Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes.

Understanding sediment transport is important for designing self-cleansing sewer systems. Sewer deposits are the source of several problems

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer

pipes

Carlos Montes, Sergio Vanegas, Zoran Kapelan, Luigi Berardi

and Juan Saldarriaga

ABSTRACT

Multiple models from the literature and experimental datasets have been developed and collected to

predict sediment transport in sewers. However, all these models were developed for smaller sewer

pipes, i.e. using experimental data collected on pipes with diameters smaller than 500 mm. To

address this issue, new experimental data were collected on a larger, 595 mm pipe located in a

laboratory at the University of los Andes. Two new self-cleansing models were developed using this

dataset. Both models predict the sewer self-cleansing velocity for the cases of non-deposition with

and without deposited bed. The newly developed and existing models were then evaluated and

compared on the basis of the most recently collected and previously published datasets. Models

were compared in terms of prediction accuracy measured by the root mean squared error and mean

absolute percentage error. The results obtained show that in the existing literature, self-cleansing

models tend to be over

fitted, i.e. have a rather high prediction accuracy when applied to the data

collected by the authors, but this accuracy deteriorates quickly when applied to the datasets

collected by other authors. The newly developed models can be used for designing both small and

large sewer pipes with and without deposited bed condition.

Carlos Montes (corresponding author)
Department of Civil and Environmental

Engineering,

Universidad de los Andes,
Bogotá,
Colombia
E-mail: cd.montes1256@uniandes.edu.co

Sergio Vanegas
Department of Civil and Environmental

Engineering,

Universidad de los Andes,
Bogotá,
Colombia

Zoran Kapelan
Department of Water Management,
Delft University of Technology,
Delft,
The Netherlands

Luigi Berardi
Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Geologia,
Università degli Studi Gabriele d

’Annunzio Chieti e

Pescara,

Pescara,
Italy

Juan Saldarriaga
Department of Civil and Environmental

Engineering,

Universidad de los Andes,
Bogotá,
Colombia

Key words

|

bedload, deposited bed, non-deposition, sediment transport, self-cleansing

INTRODUCTION

Understanding sediment transport is important for design-
ing self-cleansing sewer systems. Sewer deposits are the
source of several problems, such as the reduction of
hydraulic capacity, blockage and premature over

flows

(

Shirazi et al.



;

Ebtehaj et al.



;

Torres et al.



;

Kargar et al.



;

Montes et al.



;

Safari



). Tradition-

ally, conventional minimum velocities and shear stress
values have been suggested to de

fine self-cleansing con-

ditions, both in academic literature (

Yao



;

Ackers

et al.



) and industry design manuals (

British Standard

Institution



;

Great Lakes



). Several authors (

Yao



;

Nalluri & Ab Ghani



) have shown that the use

of these traditional criteria and conventional values is
likely to lead to overdesigning the slope for small diameter

pipes (i.e. pipes with diameter D smaller than 500 mm).
To address this issue, laboratory investigations have been
carried out (e.g.

May et al.



;

Ab Ghani



;

Vongvisessomjai et al.



;

Safari et al.

a

;

Alihosseini

& Thamsen



). These studies focused on estimating the

self-cleansing conditions and developing corresponding
predictive models in which the minimum self-cleansing
velocity (V

l

) is a function of several input variables,

such as the mean particle diameter (d), the hydraulic
radius (R), the speci

fic gravity of sediments (SG), the dimen-

sionless grain size (D

gr

) or the volumetric sediment

concentration (C

v

).

According to

Safari et al. (

)

, the above and similar

experimental works have studied two self-cleansing design

606

© IWA Publishing 2020

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

doi: 10.2166/wst.2020.154

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

criteria: (i) criteria for bed sediment motion and (ii) criteria
for sediment non-deposition in sewer pipes. Both criteria are
useful for predicting the self-cleansing conditions. In this
paper, the non-deposition design criterion is studied using
an experimental approach.

Traditionally, non-deposition self-cleansing design cri-

teria

have

been

classi

fied in two general groups

(

Vongvisessomjai et al.



;

Safari et al.



): (i) non-depo-

sition without deposited bed and (ii) non-deposition with
deposited bed of sediments.

The

first group, non-deposition without deposited bed, is

a conservative and frequently used criterion for designing
self-cleansing sewer systems. In this context,

Robinson &

Graf (

)

de

fined critical mean velocity (or minimum

self-cleansing velocity, as presented in this study) as the con-
dition in which particles begin deposition and form a
stationary deposit at the bottom of the sewer pipe, i.e. the
particles do not form a permanent deposit.

Several studies have been carried out in this

field, in

which models are proposed for the prediction of a minimum
self-cleansing velocity that guarantees the non-deposition of
particles in sewer pipes. In this context,

Mayerle (

)

ana-

lysed the sediment transport in a 152 mm diameter pipe
using uniform sand ranging from 0.50 mm to 8.74 mm,
and sediment concentration between 20 and 1,275 ppm.

May et al. (

)

analysed sediment transport in a 300 mm

diameter concrete pipe using non-cohesive material with a
mean particle diameter of 0.72 mm.

May (

)

used a

450 mm diameter concrete pipe to study the transport of
sands with a mean particle diameter of 0.73 mm.

Ab

Ghani (

)

studied the non-deposition sediment transport

without deposited bed in three sewer pipes of 154 mm,
305 mm and 450 mm, varying the particle diameter from
0.46 mm to 8.3 mm.

Ota (

)

carried out experiments in

a 305 mm sewer pipe varying the particle diameter from
0.714 mm to 5.612 mm.

Vongvisessomjai et al. (

)

devel-

oped two models for bedload transport and two models for
suspended load transport using data collected in two pipes
of 100 mm and 150 mm diameter.

Safari et al. (

a

) con-

ducted experiments in a trapezoidal channel and proposed
an equation which includes the cross-section shape factor
(

β). Recently,

Montes et al. (

)

collected experimental

data from

Ab Ghani (

)

and using an evolutionary

polynomial regression multi-objective genetic algorithm
(EPR-MOGA) developed new self-cleansing models.

The above studies resulted in a series of predictive

models for the estimation of self-cleansing velocity but
none of them analysed self-cleansing velocity in the context
of larger sewer pipes. As a result, all non-deposition

self-cleansing models are only useful for designing small
sewer pipes (D

< 500 mm).

Usually, the equations reported in the literature for

non-deposition without deposited bed criterion are in the
form of:

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ aC

b

v

d

R

or

d

D

c

1

D

c

2

gr

λ

c

3

(1)

where g the gravitational acceleration;

λ the Darcy’s friction

factor; D

gr

the dimensionless grain size

¼ d

SG

 1

ν

2

1

3

 

!

;

SG

the speci

fic gravity of sediments; ν the kinematic vis-

cosity of water; D the pipe diameter; and a, b, c

1

, c

2

, c

3

are coef

ficients, which vary with each study. For example,

in the

Ab Ghani (

)

model, a

¼ 3.08, b ¼ 0.21, c

1

¼ 0.53,

c

2

¼ 0.09 and c

3

¼ 0.21:

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 3:08C

0

:21

v

d

R

 

0:53

D

0:09

gr

λ

0:21

(2)

The second group, non-deposition with deposited bed, is

a less conservative criterion used for the design of large self-
cleansing sewer systems (D

> 500 mm) (

Safari et al.



