

) the use of

multi-objective optimization strategy based on genetic algo-
rithm (MOGA) allowed to improve the exploration of the space
of symbolic formulas, providing also few alternative models
which could be suited for di

fferent modelling purposes.

The EPR-MOGA strategy allows pseudo-polynomial expres-

sions such as (Giustolisi and Savic

2009

):

bY ¼ a

0

þ

X

m

j¼1

a

j

X

1

ð Þ

ES j;1

ð Þ

: . . . :ðX

k

Þ

ES j;k

ð Þ

:f ðX

1

Þ

ES j;kþ1

ð

Þ

i: . . . :f ðX

k

Þ

ES j;2k

ð

Þ

(12)

Figure 1.

Experimental apparatus used to collect bedload sediment transport data.

0

20

40

60

80

100

0.1

1

10

)

%(

re

ni

F

e

ga

t

ne

cr

e

P

Particle Size (mm)

d50 = 1.51 mm

d50 = 0.35 mm

d50 = 1.51 mm
d60 = 1.58 mm
d10 = 1.23 mm

d50 = 0.35 mm
d60 = 0.39 mm
d10 = 0.19 mm
CU = 2.0

Figure 2.

Grading curve of material used on experimental setup.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

157

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

where b

Y is the vector of model predictions or estimated depen-

dent variable (El-Baroudy et al.

2010

); a

o

the optional bias term;

a

j

the parameters which are estimated through numerical

regression; X

1

. . . X

k

the matrix of the k candidate explanatory

variables; ES the matrix of candidate exponents; f the inner
function selected by the user and m is the maximum number
of additive terms. Full details can be seen in (Giustolisi and
Savic

2006

).

Multi-objective genetic algorithm in EPR-MOGA strategy

explores the space of solutions pursuing two or three objec-
tives simultaneously (Giustolisi and Savic

2009

): maximization

of the model accuracy, i.e. minimization of the Sum of Squared
Errors (as shown in Equation (16)), and minimization of com-
plexity of

final formula in Equation (12), i.e. the number of

pseudo-polynomial additional terms j, the number of inputs
X

k

or both. Using this multi-objective strategy, it is possible to

obtain parsimonious model structures with high

fitting levels.

Recently, Laucelli et al. (

2012

) implemented the EPR-MOGA

strategy as an add-in tool in MS-Excel called EPR-MOGA-XL,
which was used in this work.

To develop new self-cleansing models for sewers three opti-

mization strategies (OS) are used here. Each OS considers a
di

fferent potential group of input parameters to describe the

modi

fied Froude number, as shown in

Table 4

.

Each OS is implemented using the EPR-MOGA-XL and taking

into account several considerations. In this paper, the expression
structure considered is the Case 2 (as shown in Equation (12)),
reported by Giustolisi and Savic (

2006

) with no function f; the

range of exponent values with a step of 0.02 ES = [

−0.60, −0.58,

−0.56, . . ., 0.16] and a maximum number of polynomial terms m
equals to one. In addition, the regression method considered is
Least Squares (Giustolisi and Savic

2006

). Finally, the optimiza-

tion strategy considered aims to minimizing the number of
inputs in the

final formula (i.e. X

i

) in the pseudo-polynomial

structure and the Sum of Squared Error. Such settings allowed
to have a large search space, based on 39 candidate exponents
ES, while seeking for a compact monomial formulas readily
interpretable from hydraulic standpoint.

The models obtained by EPR-MOGA-XL are shown in

Table 5

,

which presents the best

fitting to training data shown in

Table 2

. As shown in

Table 5

, Models (13), (14) and (15) have a

structure that considers the parameters that most a

ffect the

prediction for sediment transport (Nalluri, Ghani, and El-
Zaemey

1994

; May et al.

1996

; Ebtehaj and Bonakdari

2016

),

such as the volumetric sediment concentration, mean particle
diameter, speci

fic gravity of particles and hydraulics radius.

Nevertheless, models (14) and (15) include the pipe slope,

Table 2.

Bedload experiments in the 242 mm acrylic pipe.