). In

this criterion, a small permanent sediment bed is allowed at
the bottom of the pipe. Several investigations (

May et al.



;

El-Zaemey



;

Ab Ghani



;

Butler et al.



)

have found that a permanent sediment bed, with mean pro-
portional sediment depth (y

s

=D) close to 1.0%, increases the

sediment transport capacity. However, strong supervision of
the systems is required because it is close to critical con-
dition (

Vongvisessomjai et al.



).

Based on the aforementioned, several studies have been

carried out for describing this phenomenon using predictive
numerical models based on experimental data. Experiments
by

El-Zaemey (

)

were carried out in a 305 mm diameter

pipe using bed sediment thicknesses of 47 mm, 77 mm and
120 mm, and granular sediments ranging from 0.53 mm to
8.4 mm in size.

Perrusquía (

)

studied the sediment trans-

port in a 225 mm diameter concrete pipe using uniform-
sized sands of 0.9 mm and 2.5 mm.

May (

)

conducted

experiments in a 450 mm diameter pipe using two uniform
sands with a mean particle diameter of 0.73 mm and
0.47 mm.

Ab Ghani (

)

used a 450 mm diameter pipe

varying the deposited bed width (W

b

) from 47 mm to

384 mm.

Nalluri et al. (

)

used the data collected from

El-Zaemey (

)

and modi

fied the

May et al. (

)

model

to predict self-cleansing conditions in deposited bed

607

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

sewers.

Safari et al. (

b)

used the particle swarm optimiz-

ation (PSO) algorithm to improve the

May (

)

model;

good results were obtained with this new model. Recently,

Safari & Shirzad (

)

de

fined an optimum deposited bed

thickness, and proposed a new self-cleansing model for
sewers with deposited bed.

Models found in the literature to predict the non-depo-

sition bedload transport with deposited bed are in terms of
the deposited bed width or the mean proportional sediment
bed. As an example, a model was outlined by

El-Zaemey

(

)

in the following form, where Y is the water level and

W

b

the deposited bed width:

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 1:95C

0

:17

v

W

b

Y

0:40

d

D

 

0:57

λ

0

:10

(3)

As can be seen from the aforementioned, several

authors have studied the sediment transport modes to
develop new self-cleansing criteria. Each author has devel-
oped predictive models which are useful for designing new
sewer infrastructure. However, various limitations have
been identi

fied in the use of self-cleansing models. For

example,

Safari et al. (

)

pointed out that non-deposition

without deposited bed is useful only in small sewers; for
large pipe diameters, the non-deposition with deposited
bed criterion must be applied. However, models developed
for deposited bed conditions present poor accuracy when
different datasets are used (

Nalluri et al.



). Recently,

Safari et al. (

)

highlighted the poor performance of the

equations found in this criterion and recommend further
experimental research in this

field. In addition,

Perrusquía

(

)

suggested further experimental work, especially in

large sewer pipe diameters (i.e. pipe diameter large than
500 mm).

In this study, new self-cleansing models for non-

deposition without deposited bed and deposited bed were

developed. A 595 mm diameter PVC was used to collect
experimental data. The aim was to improve sediment trans-
port prediction in large sewer pipes, based on a new
experimental dataset.

EXPERIMENTAL METHODS

Experimental data were collected on a 595 mm diameter
and 10.5 m long PVC pipe, located in the Hydraulics
Laboratory of the University of los Andes, Colombia. This
pipe was supported on a variable steel truss, allowing pipe
slopes between 0.042% and 3.44%. The pipe was directly
connected to a 30 m

3

upstream tank which was supplied

through a 40 HP pump. The

flow rate was controlled

using a manually operated valve, allowing it to vary from
0.6 L s

1

to 67.3 L s

1

. The pipe had four-point gauges to

measure the water depth along the entire length of the
flume. A sediment feeder was used to supply granular
material with a mean particle diameter ranging from
0.35 mm to 2.60 mm to the PVC pipe. The speci

fic gravity

of sediments varied from 2.64 to 2.67, which was calculated
using the pycnometer method, according to ASTM D854-10
(

ASTM D

- 

).

Figure 1

shows the general scheme of

the experimental setup.

The experiments were carried out under uniform

flow

conditions, i.e. no variations in

flowrate and water depth,

for both non-deposition criteria. The data collection strat-
egies were similar for both cases; however, the main
difference related to the sediment supply to the PVC pipe,
which depended on the criterion to be studied. In this con-
text, for the non-deposition without deposited bed criterion,
the sediment feeder supplied the material until the particles
barely moved with the water and did not form a permanent
deposit at the bottom of the pipe. In contrast, for non-depo-
sition with deposited bed, sediment was supplied to form a
deposited loose bed along the entire length of the

flume.

Figure 1

|

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup.

608

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

This methodology followed the guidelines of several pre-
vious experimental works carried out by different authors
(e.g.

Novak & Nalluri



;

Ota



;

Perrusquía



;

Ab

Ghani



;

Vongvisessomjai et al.



;

Safari et al.

a

;

Alihosseini & Thamsen



). The methodology used to col-

lect the data in both cases is described below.

Non-deposition without deposited bed

The

first case considered in this paper is the non-depo-

sition without deposited bed condition. The collection of
experimental data was as follows. Firstly, the pipe slope
was mechanically adjusted and the value was measured
using a dumpy level. Secondly, the

flow control valve

was opened and a constant

flow of water was supplied

to the pipe. The

flowrate was measured with a real-time

electromagnetic

flowmeter which was connected directly

to the pipe feeding the upstream tank. Thirdly, the water
levels were measured using the four-point gauges. The
downstream tailgate was adjusted until the water depth
varied less than

±2 mm between the four-point gauges,

which is the condition in which uniform

flow conditions

could be assumed (

Ab Ghani



). Using the values

recorded of

flowrate and water level, the mean velocity

was computed. Fourthly, when uniform

flow conditions

were achieved, the sediment was supplied to the pipe.
The sediment feeder was slowly opened until the non-
deposition condition was obtained. This condition, also
known as

‘flume traction’, (i.e. no separated dunes present

and no deposition of stationary material at the bottom of
the pipe) was checked by visual inspection. Finally, the
sediment supply rate (

m

) was estimated by weighing

the amount of material that passed in a given time at
the outlet of the sediment feeder. The sediment discharge
was estimated as Q

s

¼ €

m

s

, where

ρ

s

is the particle den-

sity. The calculated sediment discharge was used to
compute

the

volumetric

sediment

concentration

(C

v

¼ Q

s

=Q).

The experimental procedure above was repeated for sev-

eral

flowrates, pipe slopes and sediment sizes. A total of 107

data for the non-deposition without deposited bed condition
were collected using above experimental approach, as
shown in

Table 1

.

Non-deposition with deposited bed

The methodology used to collect the experimental data for
the non-deposition with deposited bed case was similar

Table 1

|

Non-deposition without deposited bed experimental data collected in the

595 mm PVC pipe

Run no.

d

SG

C

v

R

S

o

V

l

(mm)

(

)

(ppm)

(mm)

(%)

(m/s)

1

1.51

2.66

10,119

9.88

1.78

0.61

2

1.51

2.66

11,609

7.27

1.78

0.51

3

1.51

2.66

3,940

11.83

1.57

0.67

4

1.51

2.66

3,803

14.41

1.57

0.84

5

1.51

2.66

3,892

18.89

1.22

1.02

6

1.51

2.66

3,681

14.41

0.96

0.77

7

1.51

2.66

19,957

7.92

3.43

0.63

8

1.51

2.66

14,854

9.23

3.43

0.77

9

1.51

2.66

16,731

10.53

3.43

0.97

10

1.51

2.66

13,608

12.48

2.74

0.75

11

1.51

2.66

13,841

10.53

2.74

0.75

12

0.35

2.65

8,720

9.88

2.70

0.80

13

0.35

2.65

6,431

10.53

1.43

0.73

14

0.35

2.65

588

14.41

0.25

0.45

15

0.35

2.65

736

16.98

0.25

0.56

16

0.35

2.65

700

20.16

0.25

0.62

17

0.35

2.65

726

23.32

0.68

0.71

18

0.35

2.65

1,227

25.82

0.68

0.77

19

0.35

2.65

2,499

19.53

1.23

0.85

20

0.35

2.65

2,280

20.79

0.89

0.93

21

0.35

2.65

1,909

27.38

0.89

0.93

22

0.35

2.65

4,155

14.41

1.36

0.71

23

0.35

2.65

3,279

18.89

1.36

0.84

24

0.35

2.65

2,498

22.06

1.36

0.97

25

0.35

2.65

2,051

25.51

1.36

1.02

26

0.47

2.66

4,012

13.77

1.36

0.74

27

0.47

2.66

2,804

18.89

1.36

0.88

28

0.47

2.66

3,153

22.06

1.36

0.98

29

0.47

2.66

3,410

25.20

1.36

1.02

30

0.47

2.66

1,837

27.07

0.89

0.91

31

0.47

2.66

1,658

24.26

0.89

0.84

32

0.47

2.66

1,668

20.16

0.89

0.80

33

0.47

2.66

3,276

14.41

0.89

0.66

34

0.47

2.66

796

28.93

0.42

0.82

35

0.47

2.66

667

33.85

0.42

0.87

36

0.47

2.66

913

40.80

0.42

0.98

37

0.47

2.66

1

79.69

0.04

0.45

38

0.47

2.66

17

95.27

0.04

0.56

39

0.47

2.66

20

107.70

0.04

0.65

40

0.47

2.66

47

119.29

0.08

0.73

(continued)

609

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

to the one used for the non-deposition without deposited
bed case. The main difference related to the supply of sedi-
ment into the pipe, as the non-deposition with deposited
bed case required constant sediment thickness throughout
the entire length of the test. The whole data collection strat-
egy was as follows. Firstly, an initial pipe slope was
mechanically adjusted, and the

flow control valve was

opened. As a result, a constant water

flow was supplied to

the pipe, and its value was recorded with the real-time elec-
tromagnetic

flowmeter. Secondly, the sediment feeder was

slowly opened until the material formed a permanent depos-
ited loose bed, which was continuously monitored by visual
inspection. Thirdly, the water levels were recorded using the
four-point gauges, and uniform conditions were checked for.
If non-uniform conditions were observed, the downstream

Table 1

|

continued

Run no.

d

SG

C

v

R

S

o

V

l

(mm)

(

)

(ppm)

(mm)

(%)

(m/s)

41

0.47

2.66

43

100.77

0.17

0.79

42

0.47

2.66

6

88.37

0.17

0.60

43

1.22

2.67

955

22.37

0.68

0.77

44

1.22

2.67

1,043

25.20

0.68

0.81

45

1.22

2.67

1,150

28.00

0.68

0.85

46

1.22

2.67

1,341

30.78

0.68

0.91

47

1.22

2.67

1,130

33.24

0.68

0.90

48

1.22

2.67

1,421

38.40

0.68

1.02

49

1.22

2.67

943

39.90

0.42

0.96

50

1.22

2.67

826

33.85

0.42

0.86

51

1.22

2.67

745

24.89

0.42

0.71

52

1.22

2.67

13

72.82

0.17

0.50

53

1.22

2.67

14

88.12

0.17

0.62

54

1.22

2.67

20

93.57

0.08

0.60

55

1.22

2.67

44

106.11

0.08

0.67

56

1.22

2.67

30

103.58

0.08

0.58

57

1.22

2.67

1,748

28.93

0.89

1.01

58

1.22

2.67

1,639

25.82

0.89

0.94

59

1.22

2.67

1,099

19.84

0.89

0.83

60

1.22

2.67

3,322

18.89

1.10

0.90

61

1.22

2.67

2,123

14.41

1.10

0.71

62

1.22

2.67

2,185

23.00

1.10

1.02

63

1.22

2.67

2,645

22.69

1.40

1.04

64

1.22

2.67

2,791

18.25

1.40

0.95

65

1.22

2.67

3,692

14.41

1.40

0.71

66

2.60

2.64

83

80.73

0.21

0.75

67

2.60

2.64

129

90.37

0.21

0.87

68

1.51

2.66

21

90.86

0.04

0.60

69

1.51

2.66

62

89.12

0.04

0.79

70

1.51

2.66

44

87.37

0.04

0.74

71

1.51

2.66

68

86.36

0.13

0.75

72

1.51

2.66

54

74.69

0.13

0.66

73

1.51

2.66

70

72.02

0.21

0.70

74

1.51

2.66

96

78.91

0.21

0.76

75

1.51

2.66

66

84.84

0.21

0.78

76

1.51

2.66

76

86.61

0.04

0.76

77

1.51

2.66

80

88.37

0.04

0.78

78

1.51

2.66

2,729

17.62

1.19

1.10

79

1.51

2.66

1,701

20.48

0.72

0.87

80

1.51

2.66

2,086

18.89

0.93

0.99

81

1.51

2.66

4,066

9.23

1.19

0.62

(continued)

Table 1

|

continued

Run no.

d

SG

C

v

R

S

o

V

l

(mm)

(

)

(ppm)

(mm)

(%)

(m/s)

82

1.51

2.66

6,869

7.92

1.91

0.78

83

1.51

2.66

6,253

7.92

1.78

0.78

84

2.60

2.64

18

92.83

0.04

0.59

85

2.60

2.64

23

101.71

0.04

0.64

86

2.60

2.64

527

48.77

0.47

1.14

87

2.60

2.64

903

38.10

0.47

1.00

88

2.60

2.64

1,068

29.55

0.47

0.88

89

2.60

2.64

541

57.39

0.47

1.24

90

2.60

2.64

1,373

41.69

1.23

1.41

91

2.60

2.64

2,800

33.24

1.23

1.22

92

0.35

2.65

83

42.88

0.04

0.41

93

0.35

2.65

86

50.52

0.04

0.57

94

0.35

2.65

176

55.97

0.04

0.64

95

0.35

2.65

188

63.01

0.04

0.74

96

0.35

2.65

32

82.28

0.04

0.61

97

0.35

2.65

85

103.34

0.04

0.80

98

0.35

2.65

500

54.55

2.54

1.21

99

0.35

2.65

843

42.88

2.54

1.09

100

0.35

2.65

963

33.85

2.54

1.00

101

2.60

2.64

3,025

11.51

0.89

0.61

102

2.60

2.64

1,945

19.53

0.89

0.88

103

2.60

2.64

1,869

26.14

0.89

1.06

104

2.60

2.64

1,726

31.71

0.89

1.11

105

2.60

2.64

999

32.93

0.59

1.05

106

2.60

2.64

994

40.20

0.59

1.13

107

2.60

2.64

824

48.77

0.59

1.19

610

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

tailgate was varied until water level differences were smaller
than

±2 mm between the four-point gauges. In this step, if

the non-deposition with deposited bed condition changed
(because a permanent deposit or dunes formed by the
change in water level), the pipe slope and the tailgate were
iteratively adjusted until uniform

flow conditions and a con-

stant sediment width had been observed for at least 15 min.
Fourthly, the water level, the pipe slope and the sediment
width values were recorded, and the sediment thickness
(using the sediment width value) and

flow velocity (using

flowrate and water level) were calculated. Finally, the
sediment supply rate was measured at the outlet of the
pipe. The sediment that passed in a given time was collected,
dried and weighed, and the sediment discharge was calcu-
lated, as described in the

‘Non-deposition without deposited

bed

’ section. Five samples of sediments were collected to vali-

date that the sediment supply rate was constant during the
entire test. The volumetric sediment concentration was com-
puted using the sediment discharge and the

flowrate.