Experiment

Model develop-

ment stage

d

(mm)

S

o

(m

m

−1

)

C

v

(ppm)

R

(mm)

F

R

*

v

l

(m

s

−1

)

1

Training

1.510 0.0080

13.0 15.31 1.54

0.24

2

Training

1.510 0.0020

13.2 63.20 3.61

0.56

3

Training

0.351 0.0080

0.5 64.89 5.86

0.46

4

Training

1.510 0.0060

176.8 55.17 5.48

0.85

5

Training

1.510 0.0060

109.7 51.12 5.21

0.81

6

Training

1.510 0.0070

160.2 51.33 5.79

0.90

7

Training

1.510 0.0060

139.0 46.08 4.96

0.77

8

Training

1.510 0.0020

3.2 65.50 3.31

0.52

9

Training

1.510 0.0050

4.0 60.91 2.89

0.45

10

Training

1.510 0.0050

101.2 52.38 5.25

0.82

11

Training

0.351 0.0025

2.2 70.27 6.75

0.53

12

Training

1.510 0.0050

70.1 52.65 5.21

0.81

13

Training

1.510 0.0050

81.1 42.78 4.45

0.69

14

Training

1.510 0.0050

103.1 42.69 4.37

0.68

15

Training

1.510 0.0070

67.3 25.69 3.41

0.53

16

Training

1.510 0.0050

87.0 55.51 5.27

0.82

17

Training

1.510 0.0050

94.0 47.36 4.80

0.75

18

Training

1.510 0.0050

33.4 19.97 2.77

0.43

19

Training

1.510 0.0050

82.8 52.10 5.08

0.79

20

Training

0.351 0.0025

41.4 59.95 9.81

0.77

21

Training

1.510 0.0020

9.8 70.47 3.48

0.54

22

Training

1.510 0.0080

632.3 34.72 5.79

0.90

23

Training

1.510 0.0020

6.4 58.90 2.95

0.46

24

Training

1.510 0.0050

128.9 39.40 4.18

0.65

25

Training

0.351 0.0050

10.1 47.60 7.90

0.62

26

Training

1.510 0.0030

44.7 66.13 4.48

0.70

27

Training

1.510 0.0050

51.3 30.03 3.76

0.59

28

Training

1.510 0.0060

80.6 54.24 5.34

0.83

29

Training

1.510 0.0070

226.4 55.57 6.11

0.95

30

Training

0.351 0.0050

12.1 49.08 8.28

0.65

31

Training

1.510 0.0050

104.8 46.28 4.63

0.72

32

Training

1.510 0.0060

94.2 27.61 3.73

0.58

33

Training

1.510 0.0050

62.5 26.76 3.60

0.56

34

Testing

1.510 0.0070

424.4 43.86 5.60

0.87

35

Testing

1.510 0.0030

24.4 59.83 4.28

0.67

36

Testing

1.510 0.0060

87.6 50.15 5.08

0.79

37

Testing

1.510 0.0030

21.1 57.74 3.99

0.62

38

Testing

0.351 0.0050

20.5 53.97 9.04

0.71

39

Testing

0.351 0.0050

1.8 23.89 3.82

0.30

40

Testing

1.510 0.0050

70.9 38.69 3.99

0.62

41

Testing

1.510 0.0060

100.1 40.23 4.18

0.65

42

Testing

1.510 0.0080

715.0 41.41 6.76

1.05

43

Testing

1.510 0.0050

103.5 44.75 4.67

0.73

44

Testing

1.510 0.0030

32.0 60.51 4.80

0.75

Table 3.

Dataset used to evaluate the performance of self-cleansing models.

Experimental data

Model development stage

No. of runs

D (mm)

d (mm)

S

o

[%]

C

v

(ppm)

v

l

(m s

−1

)

Present study

Training

33

242

0.35

–1.51 0.20–0.80

0.26

–875.62

0.24

–0.95

Present study

Testing

11

242

0.35

–1.51 0.30–0.80

1.77

–715.01

0.30

–1.05

Mayerle (

1988

)

Testing

106

152

0.50

–8.74 0.14–0.56 20.00–1275.00 0.37–1.10

Ab Ghani (

1993

)

Testing

221

154, 305, 450

0.46

–8.30 0.04–2.56

0.76

–1450.00

0.24

–1.22

Ota (

1999

)

Testing

36

305

0.71

–5.61

0.20

4.20

–59.40

0.39

–0.74

Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel (

2010

)

Testing

36

100, 150

0.20

–0.43 0.20–0.60

4.00

–90.00

0.24

–0.63

Table 4.

Optimization strategies adopted to derive new self-cleansing models.

Optimization
strategy

Group of parameters

Parameters

Functional

relationship

1

Hydraulic characteristics

R, A

F

R

* = f(R, A,

λ, C

v

, d)

Pipe material

λ

Sediment characteristics

C

v

, d

2

Hydraulic characteristics

R, A

F

R

* = f(R, A,

λ, D, S

o

,

C

v

, d)

Pipe material

λ

Pipe characteristics

D, S

o

Sediment characteristics

C

v

, d

3

Hydraulic characteristics

R, A

F

R

* = f(R, A,

λ, D, S

o

,

C

v

, d, D

gr

)

Pipe material

λ

Pipe characteristics

D, S

o

Sediment characteristics

C

v

, d, D

gr

158

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

which increases the model accuracy for training and testing
dataset, as shown in

Table 6

.

In addition, the symbolic expressions returned by EPR-

MOGA enable direct comparison with existing models. In
more detail, selected explaining variables and relevant expo-
nents allow to validate each single model based on the con-
sistency with technical insight on the phenomenon, thus
promoting the general validity of selected models outside the
training data set.

Evaluation of proposed models

Performance measures

To validate the models obtained by EPR-MOGA-XL, the testing
datasets shown in

Table 3

are used. The models proposed are

evaluated using four performance measures (index): Sum of
Squared Errors (SSE), Coe

fficient of Determination (CoD) and

Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). These expressions are
de

fined as follows:

SSE

¼

1
n

X

n

i

¼1

Y

 Y

ð

Þ

2

(16)

CoD

¼ 1 

P

n
i

¼1

Y

 Y

ð

Þ

2

P

n
i

¼1

Y

 Y

m

2

(17)

AIC

¼ n: ln

1
n

X

n

i

¼1

Y

 Y

ð

Þ

2

"

#

þ 2k

l

(18)

where Y and Y* are the calculated and observed data, respec-
tively, n the number of data, Y*

m

the mean of observed data

and k

l

the number of parameters included in the model. The

Sum of Squared Errors measures how well the model predic-
tions (Froude numbers) are close to the corresponding obser-
vations. Smaller values of SSE are better with zero value
denoting a perfect match between predictions and observa-
tions. The Coe

fficient of Determination (CoD) estimates the

fraction (i.e. percentage) of model prediction variation that
can be explained by all model input variables together. The
CoD has a value between 0 and 1 with 1 denoting a perfect
match between model predictions and observations. Finally,
the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) is a measure of trade-o

between the goodness of

fit (i.e. accuracy) and parsimony (i.e.

simplicity) of the model. Generally, the model with the lowest
AIC value is selected as the optimal model. These three perfor-
mance measures were selected here because they are, in addi-
tion to being well known and frequently used, complementary
to each other, i.e. they evaluate di

fferent aspects of model

fitting to observed data.

Self-cleansing model performance comparison

The performance of EPR models and traditional equations is
presented in

Table 6

. As it can be seen from this table, some

traditional models have low correlations with experimental data.
For example, Craven (

1953

) model (Equation (4)) has a CoD value

varying between 0.00 and 0.43, which shows poor performance
of this model applied to all experimental datasets. Another
example is Ab Ghani (

1993

) model (Equation (6)), which presents

better results, CoD = [0.56, 0.95], and high

fitting for the datasets.

Based on the aforementioned, Ab Ghani (

1993

) model consid-

ers

five parameters to predict the modified Froude number:

Volumetric sediment concentration, mean particle diameter,
hydraulic radius, dimensionless grain size, and channel friction
factor. In contrast, Craven (

1953

) considers the volumetric sedi-

ment concentration, mean particle diameter, and pipe diameter, to
predict the modi

fied Froude number. These differences in the

combination of input parameters used can increase or decrease

Table 5.

Models obtained using EPR for di

fferent optimization strategies.

OS

Expression

Equation

1

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 3:35C

v

0

:20 d

R

 

0:60

(13)

2

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 6:20S

o

0

:15

C

0

:13

v

d
R

 

0:50

(14)

3

v

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd SG

1

ð

Þ

p

¼ 5:60S

o

0

:14

C

0

:16

v

D

gR

0

:02 d

R

 

0:58

(15)

Table 6.

Performance of models returned by EPR-MOGA-XL and literature self-cleansing models/equations. Bolded values show best performing models.

Data source

Stage

Performance

measure

Traditional Models

EPR-MOGA models

Eq. (4)

Eq. (5)

Eq. (6)

Eq. (7)

Eq. (8)

Eq. (9)

Eq.

(10)

Eq.