The experimental procedure described was repeated for

several

flowrates, pipe slopes and sediment sizes. A total of

54 experiments were carried out to collect data for the non-
deposition with deposited bed case. The experimental data
collected this way is presented in

Table 2

.

Literature data

Other datasets were collected from the literature for the self-
cleansing models shown in

Table 3

. A total of 483 and 400

data for non-deposition without deposited bed and with
deposited bed, respectively, were collected. These data
were used to evaluate the performance of the self-cleansing
models proposed in this study.

NEW SELF-CLEANSING MODELS

The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator
(LASSO) (

Tibshirani



) regression method was used in

this study to develop new self-cleansing models. The
LASSO method can be seen as an extension of ordinary
least squares (OLS), because it minimizes the value of the
residual sum of squares (RSS). However, this is a shrinkage
method for feature selection which itself solves the problem
of multicollinearity by increasing the bias of the regression
in search of decrease in the variance. Additionally, it uses
the absolute value of the coef

ficients in the shrinkage pen-

alty, which allows this method to reduce some of the
regression coef

ficients to an exact value of zero. This helps

to avoid problems related to model interpretation and over-
fitting (

James et al.



). The LASSO method coef

ficients

minimize the following expression:

min

X

n

i

¼1

y

i

β

0

þ

X

p

j

¼1

β

j

x

ij

0
@

1
A

0
@

1
A

2

þ λ

L

X

p

j

¼1

j

j

2
6

4

3
7

5

¼ min RSS þ λ

L

X

p

j

¼1

j

j

2
4

3
5

(4)

where y

i

are the observed values; n the number of data;

β

0

the intercept value;

β

j

the model parameter j; x

ij

the input

variable set and

λ

L

P

p

j

¼1

j

j the shrinkage penalty (

James

et al.



).

Selection of model input variables to represent the particle

Froude number are made based on the variables that have the
greatest impact on sediment transport. Several authors (

May

et al.



;

Ebtehaj & Bonakdari

a

,

b

) found that the

size and roughness of the pipe (represented by the Darcy fric-
tion factor and the pipe diameter), the relative

flow depth, the

diameter of particle size, the speci

fic gravity of sediments and

the volumetric sediment concentration are the input variables
that best predict sediment transport. These input variables
can be divided into four dimensionless groups called: (i) trans-
port: de

fined by the volumetric sediment concentration; (ii)

sediment: de

fined by the dimensionless grain size, the specific

gravity of sediments and the d

=D variable; (iii) transport

mode: de

fined by d=R, D

2

=A, y

s

=D, W

b

=Y and R=D; and (iv)

flow resistance: defined by the Darcy friction factor. Based on
these, the input variables vector x

ij

should include the previous

variables to predict the particle Froude number.

Two new self-cleansing models were developed for the

two sediment non-deposition conditions already mentioned.
The R package

‘glmnet’ (

Friedman et al.



) was used to

apply the LASSO method. In both cases the model output
variable was the threshold particle Froude number F

Ri

and

the model input variables were selected automatically
from the set x

ij

by solving the following regression problem:

min

X

n

i

¼1

ln (F

Roi

)

 ln β

0

þ

X

p

j

¼1

β

j

x

ij

0
@

1
A

0
@

1
A

2

þ λ

L

X

p

j

¼1

j

j

2
6

4

3
7

5

¼ min

X

n

i

¼1

(ln (F

Roi

)

 ln (F

Ri

))

2

þ λ

L

X

p

j

¼1

j

j

2
4

3
5

(5)

x

ij

¼

Y
D

, D

gr

,

λ,

d

R

,

d

D

,

d

A

,

D

2

A

, C

v

,

W

b

Y

,

y

s

D

(6)

611

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

Table 2

|

Non-deposition with deposited bed data experimentally collected in the 595 mm PVC pipe

Run no.

d

SG

C

v

R

S

o

V

l

y

s

=D

W

b

(mm)

(-)

(ppm)

(mm)

(%)

(m/s)

(%)

(mm)

1

1.51

2.66

786

23.46

0.975

0.73

0.94

115

2

1.51

2.66

763

22.76

0.720

0.80

0.13

43

3

1.51

2.66

744

26.57

0.763

0.83

0.25

60

4

1.51

2.66

982

28.63

0.763

0.96

0.21

55

5

1.51

2.66

389

35.25

0.508

0.86

0.38

73

6

1.51

2.66

702

32.62

0.763

0.93

1.12

125

7

1.51

2.66

939

39.54

0.805

1.05

0.86

110

8

1.51

2.66

632

51.01

0.720

0.90

0.58

90

9

1.51

2.66

1,214

20.87

0.975

0.87

0.61

93

10

1.51

2.66

3,283

14.96

1.822

0.82

0.51

85

11

1.51

2.66

9,596

20.34

2.076

1.12

1.03

120

12

1.51

2.66

4,419

22.08

1.992

1.15

0.51

85

13

1.51

2.66

10,275

9.63

5.424

0.87

0.30

65

14

1.51

2.66

2,980

29.03

1.525

1.16

0.86

110

15

1.51

2.66

2,249

23.84

1.525

1.00

0.30

65

16

1.51

2.66

6,227

15.90

2.500

1.06

0.58

90

17

1.51

2.66

2,128

35.73

0.847

1.06

1.12

125

18

1.51

2.66

7,400

22.25

2.034

1.21

0.71

100

19

1.51

2.66

3,702

23.67

2.034

1.11

0.45

80

20

1.51

2.66

4,172

25.03

2.034

1.21

0.78

105

21

2.6

2.64

2,951

28.40

1.525

1.16

0.86

110

22

2.6

2.64

4,435

23.02

1.992

1.23

0.58

90

23

2.6

2.64

4,962

20.49

2.119

1.04

0.45

80

24

2.6

2.64

9,101

14.96

2.585

1.07

0.51

85

25

2.6

2.64

2,213

40.97

1.314

1.18

0.58

90

26

2.6

2.64

4,995

33.33

1.568

1.21

0.64

95

27

2.6

2.64

3,432

36.12

1.398

1.24

0.58

90

28

2.6

2.64

2,408

44.25

1.271

1.39

1.12

125

29

2.6

2.64

1,968

52.01

1.059

1.26

0.86

110

30

2.6

2.64

1,615

55.59

1.017

1.29

0.71

100

31

1.22

2.67

2,327

15.26

1.653

0.90

0.35

70

32

1.22

2.67

4,759

17.26

1.653

1.11

0.45

80

33

1.22

2.67

3,162

22.01

1.653

1.17

0.64

95

34

1.22

2.67

1,710

30.22

1.229

0.97

0.40

75

35

1.22

2.67

987

31.51

1.229

1.17

0.51

85

36

1.22

2.67

1,052

20.90

0.890

0.81

0.38

73

37

1.22

2.67

1,660

31.19

0.466

0.80

0.45

80

38

1.22

2.67

488

27.58

0.636

0.89

0.55

88

39

1.22

2.67

3,365

9.01

1.525

0.88

0.18

50

40

1.22

2.67

2,527

29.46

1.144

1.28

0.67

97

41

1.22

2.67

652

34.59

0.720

1.01

0.51

85

(continued)