(11)

Eq. (13)

Eq. (14)

Eq. (15)

Present Study

Training SSE

4.25

0.96

1.21

0.46

0.41

0.98

1.65

0.63

0.61

0.12

0.06

CoD

0.00

0.65

0.56

0.83

0.85

0.64

0.40

0.77

0.78

0.96

0.98

AIC

53.72

4.53

16.41

−15.87

−23.24

5.26

22.62

−5.15 −10.32

−62.57

−82.17

Present Study

Testing

SSE

3.56

0.80

0.91

0.40

0.28

0.88

1.75

0.66

0.55

0.11

0.06

CoD

0.00

0.64

0.59

0.82

0.87

0.60

0.21

0.70

0.75

0.95

0.97

AIC

19.98

3.56

8.98

−0.03

−7.99

4.58

12.15

5.48

−0.50

−16.23

−20.15

Mayerle (

1988

)

Testing

SSE

2.86

0.22

0.46

0.67

0.67

1.23

2.28

0.61

1.09

0.79

0.56

CoD

0.43

0.96

0.91

0.87

0.87

0.76

0.55

0.88

0.78

0.84

0.89

AIC

117.57

−152.47 −72.71

−32.08

−35.74

28.09

93.31

−43.11

15.20

−17.43

−52.24

Ab Ghani (

1993

)

Testing

SSE

2.88

2.55

0.38

0.44

0.32

0.36

0.75

0.84

0.25

0.33

0.18

CoD

0.38

0.45

0.92

0.90

0.93

0.92

0.84

0.82

0.95

0.93

0.96

AIC

239.81

213.22

−202.55 −168.96 −243.61 −221.39 −58.67 −27.49 −300.53 −237.82 −363.39

Ota (

1999

)

Testing

SSE

1.63

0.78

0.09

0.07

0.07

0.13

0.26

0.09

0.07

0.04

0.04

CoD

0.09

0.57

0.95

0.96

0.96

0.93

0.86

0.95

0.96

0.98

0.98

AIC

23.69

−2.97

−76.10

−85.07

−89.09

−66.19 −42.59 −78.11 −90.27 −107.40 −105.57

Vongvisessomjai,

Tingsanchali, and Babel
(

2010

)

Testing

SSE

4.18

2.42

0.16

0.02

0.02

0.59

1.80

0.76

0.15

0.27

0.10

CoD

0.00

0.00

0.93

0.99

0.99

0.75

0.23

0.68

0.93

0.89

0.96

AIC

57.48

37.75

−56.32 −135.57 −134.89

−13.10

27.14

0.02

−61.54

−39.24

−71.42

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

159

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

the model performance. As several previous studies show (Mayerle

1988

; Ab Ghani

1993

; Nalluri, Ghani, and El-Zaemey

1994

; May et al.

1996

; Ebtehaj and Bonakdari

2016

), the most important para-

meters in the estimation of self-cleansing conditions in sewers
can be classi

fied in dimensionless groups (Ebtehaj and Bonakdari

2016

) related to motion (F

R

*), transport (C

v

), sediment character-

istics (D

gr

, d, SG), transport mode (d/R) and

flow resistance (λ). For

example, models such as F

R

* = aC

v

α

(d/R)

ϴ

(Mayerle

1988

;

Vongvisessomjai,

Tingsanchali,

and

Babel

2010

;

Ebtehaj,

Bonakdari, and Shari

2014

; Najafzadeh, Laucelli, and Zahiri

2017

and EPR-MOGA Equation (13)) tend to represent better the experi-
mental data (CoD = [0.00, 0.99]) for almost all datasets; di

fferences

are represented by the values of the exponents

α and ϴ. Other

models, that are in the form F

R

* = aC

v

α

(d/R)

ϴ

D

gr

γ

β

ω

(Ab Ghani

1993

,

with

ω = 0; Safari et al.

2017

), also show good results (CoD = [0.56,

0.95]) for all the experimental datasets. Finally, EPR-MOGA models
in the form F

R

* = aC

v

α

(d/R)

ϴ

D

gr

γ

S

o

µ

(Equation (14) with

γ = 0 and

Equation (15)) show the highest

fitting for all the experimental

datasets (CoD = [0.84, 0.98]).

As the results in

Table 6

show, the EPR-MOGA models,

especially Equations (14 and 15), have high correlations for all
experimental data. Graphically, these results can be seen in

Figure 3

, which shows the

fitting of the self-cleansing equations

for several experimental data. The traditional Craven (

1953

)

equation underestimates the calculation of the modi

fied

Froude number for all experimental datasets. This means that
if this formula is used for the design of self-cleansing sewer
systems, the minimum slope required will be

flatter than that

actually required, increasing the risk to deposit of particles at
the bottom of the pipes.

(a)

(b)

(c) (d)

(e)  

(f)

0

2

4

6

8

10

0

2

4

6

8

10

 a

ta

de

ta

l

uc

la

C-

F

R

*

Experimental Data -

F

R

*

Present Study - Training data

Eq. (4) - Craven (1953)

Eq. (6) - Ab Ghani (1993)

Eq. (8) - Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

Eq. (15) - EPR-MOGA

0

2

4

6

8

10

0

2

4

6

8

10

Calculated Data 

-

F

R

*

Experimental Data -

F

R

*

Present Study - Testing data

Eq. (4) - Craven (1953)

Eq. (6) - Ab Ghani (1993)

Eq. (8) - Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

Eq. (15) - EPR-MOGA

0

2

4

6

8

10

0

2

4

6

8

10

 a

ta

de

ta

l

uc

la

C-

F

R

*

Experimental Data -

F

R

*

Mayerle (1988) data

Eq. (4) - Craven (1953)

Eq. (6) - Ab Ghani (1993)

Eq. (8) - Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

Eq. (15) - EPR-MOGA

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

Calculated Data 

-

F

R

*

Experimental Data -

F

R

*

Ab Ghani (1993) data

Eq. (4) - Craven (1953)

Eq. (6) - Ab Ghani (1993)

Eq. (8) - Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

Eq. (15) - EPR-MOGA

0

2

4

6

8

10

0

2

4

6

8

10

 a

ta

de

ta

l

uc

la

C

-

F

R

*

Experimental Data -

F

R

*

Ota (1999) data

Eq. (4) - Craven (1953)

Eq. (6) - Ab Ghani (1993)

Eq. (8) - Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

Eq. (15) - EPR-MOGA

0

2

4

6

8

10

0

2

4

6

8

10

Calculated Data 

-

F

R

*

Experimental Data -

F

R

*

Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010) data

Eq. (4) - Craven (1953)

Eq. (6) - Ab Ghani (1993)

Eq. (8) - Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

Eq. (15) - EPR-MOGA

Figure 3.

Fitting of traditional equations and EPR-MOGA models, using (a) Present study training data; (b) Present study testing data; (c) Mayerle (

1988

) data; (d) Ab

Ghani (

1993

) data; (e) Ota (

1999

) data and (f) Vongvisessomjai, Tingsanchali, and Babel (

2010

) data.

160

C. MONTES ET AL.

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

The modi

fied Froude number calculated by model (15) cor-

rectly represents the measured experimental data. However, for
Mayerle (

1988

) dataset when F

R

* > 4.0, all the self-cleansing

equations, including the EPR-MOGA models, tend to sub-estimate
the real value. The other experimental datasets can be correctly
represented by EPR-MOGA models. This increase in the model
accuracy can be explained by the inclusion of the pipe slope
parameter in the self-cleansing models. The accuracy increases
in all cases, which means that this parameter can be signi

ficant in

the prediction of self-cleansing capacity in sewer pipes.

Conclusions

The study proposes new self-cleansing models based on data
collected from a set of 44 lab experiments conducted on a
242 mm diameter acrylic pipe with varying steady-state

flow

conditions and sediment characteristics. The data collected this
way were processed using the EPR-MOGA-XL modelling tech-
nique to derive three new self-cleansing models based on
respective optimization strategies. The new self-cleansing mod-
els were validated with collected experimental data but also
the corresponding data found in the literature. A comparison to
eight self-cleansing equations published previously in the lit-
erature was also performed in the process. This was done using
four di

fferent evaluation metrics. Based on the results obtained

the following conclusions are made:

(1) EPR-MOGA-based models showed overall better performance

than traditional self-cleansing models. This is attributed to the
proposed self-cleansing models include the pipe slope para-
meter to calculate the modi

fied Froude number. By including

this parameter in the estimation of self-cleansing in sewer
pipes, a better

fitting is observed in all the experimental

datasets considered.