612

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

where F

Roi

and F

Ri

are the observed and estimated particle

Froude number, de

fined as:

F

Roi

¼

V

L

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

(7)

F

Ri

¼ β

0

þ

X

p

j

¼1

β

j

x

ij

(8)

where V

L

is the self-cleansing velocity, g is gravitational con-

stant, SG is the speci

fic gravity of the sediment, S

o

the pipe

slope, D the pipe diameter, A the wetted area, R the hydraulic
radius, D

gr

the dimensionless grain size,

λ the Darcy friction

factor, d is mean particle diameter, Y the water level, C

v

the

volumetric sediment concentration and W

b

the bed sediment

width. By applying the LASSO method to 107 experimental
data collected, the following model was obtained for the
non-deposited conditions (linearized version shown in
Equation (9) and non-linear in Equation (10)):

ln (F

Ri

)

¼ 1:566 þ 0:058 ln (λ)  0:593 ln

d

R

 

þ 0:209 ln (C

v

)

(9)

F

Ri

¼ 4:79λ

0

:058

d

R

 

0:593

C

0

:209

v

(10)

The same analysis was carried out for the non-depo-

sition with deposited bed condition. The 54 data collected
in the laboratory were used as observed information. The

model obtained was similar to the one for non-deposition
without deposited bed condition (see Equations (9) and
(10)) with the difference being that the input variables
y

s

=D and D

gr

appear in the

final expression:

ln (F

Ri

)

¼ 1:764  0:169 ln (D

gr

)

þ 0:144 ln (C

v

)

 0:104 ln

y

s

D

 

 0:305 ln

d

R

 

 0:059 ln (λ)

(11)

F

Ri

¼ 5:83D

0:169

gr

C

0

:144

v

y

s

D

 

0:104

d

R

 

0:305

λ

0:059

(12)

VALIDATION OF SELF-CLEANSING MODELS

The self-cleansing models shown in Equations (10) and (12)
were tested with the datasets obtained from the literature (as
shown in

Table 3

) with the aim of (a) further evaluating the

accuracy of the self-cleansing models shown here and (b)
comparing these to literature models, all under the different
hydraulic conditions and sediment characteristics, used in
the literature. In addition, the literature self-cleansing
models shown in

Table 3

, all of which were developed

with the data collected on smaller pipes (i.e. less than
500 mm), were tested with the data collected on the
595 mm PVC pipe to further assess their prediction accuracy
under these conditions.

Table 2

|

continued

Run no.

d

SG

C

v

R

S

o

V

l

y

s

=D

W

b

(mm)

(-)

(ppm)

(mm)

(%)

(m/s)

(%)

(mm)

42

1.22

2.67

460

37.32

0.678

0.90

0.45

80

43

1.22

2.67

1,504

17.05

1.059

0.75

0.25

60

44

1.22

2.67

5,697

12.11

2.203

1.20

0.33

68

45

0.47

2.66

2,516

8.43

1.398

1.39

0.49

83

46

0.47

2.66

2,594

9.46

1.610

1.20

0.33

68

47

0.47

2.66

8,522

10.34

2.373

1.05

0.29

64

48

0.47

2.66

6,424

14.12

2.373

1.53

0.32

67

49

0.47

2.66

5,317

15.06

1.822

1.36

0.71

100

50

0.47

2.66

2,572

17.63

1.314

1.10

0.39

74

51

0.47

2.66

547

19.78

0.847

0.92

0.35

70

52

0.47

2.66

764

27.60

0.890

0.89

0.30

65

53

0.47

2.66

1,918

24.86

1.229

1.05

0.35

70

54

0.47

2.66

5,131

21.53

1.780

1.30

0.38

73

613

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

Table 3

|

Literature self-cleansing models for predicting the non-deposition sediment conditions in sewer pipes

Reference

Model

Non-deposition criterion

No.

data

Pipe diameter

(mm)

Particle

diameter (mm)

Sediment

concentration (ppm)

Mayerle (

)

. Data collected from

Safari et al. (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 4:32C

0

:23

v

d

R

 

0:68

Without deposited bed

106

152

0.50

–8.74

20

–1,275

May et al. (

)

C

v

¼ 0:0211

Y
D

 

0

:36

D

2

A

 

d

R

 

0

:60

1

V

t

V

l

4

V

2

l

gD

(SG

 1)

1

:5

Without deposited bed

48

298.8

0.72

0.31

–443

Perrusquía (

)

Only experimental data

With deposited bed

38

225

0.9

18.7

–408

El-Zaemey (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 1:95C

0

:17

v

W

b

Y

0:40

d

D

 

0:57

λ

0

:10

With deposited bed

290

305

0.53

–8.4

7.0

–917

Ab Ghani (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 3:08C

0

:21

v

D

0:09

gr

d

R

 

0:53

λ

0:21

s

Without deposited bed

221

154, 305 and

450

0.46

–8.30

0.76

–1,450

Ab Ghani (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 1:18C

0

:16

v

W

b

Y

0:18

d

D

 

0:34

λ

0:31

With deposited bed

26

450

0.72

21

–1,269

May (

)

Only experimental data

Without deposited bed

27

450

0.73

2

–38

May (

)

η ¼ C

v

D

W

b

A

D

2

 

λ

g

θ

f

V

2

l

8g(SG

 1)D

1

With deposited bed

46

450

0.47

–0.73

3.5

–8.23

Ota (

)

C

v

¼ 0:001965

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

d

R

 

2

=3

"

#

3

:645

Without deposited bed

36

305

0.71

–5.6

4.2

–59.4

Vongvisessomjai et al. (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 4:31C

0

:226

v

d

R

 

0:616

Without deposited bed

45

100 and 150

0.20

–0.43

4

–90

Safari et al. (

b

)

η ¼ 0:95 

2

:83

exp 8

:36

λ

g

θ

f

V

2

l

8g(SG

 1)D

With deposited bed

Data from

May (

)

Safari & Shirzad (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 3:66C

0

:16

v

d

R

 

0:40

y

s

Y

 

0:10

With deposited bed

Data from

El-Zaemey (

)

,

Perrusquía (

)

,

May (

)

and

Ab

Ghani (

)

Montes et al. (

)

V

l

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

gd

(SG

 1)

p

¼ 3:35C

0

:20

v

d

R

 

0:60

Without deposited bed

Data from

Ab Ghani (

)

λ

s

: Darcy

’s friction factor with sediment, λ

s

¼ 0:0014C

0:04

v

W

b

Y

0

:34

R
d

 

0

:24

D

0

:54

gr

.