(2) In addition, the EPR-based new models tend to represent, in a

better way, the experimental data for the whole range of
variation for the existing experimental data (e.g. d = [0.20

8.74 mm], v

l

= [0.24

–1.25 m s

−1

], C

v

= [0.27

–1,450 ppm], and

S

o

= [0.04

–2.56%], amongst other parameter variation). The

reason for this is that EPR-MOGA approach trades-o

ff model

prediction accuracy with model generalization capability
ensuring over

fitting is avoided in the model development

process.

Based on the above, new self-cleansing models can be use-

ful for the design of new sewer systems by estimating the
threshold self-cleansing

flow conditions.

It is recommended to continue the experimental investiga-

tion of sediment transport, especially in large sewer pipes and
considering di

fferent flow regimes (e.g. non-steady flow condi-

tions) as self-cleansing conditions are less well understood
under these conditions. In addition, di

fferent sediment charac-

teristics, hydraulic conditions and non-circular cross sections
should be evaluated in the future, including experiments for
cohesive material.

Disclosure Statement

No potential con

flict of interest was reported by the author(s).

References

Ab Ghani, A.

1993

.

“Sediment Transport in Sewers.” PhD diss., University of

Newcastle Upon Tyne. Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

Ab Ghani, A., A. Salem, R. Abdullah, A. Yahaya, and N. Zakaria.

1999

.

“Incipient Motion of Sediment Particles over Deposited Loose Beds in
a Rectangular Channels.

” In Proceedings of the 8th International

Conference on Urban Storm Drainage, 157

–163. Sydney, Australia.

Ackers, J., D. Butler, D. Leggett, and R. May.

2001

.

“Designing Sewers to

Control Sediment Problems.

” In Urban Drainage Modeling: Proceedings of

the Specialty Symposium Held in Conjunction with the World Water and
Environmental Resources Congress, edited by Robert W. Brashear and
Cedo Maksimovic, 818

–823. Orlando, FL. doi:

10.1061/9780784405833

Ackers, J., D. Butler, and R. May.

1996

.

“Design of Sewers to Control

Sediment Problems.

” Report 141. London, UK: Construction Industry

Research and Information Association (CIRIA).

Alvarez-Hernandez, E.

1990

.

“The Influence of Cohesion on Sediment

Movement in Channels of Circular Cross-Section.

” PhD diss., University

of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

American Society of Civil Engineers [ASCE].

1970

.

“Design and Construction

of Sanitary and Storm Sewers.

” Report No. 37. New York, USA: American

Society of Civil Engineers Manuals and Reports on Engineering Practices.

Arora, A.

1983

.

“Velocity Distribution and Sediment Transport in Rigid-Bed

Open Channels.

” PhD diss., University of Roorkee. Roorkee, India.

Ashley, R., J. L. Bertrand-Krajewski, T. Hvitved-Jacobsen, and M. Verbanck.

2004

.

“Solids in Sewers.” Scientific and Technical Report Series. London:

IWA Publishing.

Ashley, R., and M. Verbanck.

1996

.

“Mechanics of Sewer Sediment Erosion

and Transport.

” Journal of Hydraulic Research 34 (6): 753–770.

doi:

10.1080/00221689609498448

.

ASTM D854-14.

2014

. Standard Test Methods for Speci

fic Gravity of Soil Solids

by Water Pycnometer. West Conshohocken, PA: ASTM International.

Azamathulla, H., A. A. Ghani, and S. Fei.

2012

.

“ANFIS-Based Approach for

Predicting Sediment Transport in Clean Sewer.

” Applied Soft Computing

Journal 12 (3): 1227

–1230. doi:

10.1016/j.asoc.2011.12.003

.

Bertrand-Krajewski, J., P. B. Luc, and O. Scrivener.

1993

.

“Sewer Sediment

Production and Transport Modelling: A Literature Review.

” Journal of

Hydraulic Research 31 (4): 435

–460. doi:

10.1080/00221689309498869

.

Bizier, P., Ed.

2007

. Gravity Sanitary Sewer Design and Construction. 2nd ed.

Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers.

Bong, C.

2013

.

“Self-Cleansing Urban Drain Using Sediment Flushing Gate

Based on Incipient Motion.

” PhD diss., Universiti Sains Malaysia. Penang,

Malaysia.

Butler, D., and J. Davies.

2011

. Urban Drainage. 3rd ed. London, UK: Spon

Press.

Butler, D., R. May, and J. Ackers.

1996

.

“Sediment Transport in Sewers Part 1:

Background.

” In Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Water,

Maritime and Energy 118 (2): 103

–112. doi:

10.1680/iwtme.1996.28431

.