D

gr

: Dimensionless grain size, D

gr

¼

gd

3

(SG

 1)

ν

2

1

=3

.

λ

g

: Grain friction factor,

1ffiffiffiffiffi

λ

g

p ¼ 2 log

d

12R

þ

0

:6275ν

V

l

R

ffiffiffiffiffi

λ

g

p

"

#

, where

ν is the kinematic viscosity of fluid.

θ

f

: Transition factor,

θ

f

¼

exp

Re

12

:5

 1

exp

Re

12

:5

þ 1

, where Re

is the particle Reynolds number, Re

¼

ffiffiffi

λ
8

r

V

l

d

ν

.

V

t

: Incipient motion threshold velocity, V

t

¼ 0:125(gd(SG  1))

0

:5

Y

d

 

0

:47

.

η: Dimensionless parameter of transport.

614

C.
Montes

et
al.

|

Non-deposition

self-cleansing

models

for

large

sew

er
pipes

Wa

ter

Science

&
Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

Model prediction accuracy is estimated using two per-

formance indicators, root mean squared error (RMSE) and
mean absolute percentage error (MAPE):

RMSE

¼

ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

P

n
i

¼1

(F

Roi

 F

Ri

)

2

n

s

(13)

MAPE

¼

100

n

X

n

i

¼1

F

Roi

 F

Ri

F

Roi

(14)

Note that a value of RMSE and MAPE close to 0 indi-

cates high model prediction accuracy, i.e. good

fit between

the observed and predicted data. The RMSE and MAPE
values obtained for the case of non-deposition without
deposited bed are presented in

Table 4

.

The following observations can be made from

Table 4

:

The

Mayerle (

)

model seems to be over

fitted as it has

high

prediction

accuracy

(RMSE

¼ 4.119; MAPE ¼

10.079) only for the data collected in their own exper-
iments. When this model is applied to other datasets, the
results are not satisfactory. For example, when the

Mayerle

(

)

model is applied to the data collected in our exper-

iments, poor performance is obtained (as shown in

Figure 2

). This is due to the inability of this model to extrap-

olate predictions beyond the range of data that was used for
its development.

Results obtained by using the

May et al. (

)

model

were similar to the

Mayerle (

)

model results. If the

May et al. (

)

model is used for designing large self-

cleansing sewer pipes, the model tends to overestimate
the minimum velocity required to avoid particle depo-
sition. Additionally, an incipient motion threshold
velocity is required to use this model. This value needs
to be estimated on the basis of experimental data and
regression equations obtained for certain sediment
characteristics which is not pragmatic. In this context,

Safari et al. (

)

outlined several studies that attempt

to predict incipient motion threshold velocity using
equations based on experimental data.

The

Ab Ghani (

)

model presents better results in

comparison with

Mayerle (

)

and

May et al. (

)

models. The model includes two additional input vari-
ables (the dimensionless grain size and the Darcy
friction factor) to predict the particle Froude number.
However, the value of the exponent related to the dimen-
sionless grain size is low (

0.09), which shows that this

variable is not a signi

ficant input for this model. In

addition, this model has good prediction performance
when the 595 mm pipe diameter data (for F

Roi

< 8.0) is

used (as shown in

Figure 2

), for the same abovemen-

tioned previously.

The

Ota (

)

model uses a similar group of input vari-

ables to estimate the self-cleansing velocity. This model

Table 4

|

Performance of models found in the literature and the new self-cleansing model (Equation (10)) obtained for non-deposition without deposited bed criterion

Dataset

Performance

index

Self-cleansing model

Mayerle

(1988)

May et al.
(1989)

Ab Ghani

(1993)

Ota

(1999)

Vongvisessomjai

et al. (2010)

Montes et al.
(2018)

New model,

Equation (10)

Mayerle (

)

RMSE

4.119

3.273

3.376

3.502

3.310

3.170

3.147

MAPE

10.079

15.194

9.636

10.439

10.762

14.500

12.504

May et al. (

)

RMSE

4.321

3.433

3.545

3.652

3.472

3.330

3.302

MAPE

12.400

17.822

16.637

16.593

17.657

21.657

21.810

May (

)

RMSE

4.151

3.291

3.392

3.511

3.328

3.189

3.167

MAPE

37.349

9.706

10.738

8.110

9.536

9.226

8.331

Ab Ghani (

)

RMSE

1.598

0.567

0.603

0.762

0.569

0.500

0.510

MAPE

26.965

9.338

10.350

11.930

10.278

8.730

9.435

Ota (

)

RMSE

4.068

3.210

3.306

3.424

3.234

3.093

3.066

MAPE

19.632

12.396

9.644

10.313

7.461

7.174

6.807

Vongvisessomjai et al.

(

)

RMSE

3.956

3.132

3.222

3.332

3.159

3.031

3.007

MAPE

24.764

8.274

6.748

4.626

2.036

5.337

2.012

Current study

RMSE

4.041

3.177

3.276

3.387

3.208

3.072

3.047

MAPE

40.327

29.304

23.307

28.990

19.203

15.639

14.471

Values in bold type show the best performing model in each dataset analysed.

615

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

has similar prediction results to the

Mayerle (

)

and

May et al. (

)

models, with acceptable accuracy for

small particle Froude numbers and poor prediction accu-
racy for larger particle Froude number values (F

Ri

> 7.0),

as shown in

Figure 2

.

The

Vongvisessomjai et al. (

)

model shows good per-

formance in general for all datasets. However, when this
equation is applied to the 595 mm PVC pipe diameter
data, the model tends to overestimate the particle
Froude number (as shown in

Figure 2

). In comparison

with the

Ab Ghani (

)

model, this model is simpler

and does not consider the dimensionless grain size
and the Darcy friction factor in the estimation of the
modi

fied Froude number (structure is similar to

Ota

(

)

equation) which is an advantage. This model

seems to be more general and good in the prediction
on self-cleansing conditions for pipe diameters of less
than 500 mm.

The

Montes et al. (

)

model tends to represent the

observed data for all the datasets evaluated better than

Figure 2

|

Comparison of performance of non-deposition without deposited bed models using the experimental data collected for the 595 mm PVC pipe. (a)

Mayerle (1988)

; (b)

May et al.

(1989)

; (c)

Ab Ghani (1993)

; (d)

Ota (1999)

; (e)

Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

; (f)

Montes et al. (2018)

; and (g) Equation (10).

616

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

previous self-cleansing models. This model has the same
structure as the

Vongvisessomjai et al. (

)

and

Ota

(

)

models, with values of exponents of different

input variables being slightly different. The model
shows high accuracy for all datasets but is still inferior
to the new model shown in Equation (10) (see below).

The new model shown in Equation (10) has high predic-
tion accuracy for all datasets, especially for the data
collected using larger sewer pipes. Even when this
model is applied to existing data in the literature, better
results are obtained than those obtained using literature
self-cleaning models (as shown in

Figure 3

and

Table 4

).

This model has a similar structure to the

Vongvisessomjai

et al.

(

)

and

Montes et al. (

)

equations.

As the previous results show, all the traditional self-

cleansing models found in the literature presents poor
performance/accuracy when tested with the new exper-
imental dataset. As

Figure 2

shows, all the models tend to

overestimate the threshold velocity. This con

firms the

assumption that traditional self-cleansing models can make
accurate predictions only for small sewer pipes, i.e. pipes
with diameter

<500 mm.

The results obtained for the case of non-deposition with

deposited bed data are shown in

Table 5

.

The following can be observed from

Table 5

:

The

El-Zaemey (

)

model tends to correctly represent

the self-cleansing conditions for

Perrusquía (

)

data

and their own data. However, for

Ab Ghani (

)

and

our data collected on the 595 mm PVC pipe, this
model

’s performance is poor, with low fitting levels

obtained (as shown in

Figure 4

). This model tends to over-

estimate the minimum self-cleansing velocity, which
leads to installing steeper and hence more costly pipes.

The

Ab Ghani (

)

model has the same structure as the

El-Zaemey (

)

model, as both models consider the

same group of input variables to calculate the threshold
self-cleansing velocity. The results obtained tend to pre-
sent good accuracy for all datasets. The

Ab Ghani

(

)

model has acceptable accuracy even on our data

collected on the 595 mm PVC pipe (as shown in

Figure 4

),

with RMSE and MAPE values of 2.117 and 27.483,
respectively. Having said that, this model is still inferior
to the new model shown in Equation (12) for the data col-
lected on a large diameter pipe.

Figure 3

|

Comparison of performance of Equation (10) using the experimental data collected in the literature. Data from: (a)

Mayerle (1988)

; (b)

May et al. (1989)

; (c)

Ab Ghani (1993)

;

(d)

May (1993)

; (e)

Ota (1999)

; and (f)

Vongvisessomjai et al. (2010)

.

617

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

The

May (

)

model tends to underestimate the mini-

mum self-cleansing values on large sewer pipes, as
shown in

Figure 4(c)

. As a result, particle deposition pro-

blems could arise in real sewer systems. Additionally, this

model has as an input the dimensionless transport par-
ameter (

η), which was calculated for limited sediment

and hydraulic conditions. Based on the above, this trans-
port parameter is dif

ficult to estimate, and its prediction

Table 5

|

Performance of models found in the literature and the new self-cleansing model (Equation (12)) obtained for non-deposition with deposited bed criterion

Dataset

Performance index

Self-cleansing model

El-Zaemey (1991)

Ab Ghani (1993)

May (1993)

Safari et al. (2017b)

Safari & Shirzad (2019)

New model,

Equation (12)

Perrusquía (

)

RMSE

0.786

0.576

2.669

2.883

0.521

0.464

MAPE

17.411

10.833

63.261

71.279

10.550

10.348

El-Zaemey (

)

RMSE

0.494

0.814

2.580

2.749

0.757

0.659

MAPE

10.436

13.408

60.744

71.963

14.251

11.922

May (

)

RMSE

3.409

1.153

3.561

3.562

1.409

1.014

MAPE

49.757

11.702

45.381

47.177

18.734

11.154

Ab Ghani (

)

RMSE

5.105

2.407

3.724

3.722

1.316

1.161

MAPE

72.772

33.614

47.580

48.831

16.544

14.178

Current study

RMSE

4.217

2.117

2.753

2.696

3.059

1.565

MAPE

54.510

27.483

27.487

26.186

21.047

10.355

Values in bold type show the best performing model in each dataset analysed.

Figure 4

|

Comparison of performance of non-deposition with deposited bed models using the experimental data collected for the 595 mm PVC pipe. Models from: (a)

El-Zaemey (1991)

;

(b)

Ab Ghani (1993)

; (c)

May (1993)

; (d)

Nalluri et al. (1997)

; (e)

Safari et al. (2017b)

; and (f) Equation (12).

618

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

does not present good accuracy with experimental data.
Full details can be found in

May (

)

.

The

Safari et al. (

b

) model results are similar to the

May (

)

and

Ab Ghani (

)

models when compared

for large sewer pipes, i.e. our data. These models tend to
underestimate the minimum self-cleansing velocity in
large sewer pipes. However, the results are better than
for

El-Zaemey (

)

, as shown in

Table 5

.

The

Safari & Shirzad (

)

model results are similar to

May (

)

and

Safari et al. (

b)

, i.e. the self-cleansing

calculation tends to be underestimated in large sewer
pipes. In contrast, this model presents a simpler structure
because it does not consider the dimensionless parameter
of transport (

η) and the calculation of velocity is explicit.

Results tend not to be satisfactory for large sewer pipes
(as shown in

Figure 4

).

The new model shown in Equation (12) estimates the
self-cleansing conditions across all experimental datasets
with acceptable accuracy, as shown in

Figure 5

. This

model is explicit for calculating self-cleansing velocity
and considers similar group of parameters than the

models in the literature. Based on the results obtained,
this model can be used to design new self-cleansing
sewer pipes considering the non-deposition with depos-
ited bed criterion.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study the non-deposition criteria was applied to
large sewer pipes. A set of 107 data and 54 data, for non-
deposition without deposited bed and deposited bed,
respectively, was collected at laboratory scale. These exper-
iments were carried out varying steady

flow conditions and

sediment characteristics. The data collected were used to
test the performance of typical self-cleansing equations
found in the literature. In addition, based on the LASSO
technique, two new self-cleansing models were obtained
for each non-deposition criterion. These new models were
tested with data collected from the literature and their per-
formance was measured by using RMSE and MAPE.

Figure 5

|

Comparison of performance of Equation (12) using the experimental data collected from the literature. Data from: (a)

Perrusquía (1991)

; (b)

El-Zaemey (1991)

; (c)

May (1993)

; and

(d)

Ab Ghani (1993)

.

619

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

The following conclusions are based on the results

obtained:

(1) The two new self-cleansing models developed and pre-

sented here have overall best predictive performance
for two different sediment non-deposition criteria
when compared to a selection of well-known models
from the literature. This is especially true for predictions
made on larger diameter pipes (500 mm and above).

(2) The existing self-cleansing models from the literature

tend to be over

fitted, i.e. demonstrate a rather high pre-

diction accuracy when applied to the data collected by
the authors, but this accuracy deteriorates quickly
when applied to the datasets collected by other authors.
For large sewer pipes, these models, being developed for
datasets collected on smaller diameter pipes, tend to
overestimate the threshold self-cleansing velocities,
especially in the case of non-deposition without depos-
ited bed.

Further research is recommended to test the perform-

ance of new models in larger sewer pipes and with
different pipe materials, sediment characteristics and
hydraulic conditions. In addition, experiments under non-
steady conditions are essential to test the sediment dynamics
in real sewer systems.

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

The Supplementary Material for this paper is available online
at

https://dx.doi.org/10.2166/wst.2020.154

. Supplementary

material 1:

https://youtu.be/YC_AEBMqYC0

. Supplemen-

tary material 2:

https://youtu.be/ivyoBba8V-c

.

REFERENCES

Ab Ghani, A.

 Sediment Transport in Sewers. PhD thesis,

University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne,
UK.

Ackers, J., Butler, D. & May, R.

 Design of Sewers to Control

Sediment Problems

. Report 141, HR Wallingford, London,

UK.

Alihosseini, M. & Thamsen, P.



Analysis of sediment transport

in sewer pipes using a coupled CFD-DEM model and
experimental work

. Urban Water Journal

16 (4), 259–268.

https://doi.org/10.1080/1573062X.2019.1669187.

ASTM D854-14.

 Standard Test Methods for Specific Gravity of

Soil Solids by Water Pycnometer

. ASTM International, West

Conshohocken, USA.