Butler, D., R. May, and J. Ackers.

2003

.

“Self-Cleansing Sewer Design Based

on Sediment Transport Principles.

” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 129

(4): 276

–282. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2003)129:4(276)

.

Camp, T.

1946

.

“Design of Sewers to Facilitate Flow.” Sewage Works Journal

18 (1): 3

–16.

Craven, J.

1953

.

“The Transportation of Sand in Pipes I. Full-Pipe Flow.” In

Proceedings of the Fifth Hydraulics Conference, 67

–76. Iowa City, IA.

Ebtehaj, I., and H. Bonakdari.

2013

.

“Evaluation of Sediment Transport in

Sewer Using Arti

ficial Neural Network.” Engineering Applications of

Computational

Fluid

Mechanics

7

(3):

382

–392. doi:

10.1080/

19942060.2013.11015479

.

Ebtehaj, I., and H. Bonakdari.

2016

.

“Bed Load Sediment Transport in Sewers

at Limit of Deposition.

” Scientia Iranica 23 (3): 907–917. doi:

10.24200/

sci.2016.2169

.

Ebtehaj, I., H. Bonakdari, and A. Shari

fi.

2014

.

“Design Criteria for Sediment

Transport in Sewers Based on Self-Cleansing Concept.

” Journal of

Zhejiang University SCIENCE A 15 (11): 914

–924. doi:

10.1631/jzus.

A1300135

.

El-Baroudy, I., A. Elshorbagy, S. Carey, O. Giustolisi, and D. Savic.

2010

.

“Comparison of Three Data-Driven Techniques in Modelling the
Evapotranspiration Process.

” Journal of Hydroinformatics 12 (4): 365–

379. doi:

10.2166/hydro.2010.029

.

URBAN WATER JOURNAL

161

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/2505fed8630decc2d6a9df76928e2600/index-html.html
background image

El-Zaemey, A.

1991

.

“Sediment Transport over Deposited Beds in Sewers.”

PhD diss., University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

Giustolisi, O., and D. Savic.

2004

.

“A Novel Genetic Programming Strategy:

Evolutionary Polynomial Regression.

” In Proceedings of the 6th

International Conference on Hydroinformatics, 787

–794. Singapore.

Giustolisi, O., and D. Savic.

2006

.

“A Symbolic Data-Driven Technique Based

on Evolutionary Polynomial Regression.

” Journal of Hydroinformatics 8

(3): 207

–222. doi:

10.2166/hydro.2006.020b

.

Giustolisi, O., and D. Savic.

2009

.

“Advances in Data-Driven Analyses and

Modelling Using EPR-MOGA.

” Journal of Hydroinformatics 11 (3–4): 225–

236. doi:

10.2166/hydro.2009.017

.

Laucelli, D., L. Berardi, A. Doglioni, and O. Giustolisi.

2012

.

“EPR-MOGA-XL:

An Excel Based Paradigm to Enhance Transfer of Research Achievements
on Data-Driven Modeling.

” In Proceedings of 10th International

Conference on Hydroinformatics HIC, 14

–18. Hamburg, Germany.

Macke, E.

1982

.

“About Sediment at Low Concentrations in Partly Filled

Pipes.

” PhD diss., Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany.

Braunschweig, Germany.

May, R.

1982

.

“Sediment Transport in Sewers.” Report IT 222. Wallingford,

UK: Hydraulics Research Wallingford.

May, R.

1993

.

“Sediment Transport in Pipes and Sewers with Deposited

Beds.

” Report SR 320. Wallingford, UK: Hydraulics Research Wallingford.

May, R., J. Ackers, D. Butler, and S. John.

1996

.

“Development of Design

Methodology for Self-Cleansing Sewers.

” Water Science and Technology

33 (9): 195

–205. doi:

10.2166/wst.1996.0210

.

May, R., P. Brown, G. Hare, and K. Jones.

1989

.

“Self-Cleansing Conditions for

Sewers Carrying Sediment.

” Report SR 221. Wallingford, UK: Hydraulics

Research Wallingford.

Mayerle, R.

1988

.

“Sediment Transport in Rigid Boundary Channels.” PhD

diss., University of Newcastle upon Tyne. Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

Mayerle, R., C. Nalluri, and P. Novak.

1991

.

“Sediment Transport in Rigid Bed

Conveyances.

” Journal of Hydraulic Research 29 (4): 475–495.

doi:

10.1080/00221689109498969

.

Mays, L.

2001

. Stormwater Collection Systems Design Handbook. New York:

McGraw-Hill.

Merritt, L.

2009

.

“Tractive Force Design for Sanitary Sewer Self-Cleansing.”

Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 135 (12): 1338

–1348.

Minister of Interior.

1977

. Instruction Technique Relative Aux Réseaux

D

’assainissement Des Agglomerations, IT 77284 I. Paris, France: Minister

of interior: circulaire interministerielle.

Montes, C., L. Berardi, Z. Kapelan, and J. Saldarriaga.

2018

.

“Evaluation of

Sediment Transport in Sewers Using the EPR-MOGA-XL.

” In 1st Water

Distribution Systems Analysis - Computing and Control for the Water
Industry Joint Conference, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Montes, C., Z. Kapelan, and J. Saldarriaga.

2019

.

“Impact of Self-Cleansing

Criteria Choice on the Optimal Design of Sewer Networks in South
America.

” Water 11 (6): 1148. doi:

10.3390/w11061148

.

Najafzadeh, M., D. Laucelli, and A. Zahiri.

2017

.

“Application of Model Tree

and Evolutionary Polynomial Regression for Evaluation of Sediment
Transport in Pipes.

” KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering 21 (5): 1956–1963.

doi:

10.1007/s12205-016-1784-7

.

Nalluri, C., A. A. Ghani, and A. El-Zaemey.

1994

.

“Sediment Transport over

Deposited Beds in Sewers.

” Water Science and Technology 29 (1–2): 125–133.

Nalluri, C., and A. A. Ghani.

1996

.

“Design Options for Self-Cleansing Storm

Sewers.

” Water Science and Technology 33 (9): 215–220. doi:

10.2166/

wst.1996.0214

.

Novak, P., and C. Nalluri.

1975

.

“Sediment Transport in Smooth Fixed Bed

Channels.

” Journal of the Hydraulics Division of the American Society of

Civil Engineering 101 (HY9): 1139

–1154.

Novak, P., and C. Nalluri.

1984

.

“Incipient Motion of Sediment Particles over

Fixed Beds.

” Journal of Hydraulic Research 22 (3): 181–197. doi:

10.1080/

00221688409499405

.

Ota, J.

1999

.

“Effect of Particle Size and Gradation on Sediment Transport in

Storm Sewers.

” PhD diss., University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Newcastle

Upon Tyne, UK.

Perrusquía, G.

1991

.

“Bedload Transport in Storm Sewers: Stream Traction in

Pipe Channels.

” PhD diss., Chalmers University of Technology.

Gothenburg, Sweden.

Pulliah, V.

1978

.

“Transport of Fine Suspended Sediment in Smooth Rigid

Bed Channels.

” PhD diss., University of Roorkee. Roorkee, India.

Robinson, M., and W. Graf.

1972

. Critical Deposit Velocities for Low-

Concentration Sand-Water Mixtures. Atlanta, GA: ASCE National Water
Resources Engineering Meeting.

Safari, M., H. Aksoy, and M. Mohammadi.

2015

.

“Incipient Deposition of

Sediment in Rigid Boundary Open Channels.

” Environmental Fluid

Mechanics 15 (5): 1053

–1068. doi:

10.1007/s10652-015-9401-8

.

Safari, M., H. Aksoy, N. Unal, and M. Mohammadi.

2017

.

“Non-Deposition Self-

Cleansing Design Criteria for Drainage Systems.

” Journal of Hydro-

Environment Research 14 (2017): 76

–84. doi:

10.1016/j.jher.2016.11.002

.

Safari, M., M. Mohammadi, and A. A. Ghani.

2018

.

“Experimental Studies of

Self-Cleansing Drainage System Design: A Review.

” Journal of Pipeline

Systems Engineering and Practice 9 (4): 04018017. doi:

10.1061/(ASCE)

PS.1949-1204.0000335

.

Vanoni, V., Ed.

2006

. Sedimentation Engineering. Reston, VA: American

Society of Civil Engineers.

Vongvisessomjai, N., T. Tingsanchali, and M. Babel.

2010

.

“Non-Deposition

Design Criteria for Sewers with Part-Full Flow.

” Urban Water Journal 7 (1):

61

–77. doi:

10.1080/15730620903242824

.

162

C. MONTES ET AL.

¿Quiere saber más? Contáctenos

Declaro haber leído y aceptado la Política de Privacidad