British Standard Institution.

 Sewerage Guide to New

Sewerage Construction BS8005 Part 1

. British Standard

Institution, London, UK.

Butler, D., May, R. & Ackers, J.



Sediment transport in sewers

part 1: background

. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil

Engineers

– Water, Maritime and Energy 118 (2), 103–112.

https://doi.org/10.1680/iwtme.1996.28431.

Ebtehaj, I. & Bonakdari, H.

a

Assessment of evolutionary

algorithms in predicting non-deposition sediment transport

.

Urban Water Journal

13 (5), 499–510. https://doi.org/10.

1080/1573062X.2014.994003.

Ebtehaj, I. & Bonakdari, H.

b

Bed load sediment transport in

sewers at limit of deposition

. Scientia Iranica

23 (3), 907–917.

https://doi.org/10.24200/sci.2016.2169.

Ebtehaj, I., Bonakdari, H. & Zaji, A.



An expert system with

radial basis function neural network based on decision trees
for predicting sediment transport in sewers

. Water Science

and Technology

74 (1), 176–183. https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.

2016.174.

El-Zaemey, A.

 Sediment Transport Over Deposited Beds in

Sewers

. PhD thesis, University of Newcastle upon Tyne,

Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Friedman, J., Hastie, T. & Tibshirani, R.



Regularization paths

for generalized linear models via coordinate descent

. Journal

of Statistical Software

33 (1), 1–22. https://doi.org/10.18637/

jss.v033.i01.

Great Lakes

 Recommended Standards for Wastewater

Facilities

. Health Research Inc., Health Education Services

Division, Albany, NY.

James, G., Witten, D., Hastie, T. & Tibshirani, R.



An

Introduction to Statistical Learning

. Springer Texts in Statistics,

New York, USA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-7138-7.

Kargar, K., Safari, M., Mohammadi, M. & Samadianfard, S.



Sediment transport modeling in open channels using neuro-
fuzzy and gene expression programming techniques

. Water

Science and Technology

79 (12), 2318–2327. https://doi.org/

10.2166/wst.2019.229.

May, R.

 Sediment Transport in Pipes and Sewers with Deposited

Beds

. Report SR 320, HR Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK.

May, R., Brown, P., Hare, G. & Jones, K.

 Self-Cleansing

Conditions for Sewers Carrying Sediment

. Report SR 221, HR

Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK.

May, R., Ackers, J., Butler, D. & John, S.



Development of

design methodology for self-cleansing sewers

. Water Science

and Technology

33 (9), 195–205. https://doi.org/10.1016/

0273-1223(96)00387-3.

Mayerle, R.

 Sediment Transport in Rigid Boundary Channels.

PhD thesis, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle
upon Tyne, UK.

Montes, C., Berardi, L., Kapelan, Z. & Saldarriaga, J.



Evaluation of Sediment Transport in Sewers Using the EPR-
MOGA-XL. In: Proceedings of the 1st International WDSA/
CCWI 2018 Joint Conference

, Kingston, Canada.

Montes, C., Kapelan, Z. & Saldarriaga, J.



Impact of self-

cleansing criteria choice on the optimal design of sewer
networks in South America

. Water

11 (6), 1148. https://doi.

org/10.3390/w11061148.

620

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

/var/www/pavco.com.co/public/site/pdftohtml/d6b5df0a6a35c26b770d37a61148575e/index-html.html
background image

Nalluri, C. & Ab Ghani, A.



Design options for self-cleansing

storm sewers

. Water Science and Technology

33 (9), 215–220.

https://doi.org/10.1016/0273-1223(96)00389-7.

Nalluri, C., El-Zaemey, A. & Chan, H.



Sediment transport

over fixed deposited beds in sewers

– an appraisal of existing

models

. Water Science and Technology

36 (8–9), 123–128.

https://doi.org/10.1016/S0273-1223(97)00609-4.

Novak, P. & Nalluri, C.

 Sediment transport in smooth fixed

bed channels. Journal of the Hydraulics Division

101 (HY9),

1139

–1154.

Ota, J.

 Effect of Particle Size and Gradation on Sediment

Transport in Storm Sewers.

PhD thesis, University of

Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Perrusquía, G.

 Bedload Transport in Storm Sewers: Stream

Traction in Pipe Channels

. PhD thesis, Chalmers University

of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Perrusquía, G.



An experimental study on the transport of

sediment in sewer pipes with a permanent deposit

. Water

Science and Technology

25 (8), 115–122. https://doi.org/10.

2166/wst.1992.0185.

Robinson, M. & Graf, W.

 Critical Deposit Velocities for Low-

Concentration Sand-Water Mixtures. In: Paper Presented at
the ASCE National Water Resources Engineering Meeting

,

January 24

–28, Atlanta: GA.

Safari, M.



Decision tree (DT), generalized regression neural

network (GR) and multivariate adaptive regression splines
(MARS) models for sediment transport in sewer pipes

. Water

Science and Technology

79 (6), 1113–1122. https://doi.org/

10.2166/wst.2019.106.

Safari, M. & Shirzad, A.



Self-cleansing design of sewers:

definition of the optimum deposited bed thickness

. Water

Environment Research

91 (5), 407–416. https://doi.org/10.

1002/wer.1037.

Safari, M., Aksoy, H., Unal, N. & Mohammadi, M.

a

Non-deposition self-cleansing design criteria for drainage
systems

. Journal of Hydro-Environment Research

14

(2017), 76

–84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jher.2016.11.002.

Safari, M., Shirzad, A. & Mohammadi, M.

b

Sediment

transport modeling in deposited bed sewers: unified form of
may

’s equations using the particle swarm optimization

algorithm

. Water Science and Technology

76 (4), 992–1000.

https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.2017.267.

Safari, M., Mohammadi, M. & Ab Ghani, A.



Experimental studies

of self-cleansing drainage system design: a review

. Journal of

Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice

9 (4), 04018017.

https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)PS.1949-1204.0000335.

Shirazi, R., Campisano, A., Modica, C. & Willems, P.



Modelling the erosive effects of sewer flushing using
different sediment transport formulae

. Water Science and

Technology

69 (6), 1198–1204. https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.

2013.810.

Tibshirani, R.



Regression shrinkage and selection via the

Lasso

. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B

(Methodological)

58 (1), 267–288. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.

2517-6161.1996.tb02080.x.

Torres, M., Rodríguez, J. & Leitão, J.



Geostatistical analysis to

identify characteristics involved in sewer pipes and urban
tree interactions

. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening

25,

36

–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ufug.2017.04.013.

Vongvisessomjai, N., Tingsanchali, T. & Babel, M.



Non-

deposition design criteria for sewers with part-full flow

.

Urban Water Journal

7 (1), 61–77. https://doi.org/10.1080/

15730620903242824.

Yao, K.

 Sewer line design based on critical shear stress.

Journal of the Environmental Engineering Division

100 (2),

507

–520.

First received 23 January 2020; accepted in revised form 23 March 2020. Available online 3 April 2020

621

C. Montes et al.

|

Non-deposition self-cleansing models for large sewer pipes

Water Science & Technology

|

81.3

|

2020

Downloaded from http://iwaponline.com/wst/article-pdf/81/3/606/767607/wst081030606.pdf
by guest
on 08 March 2022

¿Quiere saber más? Contáctenos

Declaro haber leído y aceptado la Política de Privacidad